The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Least objectionable digital piano
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
standup's Avatar
Least objectionable digital piano

If you had a project that needed a decent-sounding piano, but had to use a digital piano, what would you pick?

I have a Casio Privia. Sounds like a piano, but there must be better ones out there. Is the piano plugi in Pro Tools any better?

I may have to borrow or rent something.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
Here for the gear
 
al_net77's Avatar
What kind of music is it?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #3
Gear Addict
it really depends what you are looking for, tone? playability, expressiveness?

i have the roland v-piano. you can buy actually a real nice piano for that same amnt as well. But if its about tone, you can go with various sampled instruments using your own Casio. Pianoteq is also pretty sweet. Fairly affordable with some really great sounding free instruments like harpichords etc for free too.

I think you need to be more specific, since there are so many options and budgets. Nowadays, its hard to find really bad sounding digital pianos, but there are still differences. All also got different sound flavours as well.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
standup's Avatar
Thus project is kind of folk jazz-y. It could use a Steinway grand really.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #5
Here for the gear
 
al_net77's Avatar
Piano solo or not? Budget?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Farmboy presents's Avatar
My korg sv1 has nice piano sounds and the keyboard feels amazeballs, to me.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #7
Gear Maniac
 
standup's Avatar
This is ensemble playing — upright bass, piano, drums, guitar.

I’m not buying anything, but need to rent or borrow something locally for this recording.

Or just use the Casio, or use the Casio to play a plugin. Casio has weighted keys, it’s not awful.

I’m the bass player, just need to coordinate this.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #8
Gear Addict
Hm, you mention recording. How serious does the recording need to be? I mean, Steinway grand or Casio DP is a difference ;-)
Old 4 weeks ago
  #9
Lives for gear
You can make the Casio work with the right finagling. Maybe something like reamp with some good mics, a chamber reverb, etc. I depends on how prominent in the mix it will be, but for an ensemble, the casio or stock plug ins would be fine in a dense mix
Old 4 weeks ago
  #10
Gear Addict
 

I have a wonderful Nord Piano 4, which replaced my Roland V-Piano, zero regrets, to me a big step up in sound, options and portability.

Being very impressed with the NP4, I would gladly add a Nord Grand to allow both piano and other independent instrument samples during live events.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Tommy-boy's Avatar
 

Anything by Kuzweil or Roland
Old 4 weeks ago
  #12
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by StevenLMorgan View Post
I have a wonderful Nord Piano 4, which replaced my Roland V-Piano, zero regrets, to me a big step up in sound, options and portability.

Being very impressed with the NP4, I would gladly add a Nord Grand to allow both piano and other independent instrument samples during live events.
Just out of curiosity, why changed the V-Piano away? I know its too heavy for touring I guess, but there are probably more reasons.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #13
Gear Nut
 

I use a Yamaha s80 love it I just inherited a Privia after a sucessful dead key repair. I like the action on the Privia better sounds fine. the only thing I'm missing is the modulation wheel and some of the sounds. Playing out I would bring the casio cause it weighs a lot less.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #14
Lives for gear
 
Crazy4Jazz's Avatar
 

I have a Steinway grand. If you are in or near NYC you’re welcome.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #15
Lives for gear
 
Crazy4Jazz's Avatar
 

Just for the record, when my piano is freshly tuned it beats any digital. But with careful tone shaping a great digital can sound good. Not the same touch, dynamics, etc. but can work well. Remember that in the end everything is a “recording”.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #16
Lives for gear
 
Oldone's Avatar
Keyscape here with a midi controller. I own a bunch but this one fits in a track in an authentic way. Also have a Roland JV1080 but it's a bit dated in its sound. Gets occasional use however. 2nd behind Keyscape would be Alicia Keys piano. Between those two it covers a host of song types.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #17
Gear Addict
 

There was something about the V-Piano sound that was not to my taste but the bigger issue was the weight.

The good news is that I sold the V-Piano for what I paid, (bought used from a well known jazz artist), after two years and spent the same on the Nord Piano 4.

Have a listen to the new Nord Silver Grand and others in the huge Nord library. Fantastic library of samples as mentioned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gitaarwerk View Post
Just out of curiosity, why changed the V-Piano away? I know its too heavy for touring I guess, but there are probably more reasons.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #18
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

One thing to be aware of: unless it's been custom-mapped, the mapping of every electronic piano or sample package that I've heard is very low-left/high-right. Which, due to the way the strings cross, isn't even the way a real piano sounds from the POV of the player (even though it looks like it should).

Just speaking personally, this drives me bonkers. Especially with people who use close to the entire 88. Who turn out to be the people who can really play, the classical folks and jazzers.

