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LUFS for Itunes - youtube - spotify .... 2020 ?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Gear Addict
 
toofanstudio's Avatar
 

LUFS for Itunes - youtube - spotify .... 2020 ?

I hear some music on itunes more than standard .
what is last true standard ?
for example I test Bille Eilish on my I-tunes account and result is :
NAME TRACK : XANNY
Time : 00:54 ~ 1:08
Open In Itunes APP with maximum level
Record on Garage band DA/AD Rec
__________________________
TP : -0.10db
Momentary : -6~-9 LU
Short-Term : -7~-8 LU
Integrated : -7~-8 LU
Maximum Loudness : -5.6 LUFS
_________________________
I read some LUFS Standard and I don't know which one is true ?
Would you please to help me ?
__________________________
SOUND CLOUD. -9 ( LOUDNESS ). 9DR. -1.0 TP 128kbps mp3
ITUNES STORE -9~-13 ( LOUDNESS). 9DR. -1.0 TP 256kbpsAAC
SPOTIFY. -13~-15 ( LOUDNESS). 9DR. -1.0 TP. 256kbpsAAC
YOUTUBE. -13~-15 ( LOUDNESS). 9DR. -1.0 TP. 256kbpsAAC
ITUNES RADIO. -15~ -16.5 ( LOUDNESS). 9DR. -1.0 TP. 256kbpsAAC
__________________________

Streaming Service Playback Level
Apple Music *Soundcheck On*
~ -16 LUFS
Amazon Music
~ -14 LUFS
YouTube
~ -13 LUFS
Spotify
~ -14 LUFS
Tidal
~ -14 LUFS
__________________________
Old 1 week ago
  #2
You can do whatever you want. Here's how I currently do it:
  • Loop the loudest part of the song.
  • Make that part -10 LUFS integrated.
  • ???
  • PROFIT!

According to loudnesspenalty.com, all my songs would get turned down on all sites but only a little bit (-1, -2).

Keep in mind I like dynamics. I use Youlean. The loudness of all of my songs is pretty comparable that way.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Gear Addict
 
toofanstudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by johannburkard View Post
You can do whatever you want. Here's how I currently do it:
  • Loop the loudest part of the song.
  • Make that part -10 LUFS integrated.
  • ???
  • PROFIT!

According to loudnesspenalty.com, all my songs would get turned down on all sites but only a little bit (-1, -2).

Keep in mind I like dynamics. I use Youlean. The loudness of all of my songs is pretty comparable that way.
Nice , I doing this test and I receive some louder number of platform standard .
Why Billi music is -7~ -8 LU and standard of Itunes is -16 LU ?

Also , I test it on https://www.loudnesspenalty.com web site . for example , one of my streaming music on itunes . When I upload on loudnesspenalty site , it say your loudness is higher than itunes . But , I play same music on Itunes and I listen -9 LU .

I have TC M clarity analyzer and some more plugin too .
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by toofanstudio View Post
Why Billi music is -7~ -8 LU and standard of Itunes is -16 LU ?
Some music sounds a bit disconnected if there's no compression, I guess.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Gear Addict
 
toofanstudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by johannburkard View Post
Some music sounds a bit disconnected if there's no compression, I guess.
Why some music can be more than standard of application ?
Standard number is same for all music .
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by toofanstudio View Post
Standard number is same for all music .
Yes, and the standard is sufficiently low so that pretty much all music will be lowered in volume.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
The widespread adoption of various normalization algorithms by the big stream companies has brought some relief to listeners driven half-crazy from levels jumping radically from track to track. Happily, rather than simple compression/limiting based normalization, scanned and indexed systems like ReplayGain (RG) seem to have come to the fore for many streamers. (But not all. The stream service I recently left after more than five years, Google Play Music, never fielded a normalization feature on the desktop. But Google has abandoned it, anyhow, so to heck with them and their silly, new YouTube Music, which apparently uses the BS.1770 standard [LUFS, also known by the older non-standard term LKFS] that's been increasingly adopted.)

Best Mastering Level for Streaming
Quote:
Whenever music gets distributed to Spotify, the audio is stored, cataloged, and then encoded with information with a program known as ReplayGain. This program either turns up or down the volume of the track to the default -14 LUFS, depending on how loud the master is in comparison to that benchmark.
Mastering for Streaming Platforms: 3 Myths Demystified

Mastering audio for Soundcloud, iTunes, Spotify, Amazon Music and Youtube
[This older article from 2016 is included for chronological perspective. I'm not sure Spotify was using RG (Replay Gain) yet back then.]


I haven't read all of all the articles, so if they don't agree, chalk it up to the restless, ever-changing modern era in the music biz.


