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Parallel processing: duplicate of the signal vs two mics
Old 1 week ago
  #1
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Parallel processing: duplicate of the signal vs two mics

Wondering about parallel processing and if anyone will use 2 mics on a source, and heavily treat one while leaving the other untreated as a way to parallel process. For example, recording a vocal with a nice LDC and an SM57 (phase aligned), and then compress the SM57 and bring it up as “parallel” processing (vs duplicating the LDC or routing it to a parallel aux).
Old 1 week ago
  #2
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chrischoir's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikoo69 View Post
Wondering about parallel processing and if anyone will use 2 mics on a source, and heavily treat one while leaving the other untreated as a way to parallel process. For example, recording a vocal with a nice LDC and an SM57 (phase aligned), and then compress the SM57 and bring it up as “parallel” processing (vs duplicating the LDC or routing it to a parallel aux).
You are essentially duplicating them when you use a send in a DAW. That is how DAWs work internally. They make a copy not a reference. Even on a analog console the effects unit will be a digital copy, this is why effects have a "mix "or a Wet/Dry capability. In a DAW an insert isn't really making a copy since it is serial in nature and a reference, but the plugin will be making a copy since you now have mix or wet/dry in the plugin.

As far as two mics go, that is not uncommon. It depends on what you are going for. If it sounds good to you then do it. Most engineers that use 2 mics during vocal tracking tend to use one or the other and not usually both in the mix. This is to to say you can't do what you are thinking of doing. If it works do it. There is no right or wrong just be cautious of possible phase/comb filtering issues.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Here for the gear
 

If you're simply wanting to do parallel processing, I'd say just do it in your DAW.

If you're wanting to blend 2 different tones of the same source, then using 2 mics is a good way to do it.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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DeadPoet's Avatar
Why not? You use close and far mics as well as clean and effected mics on drums, why not on other sources?

Harddisc space is cheap, it's easy to record experiments and delete them when not needed. Effected or 'weird' sound may inspire the person you're recording as well.


Herwig
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Quote:
Wondering about parallel processing and if anyone will use 2 mics on a source, and heavily treat one while leaving the other untreated as a way to parallel process
It is done all the time. Take the Bass guitar. A lot of times you will mic the bass cabinet and also take the direct out into the DAW and then combine both until you like the sound you want. You also do it with guitar as well.

If leaving one untreated and then processing one heavily works for you, then that s the right decision for you. If processing both of them works for you, then that is the right decision. If you leave both of them unprocessed, then that is the right decision for you. If you use 3 mics and process 2 and leave one alone and you get the sound you want, then that is the right decision for you

You can do anything as long as it gets you the sound you want. It doesn't matter if its a method that is done or rarely done.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Gear Guru
 

Both are done all the time.

Semantically I would say two different mics is not strictly "parallel". As there could be worlds of difference between the positioning, and of course even the mics themselves before you even start processing. In practical terms, however, the technique can be much the same and create similar results.

I like compressor plugins that have a mix control, but with those, one side of the parallel has to be dry. If you make 2 copies, you could have one side at 10:1 and one side at 2:1. Whether you would want to or when it would be appropriate is situational.

On certain occasions, I have had to 'rescue' an already mixed track with some very aggressive mastering. I have made as many as four copies of the track, processed them differently and then recombined them to get a final result closer to what the client wanted. Of course nowadays with separation software coming along, this probably will be less necessary in the future.

I don't do the type of thing you describe using two mics with a lead vocal, as my "philosophy" with lead vocals is to get as much signal integrity as possible. IMO, there is no such thing as a free lunch.

But kick drum, guitars, bass I often dual-mic it. Or mic and DI it, as mentioned above.
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