A typical rock player, though, might keep their two hands parked fairly close together and slightly south of center the whole time, in which case it doesn't bug me so much. But I'll still swing the panning in significantly.

To me, this is the main "tell" that lets you know it's not a real piano, and it's something you might want to keep an ear peeled for.

Last edited by Brent Hahn; 4 weeks ago at 07:21 PM..
Old 4 weeks ago
  #19
Gear Guru
 

on a recent project where the band was tracked live in a space that did not have a workable piano, we sent the MIDI from the session to one of those Disklavier outfits. They send the MIDI to their real piano, and record it with microphones and send you back the .wavs. The guy we used gave us 4 mics with our choice of positions.

you could even edit your MIDI before sending it off if you wanted to.

FWIW, plenty of digital pianos and piano libraries sound perfectly fine in a mix. As long as you don't A/B it directly with the real thing.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #20
Lives for gear
 
DirkP's Avatar
 

The few real piano players I know - one has studied piano - prefer Yamaha Clavinovas and / or Roland FP pianos if they can't play a real one.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #21
I’d defer to one of the more experienced perspectives above, but I can say that upgrading from my privia to my nord stage 2 ex was a huge step up in sound and feel.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #22
Lives for gear
 
toledo3's Avatar
 

From the original post, it sounds like using your current keyboard with a plugin is a viable route, given this is mainly a recording setup?

Take a look at Waves Grand Rhapsody, especially when it’s on sale (like now). With the different mic setups they used, you can really get something that fits most occasions and can standup very well against “real” instruments. Blows my Roland XP80+expansions and Yamaha motif synths out of the water sound quality wise, as well as a few other VIs I have that usually cost a bit more. It was pretty surprising.

Last edited by toledo3; 4 weeks ago at 02:22 PM..
Old 4 weeks ago
  #23
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by themiracle View Post
I’d defer to one of the more experienced perspectives above, but I can say that upgrading from my privia to my nord stage 2 ex was a huge step up in sound and feel.
I don't know if yours is one, but many Nords have loud, clacky keyboards. Only matters, though, if the player also sings.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #24
Lives for gear
For ultimate sound, the plugins are the best piano SOUNDS. For jazz I’d look at Synthogy Ivory, Spectrasonics Keyscape, and XLN Audio Addictive Keys. Addictive keys is very easy to run/use and has a lot of nice options, and the other two are slightly more realistic sampling and pure awesome tones.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #25
Here for the gear
 
al_net77's Avatar
I think that if you don't want to buy anything your best bet would be to use your Privia to record the midi and then send it to someone who does render with a great VST.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #26
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by al_net77 View Post
I think that if you don't want to buy anything your best bet would be to use your Privia to record the midi and then send it to someone who does render with a great VST.
The Privia is big with the classical crowd. Trouble is that they're so lightweight, with an aggressive player they need to be strapped down to the stand. Lengthwise.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #27
Lives for gear
 

This question presents hundreds of variables that are impossible to quantify into a simple, single answer. IMO there are many reasons the Yamaha motif, and it's siblings, has become ubiquitous live and studio pro gear. Dependable, portable sonic response for digital recording and S R has become the primary factor in most piano decisions today.
Hugh
Old 4 weeks ago
  #28
Gear Maniac
 
standup's Avatar
The disclavier option sounds like a possibility. I’m working on scheduling the recording with a studio that has a Steinway B. Digital piano is an emergency fallback.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #29
Lives for gear
 
soundmodel's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by standup View Post
If you had a project that needed a decent-sounding piano, but had to use a digital piano, what would you pick?

I have a Casio Privia. Sounds like a piano, but there must be better ones out there. Is the piano plugi in Pro Tools any better?

I may have to borrow or rent something.
The Mini Grand that comes with Pro Tools is actually decent, if you process it a bit. Like EQ and a bit of reverb.

Depends on stylistic needs though. It sounds like piano, but it may not sound like a "piano sound" that you want.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
One thing to be aware of: unless it's been custom-mapped, the mapping of every electronic piano or sample package that I've heard is very low-left/high-right. Which, due to the way the strings cross, isn't even the way a real piano sounds from the POV of the player (even though it looks like it should).

Just speaking personally, this drives me bonkers. Especially with people who use close to the entire 88. Who turn out to be the people who can really play, the classical folks and jazzers.

A typical rock player, though, might keep their two hands parked fairly close together and slightly south of center the whole time, in which case it doesn't bug me so much. But I'll still swing the panning in significantly.

To me, this is the main "tell" that lets you know it's not a real piano, and it's something you might want to keep an ear peeled for.
i.e you narrow down/reduce the stereo width of sampled pianos?
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump