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Most useful mixing trick you learned from pros
Old 3 weeks ago
  #691
Lives for gear
 
tymish's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
He works in a town and a genre where sameness counts for a lot.

I know a lot of highly competent singers and players and writers who want to break into that inner circle more than anything. And I don't even live there. I find it weird.
Makes me wonder how much of it is his mixes or what he's mixing. Some people say the same thing about CLA. There's a certain style and signature, recent mixes of Blues Traveler vs say Badflower show how much is about the content and how it was recorded in the first place.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #692
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Funny Cat View Post
I did a project like this last year. The artist hired someone from one of the famous philharmonic orchestras in Brazil (where it was tracked). When I got the files it had close mic, XY close Room and if memory serves me, M/S far rooms. They sent me about 30 tracks all together? It sounded absolutely fantastic. I was totally fooled by the initial ruff into thinking it was at least a 3-5 piece until I got the files into the computer. It certainly helps that it was tracked at a studio in Brazil that primarily does film scores.
amazing what people do for money...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #693
Lives for snowflakes
 
12ax7's Avatar
 

Twist the knobs 'till it sounds good.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #694
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Brent's name is now Brad.

I bet if you had one string player you could use two mics. one close and one ambient. Then you could pan your "section" with mono blended ambience or something like a bunch of toms and that, in my head, sounds like it would be fun/cool.

Or you can move the chair around the room. Maybe she does that. It's been a long time since I got the tip.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #695
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
Or you can move the chair around the room. Maybe she does that. It's been a long time since I got the tip.
If you don't move either the chair or the mic between passes, the beating harmonics from the rosin will... well... you'll find out.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #696
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Great avatar tymish!
Chris
Old 3 weeks ago
  #697
Gear Addict
 

Wow! 45 minutes for a mix? That means that he listens to the song 10 times!!!

3 or 4 hours is fast mixing. 45 minutes is just crazy! It takes me time to figure out what makes the song tic, and come up with a plan. Then learning the parts and doing the rides. I don't know how one could do it in 45 minutes. It takes me that long to get organized and get everything set up where I want it in the mixer. Lots' of times the tracks have to be relabeled because they are called CRAZYSongBassDI, and I just want to see Bass! Different strokes...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #698
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Extreme Mixing View Post
Wow! 45 minutes for a mix? That means that he listens to the song 10 times!!!

3 or 4 hours is fast mixing. 45 minutes is just crazy! It takes me time to figure out what makes the song tic, and come up with a plan. Then learning the parts and doing the rides. I don't know how one could do it in 45 minutes. It takes me that long to get organized and get everything set up where I want it in the mixer. Lots' of times the tracks have to be relabeled because they are called CRAZYSongBassDI, and I just want to see Bass! Different strokes...
well, if you either get an assistant to do all the nitty gritty and make tracks fit into a template or you recorded (and labelled) things on your own so you know what to expect, maybe printed some dynamics on the way in, the song and arrangement don't call for sophisticated tweaks etc. imo it's not that much of a surprise...

...and not much different from how (some) things were done a couple of years back or mixing live at a festival (in the analog days) when you had a house desk, a festival patch, no more than 30min for switch over between bands but then blast out to tenthousands of folks!

Last edited by deedeeyeah; 3 weeks ago at 10:36 PM.. Reason: typo
Old 3 weeks ago
  #699
I take just as long to mix a track these days as I did with 2" and a non-automated console back in the 80's. But it costs the clients less now.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #700
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bkbirge View Post
I take just as long to mix a track these days as I did with 2" and a non-automated console...
Subtract the rewind time, and now you take longer.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #701
Gear Guru
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessparov2.0 View Post
Great avatar tymish!
Chris
Hey Monkey don't PM me any more, my wife is getting suspicious (you're on Gear What?.... who the hell is that?!).......

Need at least 3x's with the new avatar......
Old 3 weeks ago
  #702
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Extreme Mixing View Post
Wow! 45 minutes for a mix? That means that he listens to the song 10 times!!!

3 or 4 hours is fast mixing. 45 minutes is just crazy! It takes me time to figure out what makes the song tic, and come up with a plan. Then learning the parts and doing the rides. I don't know how one could do it in 45 minutes. It takes me that long to get organized and get everything set up where I want it in the mixer. Lots' of times the tracks have to be relabeled because they are called CRAZYSongBassDI, and I just want to see Bass! Different strokes...
Think of CLA as the mixing version of Zakk Wylde, if you get the picture.

Music for some people is the same thing as driving a loud muscle car.

In fact CLA has been quoted as saying that literally about his mix process. I want to say the quote that comes to mind about a process interview. "I'll give YOU the keys to the Lhamborgini."

He's got a great "pit crew" as well.

It's kind of impressive, if I've got to be honest.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #703
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Subtract the rewind time, and now you take longer.
CLA switched to Focusrite RED Net interfaces a while back. Still hardcore about exactly 48 tracks though. Last I heard.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Extreme Mixing View Post
Wow! 45 minutes for a mix? That means that he listens to the song 10 times!!!

