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Is expensive gear still worth it?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #361
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayHeath View Post
REALLY looking forward to hearing more comments on the Heiserman H47tube - likely calls for an entirely separate thread. What specifically you chose to use it on for first listen - how it strikes you over time - etc.?


Waiting for more. . .

Ray H.

ha! OK Ray. I gotcha covered. I'll put up a Heiserman thread about the H47tube and we'll see if we can get some comments. I'll fill in the details of my first session with it - and I'll tag you. See you there.....
Old 3 weeks ago
  #362
It's Gone Full Circle ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennybro View Post
Actually two questions here ...

Do you need it?
No. You need quality spaces and monitoring, but given good artists, songs & engineer, a fine recording is possible with a handful of KSM32's & 57's, a few KT2A's, ASP800 & MOTU828, Logic on MacBook Pro, and a few other bits and pieces.

Low-quality artists, songs or engineer? Forget it. Abbey Road can't help. IMHO, that industry standard of which you speak, from the music-listening public POV, has far more to do with the talent of the people behind the gear than with the gear itself. That said, the best gear sure doesn't hurt.

... All the way back to my original posting about my big-band arranger-leader friend, agreeing that he could probably record a perfectly fine-sounding album with SM57s & 635As ... and a good engineer in a good room, of course.

'Cause he's got a talented band!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #363
Lives for gear
 
kennybro's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShelGef View Post
... All the way back to my original posting about my big-band arranger-leader friend, agreeing that he could probably record a perfectly fine-sounding album with SM57s & 635As ... and a good engineer in a good room, of course.

'Cause he's got a talented band!
There's that great story in Glyn John's book about the time they were suppose to record the Funk Bros. They were obsessing over gear afraid they couldn't get the Motown sound, and when the band started playing in the studio, there it was, regardless of the gear. Of course, all the gear was top shelf, but it was the musicians, not the gear, creating the sound. I'm sure those guys could have engineered that recording very satisfactorily with mid-level current gear. Probably even on a DAW, haha!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #364
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShelGef View Post
... All the way back to my original posting about my big-band arranger-leader friend, agreeing that he could probably record a perfectly fine-sounding album with SM57s & 635As ... and a good engineer in a good room, of course.

'Cause he's got a talented band!
The question that begs to be asked is... why doesn't he do it then? The cost savings alone should be reason enough yes?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #365
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alrod View Post
The question that begs to be asked is... why doesn't he do it then? The cost savings alone should be reason enough yes?
And the answer is simple from my perspective : Art deserves the absolute best you can give it.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #366
Probable Answer ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alrod View Post
The question that begs to be asked is... why doesn't he do it then? The cost savings alone should be reason enough yes?
Probable answer? "This is just the way it's generally done now" habit, to be honest with you.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #367
Perception is everything.

Use what inspires you and, if you do it for others, your clientele.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #368
Lives for gear
 
Lance Lawson's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennybro View Post
Actually two questions here...

Is expensive gear worth it?
Sure. This stuff sells in the low thousands of units. R&D, set up manufacturing, maintain quality control, pay workers, insure, advertise, etc... all very expensive. You want the best stuff out there? Pay for it.

Do you need it?
No. You need quality spaces and monitoring, but given good artists, songs & engineer, a fine recording is possible with a handful of KSM32's & 57's, a few KT2A's, ASP800 & MOTU828, Logic on MacBook Pro, and a few other bits and pieces.

Low-quality artists, songs or engineer? Forget it. Abbey Road can't help. IMHO, that industry standard of which you speak, from the music-listening public POV, has far more to do with the talent of the people behind the gear than with the gear itself. That said, the best gear sure doesn't hurt.

