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Most useful mixing trick you learned from pros
Old 4 weeks ago
  #211
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Space1999's Avatar
 

Regarding auto EQ moves, it’s really impossible to say that a certain frequency always sucks and needs to be cut. There is a truth in saying that arrangement is everything.

As well, you can use ducking to get a bass and kick to work together. Just set up a gate on the bass triggered by the kick. You don’t want it to close all the way, just reduce the bass by a few dB.

This also works on vocals vs a really dense music bed or for a solo instrument. Use your imagination.

I still come from the “ringing out an EQ” crowd. Whose mantra is boost your EQ and sweep around for the awful stuff and cut. The main objective is to give every instrument a frequency related home.

The most powerful guitar sounds are the sound of the guitar properly sculpted with filters and a bass playing with it. The guitar or guitars don’t step into the bass’ bottom end and they don’t screw up the vocal and cymbals by filtering the guitar at around 6k.

Pat
Old 4 weeks ago
  #212
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuieve View Post
You do it if your guitars are dull and not cutting through not always. Why does everyone think that every tip posted here is "ALWAYS". You do it when it needs to be done. You try and see if it works. These are just possible easy solutions to very common problems, not mandatory processes.

I said that a few times in this thread: techniques that work more often than they don't. You try, if it works, use it, if not, don't use it. Nobody's holding a gun to your head.

1400Hz is the area where there's rarely anything useful so boosting a little supposed to add brightness without clouding anything else. But if you do have something else in there, of course be careful with it.

Just common sense.
Maybe he misread and thought you said 14 kHz? To me the 1.4 kHz region is great for adding presence to an electric guitar sound, but not a “shiny” sound.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #213
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by adampaulson1217 View Post
Maybe he misread and thought you said 14 kHz? To me the 1.4 kHz region is great for adding presence to an electric guitar sound, but not a “shiny” sound.
Many guitar amps don't reproduce much of anything higher than 5k.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #214
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Many guitar amps don't reproduce much of anything higher than 5k.
That’s true, but you can get frequencies over 10 kHz with DI’d guitar which produces that shiny quality. I was just confused at calling 1.4 kHz shiny.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #215
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
a 10K, 14K whatever boost on something like a guitar will still produce brightness, because there's "stuff" up there at a low level, and the bottom end of a big shelf boost will reach down into the mids

at least that is my experience

Andrew Scheps is real big on boosting 1.5K on guitars right now, he talks about it in interviews, to get them to cut through or something

you can boost a voice there too for the same reason sometimes, for intelligibility in a busy mix
Old 4 weeks ago
  #216
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
a 10K, 14K whatever boost on something like a guitar will still produce brightness, because there's "stuff" up there at a low level, and the bottom end of a big shelf boost will reach down into the mids

at least that is my experience

Andrew Scheps is real big on boosting 1.5K on guitars right now, he talks about it in interviews, to get them to cut through or something

you can boost a voice there too for the same reason sometimes, for intelligibility in a busy mix
I’ve found it as kind of a sweet spot for boosting electrics that arent cutting enough, without getting in the way of other elements in the mix.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #217
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There wasn't 'one trick".. there were hundreds of small
Old 4 weeks ago
  #218
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ionian's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Space1999 View Post
Ionian, my friend, thank you for the correction. I had to think about it a second. I was confusing beats for measures. So yes there are 4 quarter note beats in a measure of 4/4. And half of a quarter note is an eighth note.

Thank you for catching that and for the new formula! It sure beats my backassward equation! LOL

Man, thanks again. It is awesome to have people of your experience, demure and caliber here in GS.

Pat
Hey Pat - It's all good! I figured after outlining your math equation you probably got all the numbers turned around! I think I did too when I read it!

The equation was something I actually picked up in a studio from an engineer when I was hanging out after some session work and it wasn't even for delays! He told he that he did it so that he could set the release on certain compressors of his as close to the tempo as possible right off the bat, and then adjust from there to change the groove or swing.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #219
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Space1999's Avatar
 

I was messing with Logic Pro X one day and I thought everything about the drums sounded really good. I was using one of the robo-drummers.

So I started digging into what Logic had put on each track. There were two kick tracks one inside one outside. The inside was kind of hollow sounding but fat on the lower bands. The outside was kind of warm and wooly.

Guess what Logic chose to do to the inside track?
Yes there it was, a huge cut into 500hz

The other thing that was interesting is Logic was using a transient shaping plug on the kit. Putting sharp transients in post compressor tracks to get back the attack the compressor took away.

Well I took what I thought was relevant from dissecting the plugs on the tracks, but that doesn’t mean I am going to scoop 500Hz out of the inside kick track every time I mix a drum set. But I will probably be tempted to try it...

Pat
Old 4 weeks ago
  #220
Gear Nut
 

Use UAD plugs?

Sounds good to me..
Old 4 weeks ago
  #221
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by oranzil View Post
Sounds good to me..
Yeah I got another tip in that vein. Use a U47 into a Neve console into a Studer tape machine. For vocals maybe a CL1B or an EAR 660.

My point is I'm not sure gear recommendations count as 'tips' unless it's something really cheap or unusual.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuieve View Post
I opened two threads at the same time (GS user mixes and this) and I thought I was in the user mixes section and was about to say something about this one.

Well, I won't now.

But the music industry definitely progressed.

In 1979 this would've been a single too:

LMFAO!!!! Absolutely hilarious! Celine Dion would be crying tears of joy to hear someone do a rendition so superior to her own.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #223
***This has been redacted***

Last edited by hello people; 3 weeks ago at 05:59 AM..
Old 4 weeks ago
  #224
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proxy's Avatar
 

Watching CLA mix with the masters a while back, I enjoyed how he gave everything a subtle bump in volume from section to section. I don’t do it the same way as he did, but it unlocked a much more dynamic approach to my mixing overall.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #225
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Zyzygis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 9xSound View Post
LMFAO!!!! Absolutely hilarious! Celine Dion would be crying tears of joy to hear someone do a rendition so superior to her own.
At last! A version of this wretched song that I find tolerable.
Thanks.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #226
Gear Addict
 
Overdrive's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSchlomo View Post
Every word from Shelly is pure knowledge...So much to learn from him.
Shut up and listen is a rule I was taught the first week on the job. The pro who mentored me had already retired from mixing years ago but that rule stays true to this day.

Shut Up And Listen
Old 4 weeks ago
  #227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Overdrive View Post
Shut up and listen is a rule I was taught the first week on the job. The pro who mentored me had already retired from mixing years ago but that rule stays true to this day.

Shut Up And Listen
Exactly. Learned day one. Also learned day one was IF asked by a client/artist “how does it sound?” ALWAYS agree with the engineer/producer...and don’t walk out of the control room when a vocalist is mid take (if they can see you)
Old 4 weeks ago
  #228
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Funny Cat's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Overdrive View Post
Shut up and listen is a rule I was taught the first week on the job. The pro who mentored me had already retired from mixing years ago but that rule stays true to this day.

Shut Up And Listen

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie Mumbles View Post
Exactly. Learned day one. Also learned day one was IF asked by a client/artist “how does it sound?” ALWAYS agree with the engineer/producer...and don’t be walk out of the control room when a vocalist is mid take (if they can see you)


Agreed. This lesson was real easy to learn back when you got "excused" to go clean the toilets for talking out of turn.

