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Unusual mic for guitar cab
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

Unusual mic for guitar cab

I'm looking to buy a mic other than an SM57 for mainly clean electric guitar.

Amps (Fender Deluxe Reverb, Champ etc.)
Guitar (Tele - ash body, maple neck, P90s)
Style (mainly country & melodic stuff)

I started off thinking about a DPA 4061 omni lavalier mic to stick on the grill cloth.

I'm now wondering about the EV 635a Omni dynamic (reporters' mic with low/high roll-off).

I have no idea what these are likely to sound like! Apparently the DPA is natural, but that might be too much of a good thing on a cab.

I've also seen the AEA R92 ribbon mentioned for this application. It's more than I wanted to spend, and I'd prefer something less bulky. Also, I'm not sure if it would be too 'dull' sounding - it seems ribbons are usually used as a second mic on guitar cabs.

No doubt there are a million and one options, but I'd appreciate some thoughts on the above. The 635a is a relatively cheap option, and I'd probably go for that initially if it's likely to be any good.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
Gear Head
 

I'm not clear... Do you already have an SM57 or are you just against using one?

The 635 is a good sounding mic that can be found fairly cheaply still. It will get more room sound because it is omni but you can place it very close to the speaker if you want less room. Also being omni it has no proximity effect so it won't add low end like a cardioid mic up close will.

In my opinion a lav mic sounds like a pain to use for this. I mean if you already owned one then sure give it a try but if you are looking to buy a mic to record electric guitar then there are tons of choices in all kinds of price ranges that handle high volume well and fit nicely into their clip or shockmount and you can then move around on a stand to get it exactly where you want it.

What kind of mic to choose depends on your guitar /amp sound and what kind of final recorded sound that you are after.

Do you play loud or super quiet? Is your room tiny or huge, is it a good sounding room or not very good at all? Do you want a natural room sound or do you want an in your face kind of sound or do you want to add reverb later?

There are many many things that factor into all of this.

Why exactly do you want an "unusual" mic??
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
Gear Maniac
 

Thanks very much for posting that, and for pointing out further questions etc.

I've been mainly recording directly, using things like a passive cab simulator with my amp, and analogue 'amp-in-a-box' pedals and speaker simulators. However, I've been playing directly into the amp, and would like to capture more of the raw tone I'm hearing while playing. I have a Blue Dragonfly mic which I bought ages ago after reading it was good for recording Fender-style clean amps. However, it seems like the capsule has become loose, and I haven't yet got around to sending it back to the USA for repair.

I started to think about buying a mic after reading an article on the DPA site about using their 4061 to record guitar amps.

My room is on the tiny side - maybe about 8ft square, and it's my home office. However, I like the sound when I'm playing, but I suppose that won't be the same as a mic would hear when positioned close to the speaker cone. The amp I'm using is about 5watts, and I'm not really over-driving it, so it's not running flat out, but it is a decent volume in the small room.

I think my recordings would be fairly basic - sometimes solo clean guitar. I've been playing without reverb or delay. I would like the recordings to sound natural, and (if possible) fairly 'big' and 'professional'.

A big mic on a heavy stand would get in the way, so I thought a smaller mic would be better. I bought a mic holder which clamps to the cab, and I think it could be used to hold a small-ish mic a little way off the grill. Otherwise, a small mic stand such as a kick drum or desktop stand mic stand might do the trick.

I am leaning more towards the 635A, which would allow me to experiment without breaking the bank. It's difficult to tell, but I thought its frequency response might be a decent match for what I'd be recording.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #4
Gear Head
 

My new favourite has been a Sony C48, smooth and clear. Pair it with a ribbon for a huge low end, or a 57/421 for rock tones
Old 2 weeks ago
  #5
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
I would recommend a Beyer MPC 67 boundary mic (currently available on ebay for $25) or a Neumann KM184 (stupidly expensive).

Just to give two great sounds at wildly different price points, that are not "normal."

The beyer is "half cardiod" so you set it sort of in front of the amp on the floor. My "secret weapon."
Old 2 weeks ago
  #6
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
The beyer is "half cardiod" so you set it sort of in front of the amp on the floor. My "secret weapon."
Thanks - I've just ordered one before I thought about it for too long!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #7
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
I would recommend a Beyer MPC 67 boundary mic (currently available on ebay for $25) ."
Well that certainly qualifies as "unusual".

I would think the EV 635 or any more "normal" dynamic or even a more standard condenser would be a better starter mic to learn about and work with mic'ing and placement and would make for a much better first mic.

A boundry mic can be an interesting oddity or extra but is not going to be all that good at reducing room sound if that might be something one wants.

Certainly cheap and fits the unusual requirement which I'm still not sure I understand the actual importance of here.

The SM57 is a studio standard and in my opinion it's ubiquitousness can make it a sensible place to begin to give someone new to recording an understanding of a tool that has and is used by so many people to record more guitar amps than probably any other mic ever.

Last edited by JLast; 2 weeks ago at 08:54 PM.. Reason: EV 635 not 636... fingers too big for phone
Old 2 weeks ago
  #8
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
I've used 635a on guitar amps and it works well. As mentioned, you will get a bit of a roomy sound. For a more focused sound, with some thump, you'll want to consider a cardioid mic. I really love Beyer M88 on amps, as well as various EV RE series mics. For a more pointed, in your face sound, the EV N/D408/438 or AKG D1000e work well.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #9
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLast View Post
Well that certainly qualifies as "unusual".

I would think the EV 636 or any more "normal" dynamic or even a more standard condenser would be a better starter mic to learn about and work with mic'ing and placement and would make for a much better first mic.

A boundry mic can be an interesting oddity or extra but is not going to be all that good at reducing room sound if that might be something one wants.

Certainly cheap and fits the unusual requirement which I'm still not sure I understand the actual importance of here.

The SM57 is a studio standard and in my opinion it's ubiquitousness can make it a sensible place to begin to give someone new to recording an understanding of a tool that has and is used by so many people to record more guitar amps than probably any other mic ever.
I was just following the topic of the thread. He bought one.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #10
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by deejayen View Post
Thanks - I've just ordered one before I thought about it for too long!
Very cool! Let me know if it works for you. I think it's a hidden gem of a microphone, very flat frequency response, Made In Germany. Doesn't sound like an SM57.

Really good on hand drums too.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #11
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
I went looking for the band where I used the 635a a lot on guitars. They are a garage rock band, but you can get a bit of an idea. The 635a is on rhythm guitars panned right on most (all?) of these songs. Gnu Kung Fu
Old 2 weeks ago
  #12
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
I was just following the topic of the thread. He bought one.
Not sure what you're reading but it looks like the OP bought the Beyer boundry mic not the EV 635 he was originally considering.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #13
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLast View Post
Not sure what you're reading but it looks like the OP bought the Beyer boundry mic not the EV 635 he was originally considering.
Why did you quote me if you're talking about an EV mic?

I was talking about the Beyer MPC 67 and he bought one.

I'm trying to end this back and forth it's not interesting to me.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #14
EV635a is a great mic for guitar - and lots of other things too. I have two, as well as an AT804 - very similar.

The 635a is great because while it is technically an omni - it doesn't sound like omni on a condenser because the rear of the capsule is blocked by the mic body.

I used a 635a on percussion with a live band (6 piece) and it worked great - the amount of rejection is surprising, and the bleed you get sounds good and is useful.

Hands down one of my favorite mics.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #15
Gear Maniac
 

Well, I'm just curious to try the MPC 67, and I knew that if I didn't buy it now I probably never would, especially as it's discontinued. It's obviously a bit different from the norm, and it appeals to me. If it gives me a usable sound it'll be great. I'll try to report back once I've tried it - it looks like it might be two or three weeks before it arrives.

I'm still interested in the EV 635 and other mics. I understand what you're saying about the SM57, so it might make sense to add that as a 'starting point'. I've learned that with audio gear you really need to try things out yourself, but pointers from those with a lot more experience are extremely helpful to close-in in the contenders.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #16
Lives for gear
 
Xander's Avatar
The AEA R92 is always my first choice for guitar cabs. I usually start by placing it an inch or two from the grill, smack dab in the middle of the dustcap. I rarely have to move it. It sound phenomenal. It has a tendency to tame the harshness you can get with many dynamic mics in the 2-4 kHz area. I would not call this mic dull, it has plenty of high end for tracking guitars. And if you want more high end, you can boost it without getting any ugly resonances. It also has a lot of meat, it never sounds too thin, as long as you keep it close. I use it on everything from overdriven Marshalls to clean Fenders.

However, if you're looking for something with lots of aggressive bite on a guitar cab, look elsewhere. An RE20 is a good alternative for that.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #17
Lives for gear
 
andychamp's Avatar
I found the 635a a bit too band-limited for amps, for my taste,, but another EV omni, the RE50, surprised me in that application.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #18
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
I love the 635A too but I mainly have used them for room mics. They do a great "vintagey vocal" thing too if you're in the mood.

A mic that is very similar to the SM57 but somehow different is the Shure 545SD. The voice coil is copper in the 545 vs. aluminum in the 57, this is one of the main differences.

I think it's a great electric guitar mic, less of the mid hump, a little brighter on the very top, than a 57. I use one on my Marshall 4x12 for the past while.

They are also $10 cheaper than the SM57. People rarely speak of them for some reason.

Apparently the Robert Plant vocal mic but I find it kind of "ugly" on vocals. At least on my own voice. I prefer the 57 for my vocal.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #19
Lives for gear
 

I'm not a big fan of 57s on most things. For guitars I like SM59s (if you can find one), EV -RE15, RE20, 635A, 664, 665, 666, 660 or PL6, Sennheiser 421, 441, 211 (another omni dynamic), Beyer M88. AKG D19....................and on and on and on. Just go buy some dynamic mics. They're all useful and usable.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #20
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by junkshop View Post
I'm not a big fan of 57s on most things. For guitars I like SM59s (if you can find one), EV -RE15, RE20, 635A, 664, 665, 666, 660 or PL6, Sennheiser 421, 441, 211 (another omni dynamic), Beyer M88. AKG D19....................and on and on and on. Just go buy some dynamic mics. They're all useful and usable.
great advice. Just buy a bunch of dynamic mics!

SM59 is pretty special, RE18 also. I mean, MD441 you listed a lot of amazing microphones.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #21
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
I love the 635A too but I mainly have used them for room mics. They do a great "vintagey vocal" thing too if you're in the mood.

A mic that is very similar to the SM57 but somehow different is the Shure 545SD. The voice coil is copper in the 545 vs. aluminum in the 57, this is one of the main differences.

I think it's a great electric guitar mic, less of the mid hump, a little brighter on the very top, than a 57. I use one on my Marshall 4x12 for the past while.

They are also $10 cheaper than the SM57. People rarely speak of them for some reason.

Apparently the Robert Plant vocal mic but I find it kind of "ugly" on vocals. At least on my own voice. I prefer the 57 for my vocal.

I also like 635a on vocals.

Also, while the SM7b sounds dull and meh on my voice, and I'm not nearly as into it as most people on GS, I *do* really like it's muffledness on a guitar amp!

Incidentally, I like the SM57 on voice, but *not* on guitar cab.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #22
AKG D40!



(Have one but have not used it on an amp)
Old 1 day ago
  #23
Gear Maniac
 

Well, the Beyerdynamic MPC 67 eventually turned up. It went missing for a couple of days after apparently having been delivered by the local courier, but they found it and delivered it today.

Unfortunately, it's not the version which was listed on the eBay advertisement. It was listed as an MPC 67, but the one I received is an MPC 67 RC which has an unusual 5 pin connector on the mic (a bit like a 5-pin mini XLR), and a cable which terminates in a 5-pin DIN plug on the other end. The MPC 67 RC must have extra pins for a remote control function, but I don't know what sort of gear it would connect to. I suppose I could try to find someone to make me an adaptor cable, but I don't really have time to look into it, plus it might work out quite expensive.

I suppose I'll just have to write it off, and go for one of the other mics suggested above!
Old 1 day ago
  #24
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
It is a 5 pin mini xlr, yes you need a custom cable. I use short 'adapter' cables to go from mini to full size XLR. I ignore the "RC" pins completely and just wire for normal balanced output.

It sounds like you are writing it off but if you can solder or find the right cable you are in business.

The other version has a 3 pin mini XLR, I have both kinds here.

Sometimes I forget that soldering throws a lot of people off.
Old 1 day ago
  #25
Here for the gear
I have got nice results out of my small 5W Tweed Champ with NoHype LRM-2 ribbon and Phoenix DSR preamp. I have also got a decent outcome with other preamps. It is a really great and versatile mic, very generously priced, one of my favorites, really good to take EQ.

As the pattern is figure 8, as most of the ribbons are, there are plenty of options to place it and find a balance between the room and the amp. If I want a really intimate sound out of the Champ, I bring it very close to the speaker and time to time even install a reflection filter behind to make it sound super dry and warm.
Old 13 hours ago
  #26
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
It is a 5 pin mini xlr, yes you need a custom cable. I use short 'adapter' cables to go from mini to full size XLR. I ignore the "RC" pins completely and just wire for normal balanced output.

It sounds like you are writing it off but if you can solder or find the right cable you are in business.

The other version has a 3 pin mini XLR, I have both kinds here.

Sometimes I forget that soldering throws a lot of people off.
Thanks for confirming the connectors, and that an adapter will work. I think I was just disappointed that I wasn't able to plug it in and go when I got home last night! I'll see if I can work out the pin-outs, and order up some plugs and cable. I don't really solder, but I could have an attempt at it, or try to find someone who could make a short lead for me.
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