The thread OP asks whether expensive gear is worth it and not whether it is needed or not. There is a certain contingent that uses poor/cheap gear as a means of creating a sound for themselves. There are certain parallels in guitar playing. For decades there had been an industry standard of electric guitars that professionals used. In short the Gibson Les Paul and the Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster were played by 80-90% of performers. Getting a Les Paul or Fender was something nearly all up and coming players strived for. Today guitars like those Dan Electros which were one treated as almost a joke are wielded by big prominent names. So anything can come around and develop a value. But getting back to gear a great mic (read expensive) can do more to make credible recordings in a bad space that a cheap mic can do to make credible recordings in a good space. Now this is a gray area now where affordable gear can make credible recordings but those pieces are not common. There exists microphones like the BM-800 which sells for next to nothing and compared to previous generations of cheap mics it sounds passable in a basic way. But try having a studio charging real world money and attempting to lure clients with $20 microphones. It'll be a hard sell. Lastly expensive (read professional) gear is far more reliable and will have a service/repair system in place. Many of the new affordable pieces will end up as landfill once repair becomes needed. So there are many levels where initial expense become absorbed not only by quality performance but in being able to go the long haul. It's why there are still thousands of Neumann U47's still in service.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #369
Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
And the answer is simple from my perspective : Art deserves the absolute best you can give it.
Haven't commented on this thread, but will say this is THE answer!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #370
Lives for gear
 
kennybro's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Lawson View Post
The thread OP asks whether expensive gear is worth it and not whether it is needed or not. There is a certain contingent that uses poor/cheap gear as a means of creating a sound for themselves. There are certain parallels in guitar playing. For decades there had been an industry standard of electric guitars that professionals used. In short the Gibson Les Paul and the Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster were played by 80-90% of performers. Getting a Les Paul or Fender was something nearly all up and coming players strived for. Today guitars like those Dan Electros which were one treated as almost a joke are wielded by big prominent names. So anything can come around and develop a value. But getting back to gear a great mic (read expensive) can do more to make credible recordings in a bad space that a cheap mic can do to make credible recordings in a good space. Now this is a gray area now where affordable gear can make credible recordings but those pieces are not common. There exists microphones like the BM-800 which sells for next to nothing and compared to previous generations of cheap mics it sounds passable in a basic way. But try having a studio charging real world money and attempting to lure clients with $20 microphones. It'll be a hard sell. Lastly expensive (read professional) gear is far more reliable and will have a service/repair system in place. Many of the new affordable pieces will end up as landfill once repair becomes needed. So there are many levels where initial expense become absorbed not only by quality performance but in being able to go the long haul. It's why there are still thousands of Neumann U47's still in service.
Sure. The question isn't, "Are professionals using cheap gear to create good sounding recordings?"
In most cases, they are not. There is simply no reason for them to do that. They use expensive gear, because it's reliable, sounds great, looks great, and there are expectations when people book a high level studio. You don't expect to go into Air, and see MXL mics. That would be like "WTF? What am I paying for?" Also, as artists, we expect a U87 to sound great, but we don't expect that from a iSK Pearl. If that sounds great, it's more of a surprise than an expectation.

Actually, an SM7 can do more to make credible recordings in a bad space than will a U87, for well-known reasons. And $400 for a mic is accessible by just about anyone, so the issue becomes a bit clouded. Is SM7 high level to mid level? But that's another discussion.

But no matter what the pros are using and what you find in high level studios, the fact remains that one can make recordings that people love on less expensive gear. Engineers who think they are being held back by their mid-level gear need to work on their chops. There are no shortage of disappointed engineers who find that their vocal recordings sound almost exactly the same after they get that U87. Only then, do the smart ones go on the hunt for real solutions. The less smart ones say, "U87s are highly overrated."

All that said, I totally agree that most high-level gear is worth the investment, if you can do that without going hungry or not paying your kid's insurance premium.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #371
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
I'm only helping you make your argument if you're a hipster snob Which you appear to be!

You asked for iconic. The Beatles will be on your mum's iPod, and much of their output might now be considered a little cheesy, and it couldn't be MORE mainstream. Doesn't make it any less iconic. Kings of Leon were indie cred when they first emerged; later they crossed into mainstream (as I said, they did at least one album pre Sex on Fire there; "Closer" is also a kind of iconic song if less well known).

At this point it's kind of futile to debate with someone who thinks their taste is absolute. Get over yourself.