3 or 4 hours is fast mixing. 45 minutes is just crazy! It takes me time to figure out what makes the song tic, and come up with a plan. Then learning the parts and doing the rides. I don't know how one could do it in 45 minutes. It takes me that long to get organized and get everything set up where I want it in the mixer. Lots' of times the tracks have to be relabeled because they are called CRAZYSongBassDI, and I just want to see Bass! Different strokes...
As Brent said, the kind of song he works with doesn't need a lot of figuring out. He doesn't have to label anything, the tracks in his template are already labeled the way he wants. He just drags the audio into the tracks in his template, adjusts the gain to his structure (which is superloud) and the mix is almost done. Really. Close mic drum tracks are entirely replaced 99% of the time, guitar and bass EQ/comp are in place and barely touched (70Hz HPF and cutting mids on bass, cranking highend on electric guitars), vocal treatment on the tracks is set up, routing and FX (quite simple verb and delay setup) are there.
So far 8 minutes mixing time are over. Then he listens carefully, pays attention to his drum triggers, does some automation and well, barely 45 minutes. Done.

If those modern Nashville country pop rock tunes weren't designed to sound the same in the first place, this wouldn't work at all. The result reflects the production: technically pristine and sounding great on every radio station, but plain boring.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #705
Most useful trick has been putting groups of tracks into busses, and adding slight compression and EQ on those busses. I now have a template with a drum+bass bus, guitar bus, vocal bus, synth bus and misc bus. It has helped me a lot in terms of mixing efficiently and I tend to focus more on the song instead of on all the individual elements (of course I still process individual tracks, but the focus is on the busses).
Old 3 weeks ago
  #706
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Related that, a Jacquire King mix tip

Send your kick and bass to a parallel bus, same bus, and compress lightly with a Fairchild (he used the UAD plugin)

I haven't tried it yet but sounds smart

More Jacquire King. Get crazy sound FX sends, trails, etc, happening all throughout the session and leading up to the mix, print them to a track. Find a place to mix them in when you finally sit down and pull all the faders up. Add extra keyboards to the song if you need to.

That Warren Huart video is pure gold, I don't know if they took it down (keeps happening to all the good ones) or not. You can pay for the Graham Cochrane video if you're that curious about Jacquire's techniques. Warren's video should be free, and shorter.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #707
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
Related that, a Jacquire King mix tip

Send your kick and bass to a parallel bus, same bus, and compress lightly with a Fairchild (he used the UAD plugin)
Do this pretty much on every mix (not always Fairchild, sometimes a VCA or fet comp). It's the easiest way of making sure the bass and kick both sit nicely in the mix for me.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #708
Quote:
Originally Posted by graphicnomad View Post
Do this pretty much on every mix (not always Fairchild, sometimes a VCA or fet comp). It's the easiest way of making sure the bass and kick both sit nicely in the mix for me.
Give an opto a shot in that role next time you're checkin comps. Love the Acme Opticom for these kind of applications.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #709
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSchlomo View Post
Give an opto a shot in that role next time you're checkin comps. Love the Acme Opticom for these kind of applications.
Huh, that's interesting. I would think an opto comp would be too slow to catch the kick signal? I'll give it a try for sure!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #710
Quote:
Originally Posted by graphicnomad View Post
Huh, that's interesting. I would think an opto comp would be too slow to catch the kick signal? I'll give it a try for sure!
That's why I said it, many people wouldn't consider it. As it's parallel, it does a nice job of fattening both up and locking them in place. The Acme has a fast setting, but I tend to keep it on normal. The fast setting also distorts more, can be a cool thing.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #711
Gear Addict
Mix with very low volume!

Really helps working on a mix... "everything" sounds great @ 100db
Old 3 weeks ago
  #712
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
More Jacquire King. Get crazy sound FX sends, trails, etc, happening all throughout the session and leading up to the mix, print them to a track. Find a place to mix them in when you finally sit down and pull all the faders up. Add extra keyboards to the song if you need to.
I often, when I'm close to finishing a mix, print the LV to a new track (processing but no sends) then use it to trigger stuff - often a spin delay, but sometimes a filter echo or stutter edit or something.

Much easier than automating sends for spins!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #713
Gear Head
 

What I like to do (with great! Results is)

