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How to made GOOD (even GREAT!) Singers sound better-Without Pitch Correction!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #61
Lives for gear
 

Sinatra always read the whole song, as a poem first. I can imagine that as being hilarious sometimes, with the songs nowadays.

But it could "break the ice too"!
Chris
Old 3 weeks ago
  #62
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changeng's Avatar
Well, to each his own. Done line by line, the singer doesn't have to memorize words, just melodies. Plus, it's not a rigid rule. If they want to do a few lines at a time for flow (especially if there are lots of words ) then sure! But I find it very VERY rare that running through an entire song brings any real results - just wasted time and a singer hearing how so-so their performance was. Again, once the whole song is recorded, tackling the spots that don't vibe properly can be approached - maybe with a method that evolved over the course of the piece-by-piece recording.

Also, I record all soft parts, then all loud parts. Not together, unless they share lines. This way you can dial in any proximity/preamp/compression differences.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #63
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Driscoll View Post
Wouldn't several takes a section at a time (first the verse, then the chorus, then the next verse, and then maybe go back and re-do the first chorus once the singer has a few tries under his or her belt) get the same results once the best bits are comped together? I think a line at a time might feel too clinical, whereas with a whole section, at least there's time for the singer to get into the part.
This works really well sometimes. If I'm doing this I do verses and then choruses and then the bridge.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #64
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by bambamboom View Post
You are technically correct, however the IMPLIED tone of this thread is about the things BEYOND the default "go to" vocal processing (comp, verb, delay, de-ess, eq etc). The other stuff has been done to death, but in the direction this thread has gone it is far from pointless.
You have a point there.

Could not resist
Old 3 weeks ago
  #65
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by changeng View Post
Well, to each his own. Done line by line, the singer doesn't have to memorize words, just melodies. Plus, it's not a rigid rule. If they want to do a few lines at a time for flow (especially if there are lots of words ) then sure! But I find it very VERY rare that running through an entire song brings any real results - just wasted time and a singer hearing how so-so their performance was. Again, once the whole song is recorded, tackling the spots that don't vibe properly can be approached - maybe with a method that evolved over the course of the piece-by-piece recording.

Also, I record all soft parts, then all loud parts. Not together, unless they share lines. This way you can dial in any proximity/preamp/compression differences.
Good idea about the loud and quiet parts being decided separately.
Old 5 days ago
  #66
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by changeng View Post
Well, to each his own. Done line by line, the singer doesn't have to memorize words, just melodies. Plus, it's not a rigid rule. If they want to do a few lines at a time for flow (especially if there are lots of words ) then sure! But I find it very VERY rare that running through an entire song brings any real results - just wasted time and a singer hearing how so-so their performance was. Again, once the whole song is recorded, tackling the spots that don't vibe properly can be approached - maybe with a method that evolved over the course of the piece-by-piece recording.

Also, I record all soft parts, then all loud parts. Not together, unless they share lines. This way you can dial in any proximity/preamp/compression differences.

I usually have the singer do the whole song through a couple times... maybe three or four times depending. No stopping or starting. Just go through it warts and all. (I'm not rigid about it. If they have a trainwreck moment I'll stop and restart, for instance).

After that I have them come in and listen to each take and analyze... try to pick out the good & the bad moments.

From there we do sections. Or line-by-line if need be.

Pretty typical that one of the initial "whole song" takes comprises the bulk of the final comp, with the line-by-line takes filling in a line or two or three.


As for extreme loud to soft parts... I used to do what you suggest above until I got a Townsend Labs Sphere mic. Now I can control all that stuff in post without having to break the session apart. That mic just straight up rules.
Old 5 days ago
  #67
Gear Guru
I find one thing that helps is finding the right key to fit my (non pro) voice. A half step in either direction can make a huge difference, especially if I want to jump an octave.....
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