Like I said - show me one example of a record that sounds like "a million dollars" that was done in a bedroom and I'll be impressed.

That NMH recording sounds like a $150 recording, however great the songs are. You could do that in Blackbird, in a demo studio, in a lounge and get a similar sound given the right ethos.

You've been thoroughly proven wrong, and all you can do is sling slightly pathetic digs. Well done. I think there's a coffee shop missing it's barista...you'd best get to work.
You’ve resorted to name calling now? Alright I’ll leave it alone. You’re obviously offended by someone that does not agree with you. I wanna say that was not my intention. Also, that I wouldn’t have commented if I didn’t have plenty of experience with embarrassingly expensive gear. I believe, that in 2019 a decent room with enough inputs for what you do, can make amazing records. Your biggest expense be your computer and monitors. It may take experience but so what. So stop acting like you’ve got to have a real studio to have real results. That ship sailed forever ago. Finally, I’ve also (admittedly only once) heard a master from landr that I liked more than the final. Don’t you think they’re gonna figure that out too until it’s not once but all the time? Mastering used to cost a fortune and it’s still expensive but my point is even if some really expensive gear is worth it at the moment, it’s not going to be very much longer.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #372
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth House Guest View Post
You’ve resorted to name calling now? Alright I’ll leave it alone. You’re obviously offended by someone that does not agree with you. I wanna say that was not my intention. Also, that I wouldn’t have commented if I didn’t have plenty of experience with embarrassingly expensive gear. I believe, that in 2019 a decent room with enough inputs for what you do, can make amazing records. Your biggest expense be your computer and monitors. It may take experience but so what. So stop acting like you’ve got to have a real studio to have real results. That ship sailed forever ago. Finally, I’ve also (admittedly only once) heard a master from landr that I liked more than the final. Don’t you think they’re gonna figure that out too until it’s not once but all the time? Mastering used to cost a fortune and it’s still expensive but my point is even if some really expensive gear is worth it at the moment, it’s not going to be very much longer.
lol wut!?

A studio isn't merely a collection of expensive equipment, but most importantly a space designed to sound great. If that aspect isn't there, no amount of gear will solve that. Everybody knows that.

Not sure what point you're trying to make here. Even a lot of expensive gear isn't that expensive these days. Adjust for inflation and prices for decent gear was outright disgusting compared to today.

At the end of day, if what you earn from music using whatever piece is gear is more than what it cost, then it has justified its cost and we're discussing the sort of equipment that has been proven to last decades.

At the end of the day, the difference between a £200 mic & a £2k one is 2 maybe 3 months saving up in a minimum wage job. The idea it is completely unaffordable and out of reach for mere mortals is ridiculous.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #373
Lives for gear
 
Lance Lawson's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennybro View Post
Sure. The question isn't, "Are professionals using cheap gear to create good sounding recordings?"
In most cases, they are not. There is simply no reason for them to do that. They use expensive gear, because it's reliable, sounds great, looks great, and there are expectations when people book a high level studio. You don't expect to go into Air, and see MXL mics.
Is there any way of cataloguing successful artists who specifically use cheap gear with the intent of making quality recordings and are not making recordings to showcase sound cheapness. Ages ago there were these Farfiza Organs that garage bands used in lu of not being able to buy better quality organs. Eventually the Farfisa sound became a kind of standard and acquiring credibility. Steely Dan used one for what can be described as effect. In the album notes the effect is quoted as "cheap organ". Cheap/non professional gear can make successful recordings but the odds against it are steep.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #374
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Lawson View Post
Is there any way of cataloguing successful artists who specifically use cheap gear with the intent of making quality recordings and are not making recordings to showcase sound cheapness. Ages ago there were these Farfiza Organs that garage bands used in lu of not being able to buy better quality organs. Eventually the Farfisa sound became a kind of standard and acquiring credibility. Steely Dan used one for what can be described as effect. In the album notes the effect is quoted as "cheap organ". Cheap/non professional gear can make successful recordings but the odds against it are steep.
Well, my thoughts on it were all the artist in the 90's who took cheap synths (because that was all they could afford) and made a lot of now classic songs with them.

I mean the Yamaha TX81Z and the Roland TB-303 were totally disposal back then.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #375
Lives for gear
 
mamm7215's Avatar
Yes it’s worth it for me...

Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
And the answer is simple from my perspective : Art deserves the absolute best you can give it.
And THAT’S why I just pulled the trigger on a Silver Bullet (thanks DrBill and BradM). My higher end pieces HAVE made a difference in my setup. P3EX, Vari-mu, Xfilter, N72s, (soon)Silver Bullet...Yes I feel it’s worth it, it’s expensive for a reason, the value’s built in. To be fair, I also have “cheaper”pieces I use all the time, too (klark stuff-pretty good) and I’m just recording myself, but I feel it does make a difference. Maybe the title should read “Is high-end” gear still worth it. Expensive doesn’t necessarily mean good.

Last edited by mamm7215; 3 weeks ago at 05:01 AM..
Old 3 weeks ago
  #376
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamm7215 View Post
And THAT’S why I just pulled the trigger on a Silver Bullet(thanks DrBill and Brad). My higher end pieces HAVE made a difference in my setup. P3EX, Vari-mu, Xfilter, N72s, (soon)Silver Bullet...Yes it’s worth it, it’s expensive for a reason, the value’s built in.
Awesome!! Enjoy!!! I use the SB with a Vari-Mu as well, and that's a KILLER combo IMO. Shout out if you have any questions. The manual is informative, and a kind of fun read. It's on the LTL website.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #377
Lives for gear
 
mamm7215's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
Awesome!! Enjoy!!! I use the SB with a Vari-Mu as well, and that's a KILLER combo IMO. Shout out if you have any questions. The manual is informative, and a kind of fun read. It's on the LTL website.
Thanks so much DrBill. Do you have the vari-mu on the SB inserts or just to their own jacks on a patch bay? Was wondering about cabling since the inserts themselves are unbalanced.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Lawson View Post
Is there any way of cataloguing successful artists who specifically use cheap gear with the intent of making quality recordings and are not making recordings to showcase sound cheapness. Ages ago there were these Farfiza Organs that garage bands used in lu of not being able to buy better quality organs. Eventually the Farfisa sound became a kind of standard and acquiring credibility. Steely Dan used one for what can be described as effect. In the album notes the effect is quoted as "cheap organ". Cheap/non professional gear can make successful recordings but the odds against it are steep.
Elliott Smith’s main guitar was a cheap Yamaha acoustic from the 70s. I believe he continued using it even after acquiring much more expensive guitars. I think I read his reasoning was the sound but given how complex his arrangements could be, it probably had more to do with the feel after so many years.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #379
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamm7215 View Post
Thanks so much DrBill. Do you have the vari-mu on the SB inserts or just to their own jacks on a patch bay? Was wondering about cabling since the inserts themselves are unbalanced.
I run the VM before or after. Mostly before for mastering. The unbalanced thing shouldn't be an issue though if you decide you want it on the inserts.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #380
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth House Guest View Post
Elliott Smith’s main guitar was a cheap Yamaha acoustic from the 70s.
Yeah, but he was recording at Capitol (see my list above), so....great gear can make even cheap Yamaha's sound good.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #381
Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
Yeah, but he was recording at Capitol (see my list above), so....great gear can make even cheap Yamaha's sound good.
Which one is the capital record? XO I’m guessing? I thought a lot of his material was in the studio he built with Larry Crane. I know he recorded his first 2 albums using two 4 track cassette machines he lined up by hitting play on them simultaneously (which Is nuts.) and his last album was his home studio I think. Maybe the guitar just did sound good. Wouldn’t better gear expose cheap instruments in some cases? This is stupid also, because there’s no way of knowing which guitars he used for each song. I just know the Yamaha was a constant.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #382
Lives for gear
Well there's home studio's and there's "home" studio's.

Sting recorded one of my favourite albums and one of my reference recordings for sound quality "Ten Sumners Tales" in the front room of his Jacobean mansion in Wiltshire!