Now everyone thinks they have a valid opinion...even interns fresh out of audio college.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #229
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GreenNeedle's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie Mumbles View Post
don’t walk out of the control room when a vocalist is mid take (if they can see you)
Yes, in fact when someone is tracking their parts, it is the engineers responsibility to make sure the control room is quiet and people are focusing on the part being tracked and giving attention and energy to the player.
The musician performing can feel it, and it helps immensely and can come across in a very negative way if people are yacking about all kinds of unrelated ****, laughing and carrying on.
Even if its all in good fun the player will feel less valued and it will hinder their performance and seriousness of the work they are doing.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #230
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenNeedle View Post
Yes, in fact when someone is tracking their parts, it is the engineers responsibility to make sure the control room is quiet and people are focusing on the part being tracked and giving attention and energy to the player.
The musician performing can feel it, and it helps immensely and can come across in a very negative way if people are yacking about all kinds of unrelated ****, laughing and carrying on.
Even if its all in good fun the player will feel less valued and it will hinder their performance and seriousness of the work they are doing.
Agreed. Also, if a singer is mid take, and sees people walking out, one it’s a distraction, and two he could be self conscience about the particular take and think the person is leaving cause they don’t “feel it”. I also have seen it work the other way....I’ve worked with rappers that didn’t rehearse their verse in the control room in Front of their friends (just after writing it), they waited till they were in the booth, and when they did start to rap, their friends, having not heard it, got all excited when they did finally hear the verse. It was very cool to see. When someone rehearses a part for a while in the control room, their friends will naturally get used to it, and when it’s time to record they (the friends) may not be as excited (and may even try to act as producer themselves) but when the friends HAVENT heard the verse, and the rapper raps it, it’s fresh to all and people seem to respond well to the new verse. The friends get all excited and that makes the rapper feel good too. I’ve seen a few famous rappers do this to great effect. (And a famous singer once, tho it was just him and me, it blew me away)
Old 4 weeks ago
  #231
Some great points up above.

One thing I have learned over the years is to mix by feel over sound. I will always print a rough that feels really great but isn’t there detail wise - I will then keep referencing this as I do the real mix and make sure I’m not losing any of the energy and feeling as I dial in the technical bits. If something sounds better but feels worse, I go back to the drawing board until it sounds better and feels better. If I can’t quite match the vibe while achieving what I am trying to do sonically, I go back to something closer to the rough that feels best.

Also don’t work on parts in isolation more than you need to - Try to make adjustments in the context of the full mix as much as possible, as this allows you to feel how a given change is affecting the whole song delivery

This is how a listener responds to music - I guarantee they don’t care how your snare drum sounds in isolation - They respond to how it feels in the mix.

The feeling always trumps technique, but the being said, it’s the technique that allows you to amplify the feeling - so it’s a feedback loop once you know what you’re doing.


Last edited by Hardtoe; 4 weeks ago at 07:16 PM..
Old 4 weeks ago
  #232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hardtoe View Post
Some great points up above.

One thing I have learned over the years is to mix by feel over sound. I will always print a rough that feels really great but isn’t there detail wise - I will then keep referencing this as I do the real max and make sure I’m not losing any of the energy and feeling as I dial in the technical bits. If something sounds better but feels worse I go back to the drawing board until it sounds better and feels better. If I can’t quite match the Vibe while achieving what I am trying to do sonically, I go back to something closer to the rough that feels best.

Also don’t work on parts in isolation more than you need to - Try to make adjustments in the context of the full mix as much as possible, as this allows you to feel How a given change is affecting the whole song delivery

This is how a listener responds to music - I guarantee they don’t care how your snare drum sounds in isolation - They respond to how it feels in the mix.

The feeling always trumps technique, but it’s the technique that allows you to amplify the feeling,so it’s a feedback loop once you know what you’re doing.

I have been doing this more too. I got out of “the box” largely and because of this I wind up with decent ruff mixes in pro tools (largely panning, balance, minor EQ and comp just so it sounds decent to continue production) so come mixtime I am basically starting over and spreading it out on the console. So I will reference the ruff mix print to make sure I didn’t loose the vibe I had when I finished the recording. These are things we didn’t have to deal with in the days before total recall lol. We would just do a ruff mix each time we work up until the mix. Seemed simplier to me back then. Lol
Old 4 weeks ago
  #233
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by andychamp View Post
I have a corner of my screen set as screen mute when I park the mouse there.
Invaluable for when the artists come in to listen to a mix. Some of them rediscover their ears this way.
I've been doing this for years and it is a total game changer on a mix and for artist playback. I also do it often when tracking. Anything to help listen with my ears and not my eyes!

The biggest technique I've learned from a pro is to automate the vocal fader before compressing any further. Instant mix level-up!