FWIW, I'm currently on both Amazon HD (lossless) and Tidal Lossless. From my testing of the same track as it appears on both platforms, with and without the individual player's normalization turned on, both Amazon and Tidal use the same non-compression/limiting, indexed normalization (according to the middle article below, Amazon, Tidal and Youtube all use the BS.1770 [ITU-1770] standard) and their normalization algo's produced virtually identical results when tested from by a number of dynamic measures. (Spotify apparently currently uses RG but have committed to converting to BS.1770 in the future.)

As expected, the internal dynamics [dynamic contour, if one will] remained effectively identical. When adjusted for level, the normalized tracks were indistinguishable from standard playback in ABX testing [by me; I'm quite accustomed to such double blind testing].

ADDENDUM -- the second article linked above (3 Myths, Oct 2019) includes this specific info on platforms and their chosen normalization:
Quote:
Next, let’s discuss the trickier matter of reference levels. Not only do all the services use different reference levels, many of them don’t even use the same normalization method. In fact, as of this writing, only Tidal, Amazon Music, and YouTube use BS.1770 (aka, LUFS). Others, such as Spotify, use ReplayGain (often with a modified reference level), while others still have developed their own normalization methods. Apple’s SoundCheck is a good example of the latter case.

To muddy the waters further, there’s nothing to prevent any of the streaming services from changing either their reference level, normalization method, or both down the road. In fact, Spotify has done this in the past. A few years ago they lowered their reference level by 3 dB. They have also stated that in the future they plan to use BS.1770, likely with a reference level of -14 LUFS integrated, but of course, that’s subject to change, and when this switch will take place is anybody’s guess.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LKFS

Last edited by theblue1; 1 week ago at 07:06 PM..
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Here for the gear
 

I pay a professional mastering engineer to master my own tracks raising the songs to commercial level. When they come back to me they are around -10dB to -9dB rms. They haven't suffered across any of the platforms. I don't worry about it.

Just make your mix great and if you're "mastering" your own stuff, just get them sounding good at a competitive level and don't worry about lufs or rms.
Old 1 week ago
  #9
"Just make your mix great..." is good advice. And, unless one's target audience is still using CD changers (or playing files off his hard drive without ReplayGain or BS.1770/LUFS normalization), he probably doesn't even need to worry about 'competitive level' (because all the mainstream stream platforms seem to have adopted some form of level indexing) and can truly mix/master for best sound and dynamics, instead of trying to squeeze a track with wide dynamics into a narrow target zone.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
Here for the gear
 

This is a good post from about getting levels for the various platforms

Targeting Mastering Loudness for Streaming (LUFS, Spotify, YouTube)-Why NOT to do it.
Old 1 week ago
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by BStone View Post
This is a good post from about getting levels for the various platforms

Targeting Mastering Loudness for Streaming (LUFS, Spotify, YouTube)-Why NOT to do it.
"My advice is to make one digital master that sounds good, is not overly crushed for loudness, and use it for everything."

Solid advice, there. As the more recent info in the 2019 article (middle article in my earlier post) suggests, even as greater 'standardization' in streamer normalization has come into place, that's just more reason in your mixing/mastering to target the sound and dynamics you want to hear, rather than trying to chase what you think might happen to your track when it gets out into the world -- or somehow 'game' the loudness indexing increasingly used to achieve level loudness across tracks.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
Gear Maniac
 

Some types of music sound good with the density of heavy compression or limiting.

The rule in 2020, is forgetting about loudness standards - master it so the track sounds good. For some songs and genres that means -20, for others it's -6.

Yes they will all get loudness normalized, but more dynamic is not necessarily better for some genres.

Last edited by RyanM; 1 week ago at 10:42 PM..
Old 1 week ago
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by RyanM View Post
Some types of music sound good with the density of heavy compression or limiting.

The rule in 2020, is forgetting about loudness standards and mastering so the track sounds good - for some songs and genres that means -20, for others it's -6.

Yes they will all get loudness normalized, but more dynamic is not necessarily better for some genres.
The great thing is that we seem to be entering an era where, much of the time, tracks of different average loudness can get along in the same queue (when normalizing is turned on; I tend to turn it off when listening to well-mastered albums to preserve the overall album dynamic).

Despite liking many of their tracks quite a bit, I'd all but fallen out of the habit of listening to Modest Mouse -- because so much of their work is really squashed and is 2-3 times louder than most of the rest of what I listen to. Now I can throw them in with my folkie and roots stuff and it all more or less works out. (That said, I do still notice some jumps, even under the unseen hand of level-indexed normalization. But I suppose some of that might be that different normalization schemes might weight bass differently (to accomodate for playback systems that don't have much). My rig is nominally flat down into the 30s and can fire up a room mode in my adjoining kitchen at 30 Hz, so something 'normalized' for typical Sonos or other consumer speakers is likely to come off a bit 'heavy' played back on my system -- at least that's what I'm mostly chalking the issue up to for now.
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