But luckily, he did have the budget for enough mics to properly capture Vinnie's kit
Old 3 weeks ago
  #383
Quote:
Originally Posted by hughshouse View Post
For every free standing commercial space of considerable size that houses most of the vintage recording gear found in 20th century top quality studios, hundreds of smaller project studios of varying quality now exist. In my post #325 I appropriately used the term "Most" alluding to a majority of the majority of existing recording endeavors today. This is a common sense assessment with out supporting empirical data however in the absence of any credible data to the contrary I believe my opinion stands as a sound one.
Yes - I did take "most" as to mean "most people making music others will hear"! Wasn't really thinking of the demo/home studio/bedroom market. Of course I use samples, and sometimes I'll program a "live" kit. I was really reacting to the idea bands go in and record with e-kits. That doesn't happen...well, ever for something that needs live drums.


Quote:
If I was actively involved in classical music production I would still own and maintain a suitable grand piano for studio work. However for the acoustic Americana genre where I reside the Yamaha stage piano sampler is much more than sufficient: it never needs to be tuned and is highly portable with pro std. +4 L&R direct outs that eliminates the need to create isolation for appropriate micing. A vintage 1936 herring bone or a Loyd Loar mandolin or many other quality acoustic instruments do not present similar physical problems to the piano or drum kits so I do not use samples in lieu of these instrumental performances.
i'd have thought americana would cry out for live drums? anything brushes is really hard to fake with samples for example...again, I'm not averse to using piano samples for anything that's not a critical part (or Hammond - I have both "Real" instruments and won't always record them, going for samples depending on who the player is and what the role is).

Quote:
The shrinking budgets of todays recording world is driven by many market realities but one of the biggest changes is in the layering practice of passing around WAV files to top session players rather than scheduling studio time for their tracking. Most of Nashville's top session players have in house capability to contribute their tracks from their own project space thus avoiding wasted travel and set-up time.
Hugh
I've used and would use session musos remotely, but given the choice for a project I'm producing, I'd always want to be there; you're not really "producing" if not. Again, it depends on where you're located I suppose.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth House Guest View Post
You’ve resorted to name calling now? Alright I’ll leave it alone.
It was a joke, based on what could be considered a cliched hipster opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth House Guest View Post
You’re obviously offended by someone that does not agree with you. I wanna say that was not my intention. Also, that I wouldn’t have commented if I didn’t have plenty of experience with embarrassingly expensive gear.
I'm in no way offended - I'm doing just fine with decent enough gear, I know what it can and can't do and I've made enough records both ways to know what is needed. It was just the absurdity of the statement and conclusions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth House Guest View Post
I believe, that in 2019 a decent room with enough inputs for what you do, can make amazing records. Your biggest expense be your computer and monitors. It may take experience but so what. So stop acting like you’ve got to have a real studio to have real results. That ship sailed forever ago.
I think if you look back, you're fighting a straw man argument. I never said anything against any of this. Let's mention it one more time:

You mentioned Blackbird, a well known well stocked studio where, if it's possible to do it in a studio, one should be able to do it there!

You then namechecked a (for the genre) popular lo-fi record.

You stated that since this record was made with cheap gear (notably missing out the one piece of gear that was pretty significant and wasn't cheap I might mention!), that no-one needs expensive gear to make any sort of record, and that big studios were pointless.

I merely pointed out that that conclusion was daft, that whilst I fully agreed you didn't need a studio to make a lo-fi record if that was your bag, many people didn't want to make lo-fi records, and making something a bit better sounding (if that's your aesthetic) is harder on cheap gear and average location.

It then descended into a debate on what's a more "iconic record"..which as many of us have pointed out, purely comes down to your taste, although influence can be measured as well and as I pointed out, a massively more popular record that's still musically credible HAS to be "more influential" if a magnitude more people have heard it.

You won't find me disagreeing you don't *need* a studio like Blackbird in many cases, that music tech is better than ever before, and that you can do a lot at home that was inconceivable a few years ago. We all work like this; I typically track most stuff in a decent sized studio, edit at my kitchen table, overdub, add production and mix at my little studio, and check/tweak back in the big room...and hopefully make productions that sound like they were done 100% in the big room!

The advantage of a big studio comes with ease of use, flexibility, and generally not having to compromise to do things. You might have all the inputs you need, but if your room is honky, the bassist is in the lounge and can't see the drummer in the kitchen, the guitarist has to keep running up and down stairs to press record for each take, and you have to pack up by dinnertime 'cos mum needs the kitchen, you can't tell me that's going to make a better record (or even recording experience) than somewhere set up properly?

You also won't convince me that lo-fi is all we need for every genre.

So yeah...if that's what you think I'm arguing, you're wrong. go back and read your original post in this thread.

Quote:
Finally, I’ve also (admittedly only once) heard a master from landr that I liked more than the final. Don’t you think they’re gonna figure that out too until it’s not once but all the time? Mastering used to cost a fortune and it’s still expensive but my point is even if some really expensive gear is worth it at the moment, it’s not going to be very much longer.
Even a stopped clock is right twice a day, and AI is getting better all the time.

I use my ME as a QC check, a reference point and a stylistic enhancement. If I just wanted to make something loud, I could do that myself. He actually makes a positive contribution to the sound (and makes adjustments when asked!).

Oh, and he unifies the project - making tracks flow and fit, subjectively loud enough and adjusts spacing if I need him to etc.

When LANDR can do that, it'll be a mastering service. Til then, it's a louderizing service.

And then it's on to replacing the mix engineers! Once they can program taste into AI at least.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #385
Gear Head
 
booger1000's Avatar
 

Yes. High end gear can improve your sound dramatically
Old 3 weeks ago
  #386
Lives for gear
 
kennybro's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Lawson View Post
Is there any way of cataloguing successful artists who specifically use cheap gear with the intent of making quality recordings and are not making recordings to showcase sound cheapness. Ages ago there were these Farfiza Organs that garage bands used in lu of not being able to buy better quality organs. Eventually the Farfisa sound became a kind of standard and acquiring credibility. Steely Dan used one for what can be described as effect. In the album notes the effect is quoted as "cheap organ".
Sure, but cheap sound sources are a different discussion from cheap studio gear.

Last night, I brought a '59 Tele (about $20k) and a Squire Strat (paid €120 last year) to my gig last night. Played the Tele two sets and the Strat for one; both were fine. The Strat beat the Tele on stuff like Sultans. I have recorded with both. As with recording gear, the quality gap between inexpensive and expensive instruments has narrowed massively in recent years. A lot of cheap drum kits sound great today. A $600 PDP kit can sound amazing. This was not the case 40 years ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Lawson View Post
Cheap/non professional gear can make successful recordings but the odds against it are steep.
Depends on your goal. Supro amps were considered student gear when Page recorded with one.

With instruments and source gear, when anyone famous uses a cheap thing successfully, it becomes iconic. Auerbach, White, etc...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #387
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
My main guitar right now is a $200 Agile les paul special. It does have $200 pickups in it though. Neck is fast and solid, frets are perfect, stays in tune, intonates well.

The point is "budget gear" is built approximately 1,000,000 times better than it was decades ago. Just rephrasing what kennybro said. This applies to almost any category of gear including formerly unattainable stuff like good microphones and recording systems/interfaces. hughshouse talks about this a lot.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #388
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
And the answer is simple from my perspective : Art deserves the absolute best you can give it.
Including your best Autotune!
Chris
Old 3 weeks ago
  #389
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
My main guitar right now is a $200 Agile les paul special. It does have $200 pickups in it though. Neck is fast and solid, frets are perfect, stays in tune, intonates well.

The point is "budget gear" is built approximately 1,000,000 times better than it was decades ago.
except for the pickups, apparently
Old 3 weeks ago
  #390
Yes, Precisely

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
The point is "budget gear" is built approximately 1,000,000 times better than it was decades ago. Just rephrasing what kennybro said. This applies to almost any category of gear including formerly unattainable stuff like good microphones and recording systems/interfaces. hughshouse talks about this a lot.
Yes!
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