The one technique I've been using lately (I mostly mix single song projects, not albums) is to start my mix with broad, intuitive moves, bounce a mix early, and reference it on a few trusted sources before getting down to a "real" mix session. It helps me pinpoint trouble areas and also keeps me from spending a lot of time on something that might not need any adjustment.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #234
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmedek View Post
I've been doing this for years and it is a total game changer on a mix and for artist playback. I also do it often when tracking. Anything to help listen with my ears and not my eyes!

The biggest technique I've learned from a pro is to automate the vocal fader before compressing any further. Instant mix level-up!

The one technique I've been using lately (I mostly mix single song projects, not albums) is to start my mix with broad, intuitive moves, bounce a mix early, and reference it on a few trusted sources before getting down to a "real" mix session. It helps me pinpoint trouble areas and also keeps me from spending a lot of time on something that might not need any adjustment.
I have two computer monitors, one between the studio monitors above the console, and the other off to the right. I keep the one above the console off most all the time unless absolutely needed. It’s largely needed on in the mix, but not the whole mix, and tracking I hardly ever put it on. And def not on playbacks of any kind. Too much of a distraction even down to the luminescence it puts off.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #235
Lives for gear
I have 4 different studio monitors that I switch between while mixing...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #236
Gear Head
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
These aren't mixing tips; they're quick-recall tips. And they're only useful if you have a ton of money to spend on redundant gear and you're willing to compromise on the sound (a bit) to make the recalls consistent.
Also useful with a DAW, a mix template and a $29 Waves plug-in.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #237
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noisewagon View Post
I have 4 different studio monitors that I switch between while mixing...
I used to be like that. It turns out I was using crappy speakers.

Since I got my Focals I know I can rely on one main reference, and mixes are translating. The mix cubes, computer speakers, and big stereo speakers still get checked as a reality check sometimes, but 98% of the mix happens on one set of really good monitors.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #238
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Zyzygis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
I used to be like that. It turns out I was using crappy speakers.

Since I got my Focals I know I can rely on one main reference, and mixes are translating. The mix cubes, computer speakers, and big stereo speakers still get checked as a reality check sometimes, but 98% of the mix happens on one set of really good monitors.
Which Focals do you have and do you think they are good for any kind of music?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #239
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zyzygis View Post
Which Focals do you have and do you think they are good for any kind of music?
Yeah absolutely, I listen to black metal, jazz, rock, folk, electronic, funk, classical, everything is wonderful. I mix and produce a variety of styles as well.

I use the Aria 906. They are passive speakers.

They have the magnesium tweeters and the flax cone woofers, similar to the Shape series monitors, but since they are passive I saved a bit of money since I already have a nice power amp.

They took a small bit of getting used to, but any speaker is going to. The "mellow-ish" tweeters might not be to some peoples taste, but I have a really hard time with super bright tweeters. Now I am in love with them and I would say they are my #1 most important studio gear purchase of all time. If I could go way back in time, maybe I would have bought some high end monitors before buying that high end vocal microphone, in the queue of purchases.

These things are happening to me, better mixes, better masters, faster workflow, less listening fatigue. People are giving me very positive feedback on my work since these were here. I'm sure they are not the only reason but at least a part of why.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #240
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Zyzygis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
Yeah absolutely, I listen to black metal, jazz, rock, folk, electronic, funk, classical, everything is wonderful. I mix and produce a variety of styles as well.

I use the Aria 906. They are passive speakers.

They have the magnesium tweeters and the flax cone woofers, similar to the Shape series monitors, but since they are passive I saved a bit of money since I already have a nice power amp.

They took a small bit of getting used to, but any speaker is going to. The "mellow-ish" tweeters might not be to some peoples taste, but I have a really hard time with super bright tweeters. Now I am in love with them and I would say they are my #1 most important studio gear purchase of all time. If I could go way back in time, maybe I would have bought some high end monitors before buying that high end vocal microphone, in the queue of purchases.

These things are happening to me, better mixes, better masters, faster workflow, less listening fatigue. People are giving me very positive feedback on my work since these were here. I'm sure they are not the only reason but at least a part of why.
Thanks!
Sounds like you found a great match for your needs.
I am looking for a new set of active nearfield monitors and the Focals keep coming up. I am also interested in the IK MTM monitors which haven’t been released yet but they have onboard room correction which could be interesting.
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