1. Set the master output to mono.
2. Turn all the faders down so you don’t hear anything.
3. Slowly bring a fader up of one of your important sounds (or vocal) so you can barely hear it.
4. Bring the other faders up slowly and make sure you still hear all the tracks, so that you can barely hear them (because of the low volume).
5. Bounce to audio
6. Now pull the master-channel fader down to such a point where you are having a hard time hearing all the trakcs, but you still must be able to hear every instrument, check if you hear everything by muting and soloing tracks.
7. Now start eq-ing every track to such a point that you can hear the tracks clearly. Put a high pass filter where needed, and a low pass filter where needed. Make the boosts that are needed, (mostly the frequency’s played, for instance: playing a A4? Boost 440hz)
8. Bounce to audio in stereo, set back to mono after bouncing.
9. Apply compression if you think it is needed on some instruments.
10. Bounce to audio in stereo, set back to mono after bouncing.
11. Now re-balance, again turn all the faders down completely and repeat #2 (second step)
12. Bounce to audio in stereo, set back to mono after boucing.
13. Decide (imagine) which track should be soft panned and which tracks should be hard panned, do this in mono
14 Panning - the lower the instrument/vocal in frequency range, the more to center. The hiner the frequency, the more off the center. Double some high frequency tracks, pan 1 to the left and 1 to the right competely, let the eq settings differ.
15. Listen if a rebalance is needed after panning.
16. Set Master Output to stereo and listen.
17. Bounce to audio in Stereo And Mono.
18. Compare all the bounces, which bounce sounds the best?
19. Play from laptop speaker, tablet speakers, television soeakers, any other speaker you might have, does it sound clear on all speakers? Make notes when listening back to your mix.

Now you have your balanced mix, as a finishing touch you can apply some effects on the master if you like or send some tracks to a bus via a send. To play with effects if you like.

Reason for lowering the volume of all tracks so you can barely hear the composition is to make sure you apply the right eq settings.

Also important, which instrument(s) are played in the same octave? Which instruments have overlapping notes/frequencies? Check if they mask each other and find out which frequency area is the problem.
If so, the frequency that is boosted in 1 instrument should be cut the other instrument(s).

A compressor on the master bus can make you track stand out.

Last but not least, not only reference to other tracks, reference to your own bounces. You should constantly reference to your own bounces. The plan has to be that your mix sounds better and better every time you work on mixing. If you are not referencing your own track you can never hear what you have actually done.

Good luck.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #714
Lives for gear
 
Funny Cat's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radiussound View Post
What I like to do (with great! Results is)

1. Set the master output to mono.
2. Turn all the faders down so you don’t hear anything.
3. Slowly bring a fader up of one of your important sounds (or vocal) so you can barely hear it.
4. Bring the other faders up slowly and make sure you still hear all the tracks, so that you can barely hear them (because of the low volume).
5. Bounce to audio
6. Now pull the master-channel fader down to such a point where you are having a hard time hearing all the trakcs, but you still must be able to hear every instrument, check if you hear everything by muting and soloing tracks.
7. Now start eq-ing every track to such a point that you can hear the tracks clearly. Put a high pass filter where needed, and a low pass filter where needed. Make the boosts that are needed, (mostly the frequency’s played, for instance: playing a A4? Boost 440hz)
8. Bounce to audio in stereo, set back to mono after bouncing.
9. Apply compression if you think it is needed on some instruments.
10. Bounce to audio in stereo, set back to mono after bouncing.
11. Now re-balance, again turn all the faders down completely and repeat #2 (second step)
12. Bounce to audio in stereo, set back to mono after boucing.
13. Decide (imagine) which track should be soft panned and which tracks should be hard panned, do this in mono
14 Panning - the lower the instrument/vocal in frequency range, the more to center. The hiner the frequency, the more off the center. Double some high frequency tracks, pan 1 to the left and 1 to the right competely, let the eq settings differ.
15. Listen if a rebalance is needed after panning.
16. Set Master Output to stereo and listen.
17. Bounce to audio in Stereo And Mono.
18. Compare all the bounces, which bounce sounds the best?
19. Play from laptop speaker, tablet speakers, television soeakers, any other speaker you might have, does it sound clear on all speakers? Make notes when listening back to your mix.

Now you have your balanced mix, as a finishing touch you can apply some effects on the master if you like or send some tracks to a bus via a send. To play with effects if you like.

Reason for lowering the volume of all tracks so you can barely hear the composition is to make sure you apply the right eq settings.

Also important, which instrument(s) are played in the same octave? Which instruments have overlapping notes/frequencies? Check if they mask each other and find out which frequency area is the problem.
If so, the frequency that is boosted in 1 instrument should be cut the other instrument(s).

A compressor on the master bus can make you track stand out.

Last but not least, not only reference to other tracks, reference to your own bounces. You should constantly reference to your own bounces. The plan has to be that your mix sounds better and better every time you work on mixing. If you are not referencing your own track you can never hear what you have actually done.

Good luck.

How long does this method take you to complete a mix?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #715
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Funny Cat View Post
How long does this method take you to complete a mix?
By my estimation, a week and a half.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #716
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Just reading all that stuff wore me out. Can't imagine doing it.

Actually, I lied. Didn't really read it.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #717
A great trick I've found to making most tracks sound better is to mute the vocals.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #718
Lives for snowflakes
 
12ax7's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Can't imagine doing it.
Actually, I lied.
Didn't really read it.
In that case, maybe you actually DID do it (since you didn't read the post, and therefore would never know otherwise).
Old 3 weeks ago
  #719
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
I pulled the plug when "what I like to do" came across the lines. Unless we got a pro with 27 posts.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #720
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Funny Cat View Post
How long does this method take you to complete a mix?
It goes very quick, it is happening in the creation and after creation of the song. I have not measured it in time but within 1 hour it can be done easily.
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