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Most useful mixing trick you learned from pros
Old 15th September 2019
  #661
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 007 View Post
Personally, I'd love to see more examples of mixing templates/routing from the ITB crowd.
Did a YouTube search and found a few decent videos but most of them barely scratched the surface, stating the obvious busses for all drums, reverbs and delays, etc.

I started creating a template in my DAW, using mostly Aux channels with respective bus numbers as their input. Just wondering how you all are configuring yours.

Do you prefer putting effects in the first few slots, then instrument groups, or the other way around? Are you making groups for just kicks, just snares, then routing those to an 'ALL DRUMS' bus, or preferring only the latter as a subgroup and simply processing all your kicks individually with inserts.

Are you creating a parallel comp aux for most of your instrument groups or is that mostly for drums - ie: do you have a PC channel for the vox group, the guitars group, bass, synths, etc?

For example, to me something like this sounds about right, perhaps may even seem like overkill to some, although templates do change and evolve over time. This is only a groups an effects configuration, taking into consideration the individual track routed to these would also have had some processing done to them, if only with a gain/trim plug, some light eq and compression.


AUX 1: VOX
AUX 2: BGV
AUX 3: VOX PRL (via send/bus 1)
AUX 4: DRUMS 1
AUX 5: DRUMS 2
AUX 6: PERCUSSION
AUX 7: DRUM PRL (via send/bus 2)
AUX 8: BASS 1
AUX 9: BASS 2
AUX 10:BASS SYNTH
AUX 11:BASS PRL (via send/bus 3)
AUX 12:KEYS 1
AUX 13:KEYS 2
AUX 14:KEYS PRL (via send/bus 4)
AUX 15:GTRS 1
AUX 16:GTRS 2
AUX 17:GTR PRL (via send/bus 5)
AUX 18:TEXTURES
AUX 19:FX
AUX 20:TEXT/FX PRL (via send/bus 6)

AUX 21: SUBMIX

AUX 22: REV PLATE (via send/return bus 7 and onwards)
AUX 23: REV HALL
AUX 24: REV SHORT
AUX 25: DLY 1/8
AUX 26: DLY 1/4
AUX 27: DLY BLACK HOLE
AUX 28: SATURATION 1
AUX 29: SATURATION 2
AUX 30: DISTORTION 1
AUX 31: DISTORTION 2
AUX 32: SOUNDTOYS EFX RACK (adjust to taste)


Just one example of how it 'could be done', just really curious to see other people's workflow, how and why you would reposition tracks, what are you favorite plugins to use on those send/return aux tracks and why, and if you parallel compress so many groups or not, etc.

Thanks for any input and comments!
my digital desks lets me configure even more auxes... - however, i'm almost NEVER using dedicated auxes for specific instruments but use four auxes with different room settings, from small to large, which cover almost all my needs. maybe four more auxes for delay, pitch shifter, chorus and an additional toy but beyond that? i dunno...
Old 16th September 2019
  #662
Quote:
Originally Posted by 007 View Post
Personally, I'd love to see more examples of mixing templates/routing from the ITB crowd.
Did a YouTube search and found a few decent videos but most of them barely scratched the surface, stating the obvious busses for all drums, reverbs and delays, etc.

I started creating a template in my DAW, using mostly Aux channels with respective bus numbers as their input. Just wondering how you all are configuring yours.

Do you prefer putting effects in the first few slots, then instrument groups, or the other way around? Are you making groups for just kicks, just snares, then routing those to an 'ALL DRUMS' bus, or preferring only the latter as a subgroup and simply processing all your kicks individually with inserts.

Are you creating a parallel comp aux for most of your instrument groups or is that mostly for drums - ie: do you have a PC channel for the vox group, the guitars group, bass, synths, etc?

For example, to me something like this sounds about right, perhaps may even seem like overkill to some, although templates do change and evolve over time. This is only a groups an effects configuration, taking into consideration the individual track routed to these would also have had some processing done to them, if only with a gain/trim plug, some light eq and compression.


AUX 1: VOX
AUX 2: BGV
AUX 3: VOX PRL (via send/bus 1)
AUX 4: DRUMS 1
AUX 5: DRUMS 2
AUX 6: PERCUSSION
AUX 7: DRUM PRL (via send/bus 2)
AUX 8: BASS 1
AUX 9: BASS 2
AUX 10:BASS SYNTH
AUX 11:BASS PRL (via send/bus 3)
AUX 12:KEYS 1
AUX 13:KEYS 2
AUX 14:KEYS PRL (via send/bus 4)
AUX 15:GTRS 1
AUX 16:GTRS 2
AUX 17:GTR PRL (via send/bus 5)
AUX 18:TEXTURES
AUX 19:FX
AUX 20:TEXT/FX PRL (via send/bus 6)

AUX 21: SUBMIX

AUX 22: REV PLATE (via send/return bus 7 and onwards)
AUX 23: REV HALL
AUX 24: REV SHORT
AUX 25: DLY 1/8
AUX 26: DLY 1/4
AUX 27: DLY BLACK HOLE
AUX 28: SATURATION 1
AUX 29: SATURATION 2
AUX 30: DISTORTION 1
AUX 31: DISTORTION 2
AUX 32: SOUNDTOYS EFX RACK (adjust to taste)


Just one example of how it 'could be done', just really curious to see other people's workflow, how and why you would reposition tracks, what are you favorite plugins to use on those send/return aux tracks and why, and if you parallel compress so many groups or not, etc.

Thanks for any input and comments!
I’m not sure why you’d need this many auxes for regular processing. Just put the processing on the channel in the case of vocals!

Personally I have a template for fx - a selection of verbs for drums, and a few parallel busses for dry, compressed, crunch and sub. Bass channels run through an aux with a send to a sub as well.

Sometimes I’ll subgroup other things if multimiked or a group eg strings or BVs. But otherwise I’ve then got s selection of sends - a few vocal verbs and then vocal delays, a general room and spring, a few sfx and special flavour verbs, and generic tempo sync’d delays. And the mix buss aux of course. But no vocal parallels or any other auxes - there’s just no need for me!
Old 17th September 2019
  #663
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattias78 View Post
I really liked cla's drum reverb setup.
I think he has like 4 reverbs with pretty short time. The bricasti and Sony reverb is both like under 1 second. Then his emt and the last which I can't remember is also like around a second. Together the Drums become roomy but still tight enough.
I learned a trick from @ jcoutu1

1.5 ish second plate reverb on snare drum, mixed in just so you can hear it. I, we? use the PSP 2445.

It doesn't really sound like reverb in the sense of phil collins or something. it just makes the drum sound "bigger" and more present with size in the drum mix.

One of those ones where you don't necessarily want to "hear the reverb."

I like Funnycat's plate reverb on snare too mixed a lot higher, the Valhalla Plate I thought that was so smooth.
Old 18th September 2019
  #664
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
I learned a trick from @ jcoutu1

1.5 ish second plate reverb on snare drum, mixed in just so you can hear it. I, we? use the PSP 2445.

It doesn't really sound like reverb in the sense of phil collins or something. it just makes the drum sound "bigger" and more present with size in the drum mix.

One of those ones where you don't necessarily want to "hear the reverb."

I like Funnycat's plate reverb on snare too mixed a lot higher, the Valhalla Plate I thought that was so smooth.
Yeah in some genres you almost have to go for those medium/longer reverbs.
Old 18th September 2019
  #665
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Bob Ross's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
It doesn't really sound like reverb in the sense of phil collins or something. it just makes the drum sound "bigger" and more present with size in the drum mix.
One of those ones where you don't necessarily want to "hear the reverb."
That reminds me of this "trick" I learned from Patrick Leonard:

When mixing pop/funk horns, especially if the part is mostly rhythmic stabs, put a really grainy gated reverb (e.g., factory preset #16 from an old Yamaha SPX-90) on the section and bring it up in mono panned center until it almost sounds like a separate voice. A striking way of making those stabs & hits sound less like "jazz" by making the reed/brass distinction a bit less overt and blending better with rock guitars and/or synths.
Old 18th September 2019
  #666
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Funny Cat's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
That reminds me of this "trick" I learned from Patrick Leonard:

When mixing pop/funk horns, especially if the part is mostly rhythmic stabs, put a really grainy gated reverb (e.g., factory preset #16 from an old Yamaha SPX-90) on the section and bring it up in mono panned center until it almost sounds like a separate voice. A striking way of making those stabs & hits sound less like "jazz" by making the reed/brass distinction a bit less overt and blending better with rock guitars and/or synths.

Nice! Def gonna try that one! I've been doing something similar with mono delays but never tried it with a reverb. Thanks.
Old 18th September 2019
  #667
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Nigel Godrich trick. Take a chamber/plate/reverb whatever he uses. Guitar part panned hard right. Equal volume Reverb panned left. You can also double it with a second guitar/keyboard on the left side with reverb panned hard right. Sounds swirly and insane. Good example is song "Subterranean Homesick Alien," still gives me chills. The stereo LFO pan Fender Rhodes amp thing is also insane when double mic'd and panned hard L/R.

Another great trick is a stereo phaser on the main stereo instrument, make sure the left and right are phasing inversely from one another, sounds like a spinning 3D wheel sound. Sucks your ears out a bit. Somewhere on the Eraser album by Thom Yorke this can be clearly heard.

If you want to hear an insane stereo effect listen to Aphex Twin "Gwely Mernans." He's using some kind of mid side stereo widener thing to put the sound actually all the way to the left wall of your room, to the back wall, then to the right wall and back around the front.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
That reminds me of this "trick" I learned from Patrick Leonard:

When mixing pop/funk horns, especially if the part is mostly rhythmic stabs, put a really grainy gated reverb (e.g., factory preset #16 from an old Yamaha SPX-90) on the section and bring it up in mono panned center until it almost sounds like a separate voice. A striking way of making those stabs & hits sound less like "jazz" by making the reed/brass distinction a bit less overt and blending better with rock guitars and/or synths.
Will try when a ska-band walks in on me. So hard to find cool things to do with horns without sounding weird.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #669
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
Nigel Godrich trick. Take a chamber/plate/reverb whatever he uses. Guitar part panned hard right. Equal volume Reverb panned left. You can also double it with a second guitar/keyboard on the left side with reverb panned hard right. Sounds swirly and insane. Good example is song "Subterranean Homesick Alien," still gives me chills. The stereo LFO pan Fender Rhodes amp thing is also insane when double mic'd and panned hard L/R.

Another great trick is a stereo phaser on the main stereo instrument, make sure the left and right are phasing inversely from one another, sounds like a spinning 3D wheel sound. Sucks your ears out a bit. Somewhere on the Eraser album by Thom Yorke this can be clearly heard.

If you want to hear an insane stereo effect listen to Aphex Twin "Gwely Mernans." He's using some kind of mid side stereo widener thing to put the sound actually all the way to the left wall of your room, to the back wall, then to the right wall and back around the front.
Have a good amount of respect for Nigel but he is so hard to interviews with.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #670
Quote:
Originally Posted by 007 View Post
Personally, I'd love to see more examples of mixing templates/routing from the ITB crowd.
Did a YouTube search and found a few decent videos but most of them barely scratched the surface, stating the obvious busses for all drums, reverbs and delays, etc.

I started creating a template in my DAW, using mostly Aux channels with respective bus numbers as their input. Just wondering how you all are configuring yours.

Do you prefer putting effects in the first few slots, then instrument groups, or the other way around? Are you making groups for just kicks, just snares, then routing those to an 'ALL DRUMS' bus, or preferring only the latter as a subgroup and simply processing all your kicks individually with inserts.

Are you creating a parallel comp aux for most of your instrument groups or is that mostly for drums - ie: do you have a PC channel for the vox group, the guitars group, bass, synths, etc?

For example, to me something like this sounds about right, perhaps may even seem like overkill to some, although templates do change and evolve over time. This is only a groups an effects configuration, taking into consideration the individual track routed to these would also have had some processing done to them, if only with a gain/trim plug, some light eq and compression.


AUX 1: VOX
AUX 2: BGV
AUX 3: VOX PRL (via send/bus 1)
AUX 4: DRUMS 1
AUX 5: DRUMS 2
AUX 6: PERCUSSION
AUX 7: DRUM PRL (via send/bus 2)
AUX 8: BASS 1
AUX 9: BASS 2
AUX 10:BASS SYNTH
AUX 11:BASS PRL (via send/bus 3)
AUX 12:KEYS 1
AUX 13:KEYS 2
AUX 14:KEYS PRL (via send/bus 4)
AUX 15:GTRS 1
AUX 16:GTRS 2
AUX 17:GTR PRL (via send/bus 5)
AUX 18:TEXTURES
AUX 19:FX
AUX 20:TEXT/FX PRL (via send/bus 6)

AUX 21: SUBMIX

AUX 22: REV PLATE (via send/return bus 7 and onwards)
AUX 23: REV HALL
AUX 24: REV SHORT
AUX 25: DLY 1/8
AUX 26: DLY 1/4
AUX 27: DLY BLACK HOLE
AUX 28: SATURATION 1
AUX 29: SATURATION 2
AUX 30: DISTORTION 1
AUX 31: DISTORTION 2
AUX 32: SOUNDTOYS EFX RACK (adjust to taste)


Just one example of how it 'could be done', just really curious to see other people's workflow, how and why you would reposition tracks, what are you favorite plugins to use on those send/return aux tracks and why, and if you parallel compress so many groups or not, etc.

Thanks for any input and comments!
As Brauer himself moved hybrid now and does a lot ITB, read up on Brauerizing if you haven't already. It's all about an efficient template framework and there are loads of cool tricks in it. Some of his MWTM videos are still free, I believe. A lot of cool stuff can be learned from Vance Powell, too. He' got a mixing series on PureMix. And also described his template (he's using a console) here:

Mixing a track that you didn't record

However, without seeing what he uses those for, this is semi helpful.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #671
When talking about templates. Check out Billy Decker... His template is not that big but its efficient. Hi usually does a mix in 45 min.
He prepares triggers and just fly's in the audio on the prepared tracks. pretty cool how different you can play this game.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #672
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deleted 5edf3fa View Post
Please post surprising mixing tricks that you learned from someone. Something that is simple, and actually works more often than not.


I have two.

The 1st one is courtesy of CLA, from one of his mixing videos, I find his approach kind of funny with him carelessly twisting all the knobs to the max and moving on to the next channel quickly. I don't think I actually learned anything useful from his videos that I've seen so far, but he's sure entertaining to watch with that eye twitching and leg tapping and some funny comments like "oh, he's not done yet (about another vocal part at the end of the song)".

Anyway... here's tip #1

He said "this is what I always do", twisting 500Hz on the SSL to -15dB (I think Q was set at default 1.5, don't remember and don't have that video anymore) when working on a kick drum.

That's it. Instant magic. All the boom gone. Just a balanced, clean punchy sound.

Normally I'd spend an hour trying to get the same result but working in the wrong (sort of) area, trying to dip 350, then some extra 100-200 etc. etc and end up with too much EQ and still a bad result.

Just dipping the crap out of 500Hz (or so) pretty much gets me to 95% of the desired result. I don't always do -15dB (depending on a kick or drum loop), but -12dB works magic on drums overall in CLA Mixhub at least (other plugins/eq may have different response of course).

Tip #2

(I think it's from Ariel Chobaz video on PLAP channel, but I've heard/saw this done by other engineers so must be a known trick)

Electric guitars - boost 1400Hz. Instant guitarfication.
Mmmmmm. Tip 1 Don't suck out all your low mid.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
That reminds me of this "trick" I learned from Patrick Leonard:

When mixing pop/funk horns, especially if the part is mostly rhythmic stabs, put a really grainy gated reverb (e.g., factory preset #16 from an old Yamaha SPX-90) on the section and bring it up in mono panned center until it almost sounds like a separate voice. A striking way of making those stabs & hits sound less like "jazz" by making the reed/brass distinction a bit less overt and blending better with rock guitars and/or synths.
For the same reason people layer samples/keys with brass. I’d imagine a good polysynth patch could do the same thing.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #674
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
For the same reason people layer samples/keys with brass. I’d imagine a good polysynth patch could do the same thing.
Depends on how much you factor in the intonation. If you don't want the intonation to suck, the notes need to be played one at a time with the left hand on the pitch wheel, same as when you're layering a synth over real strings.

The smart thing that almost nobody ever does, though, is to have the live players track last so they can intonate to the stuff that's already there.

These aren't mixing tips, of course, they're mixing-headache-avoidance tips.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #675
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Depends on how much you factor in the intonation. If you don't want the intonation to suck, the notes need to be played one at a time with the left hand on the pitch wheel, same as when you're layering a synth over real strings.

The smart thing that almost nobody ever does, though, is to have the live players track last so they can intonate to the stuff that's already there.

These aren't mixing tips, of course, they're mixing-headache-avoidance tips.
Nice. Reminds me of a Sylvia Massey trick.

She prefers to track string sections with a single violin player.

They will build up the whole string arrangement part by part all played by the same person.

Then you end up with a lot of options in the mix, and as well the playing is very likely super consistent since it's all from the same player.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #676
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
She prefers to track string sections with a single violin player.

They will build up the whole string arrangement part by part all played by the same person.
I think that may also be "lemonade." A strategy for coping with a geographic issue, and maybe a budget issue as well. I don't know about now, but she used to be in a one-stoplight town where good players and arrangers were in seriously short supply, but time probably wasn't.

Around here you get on the blower, call David Campbell or Sid Page or any of eleventeen other spitting-distance geniuses, and then sit back and hit the red button.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #677
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
I think that may also be "lemonade." A strategy for coping with a geographic issue, and maybe a budget issue as well. I don't know about now, but she used to be in a one-stoplight town where good players and arrangers were in seriously short supply, but time probably wasn't.

Around here you get on the blower, call David Campbell or Sid Page or any of eleventeen other spitting-distance geniuses, and then sit back and hit the red button.
Good insight. I don't remember where she ended up now. She travels a lot also to produce.

Another "Nigel Godrich Trick" because its relevant. I'm going to paraphrase. "Don't be afraid to use more colored microphones and equipment with a specific sound when recording chamber music sections to fit over pop/rock music."

In other words it's not classical music so you don't have to treat it the same.

And don't be afraid to chop it up, rough it up a bit if it works.

I have another quote but I can't remember who said it. "Don't forget to mix your synth parts. A lot of pop/rock producers unfamiliar with pads/keys and stuff forget to mix their synth elements because they don't really know what to do with them."

I'm sure I made that mistake at first.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #678
Lives for gear
 
Bob Ross's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
For the same reason people layer samples/keys with brass. I’d imagine a good polysynth patch could do the same thing.
Probably...biggest difference is that you don't have to program/perform a reverb send.


Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
She prefers to track string sections with a single violin player.
They will build up the whole string arrangement part by part all played by the same person.
Then you end up with a lot of options in the mix, and as well the playing is very likely super consistent since it's all from the same player.
ugh... I'll take the sound of a room full of live string players over a multi-tracked single string player any day of the week...caveat being that we're talking about genuine professional players, not your local high school orchestra.
But Brad's right re: "lemonade" ...if there's only one violinist in a 250 sq. mile radius who can play with tolerable intonation, well, yeah, start multitracking!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #679
Here for the gear
 

Thanks for all the good wisdom in this thread folks. And some love for Taj Mahal - 'Natchl Blues' is one of my favourite albums & Corinna is the jam...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #680
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64gtoboy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
Probably...biggest difference is that you don't have to program/perform a reverb send.




ugh... I'll take the sound of a room full of live string players over a multi-tracked single string player any day of the week...caveat being that we're talking about genuine professional players, not your local high school orchestra.
But Brad's right re: "lemonade" ...if there's only one violinist in a 250 sq. mile radius who can play with tolerable intonation, well, yeah, start multitracking!
Yes but look at the genres she works in. Doing one off stuff is her oeuvre
Old 4 weeks ago
  #681
Lives for gear
 
guavadude's Avatar
The one violin at a time will certainly sound different than an ensemble recording and sometimes that might be just the ticket.

This is a tracking tip more than mixing but ties into this concept. When stacking multiple vocal backing parts and working with a good singer, I don't let them listen to the dead track when they cut each pass. It ends up creating this amazingly tightly tuned stack. It sounds so different from a regular stack, where they can hear the old part, that I consider it an entirely different sound and texture.

The no dead stack sounds less chorused which is opposite of what you'd think. You might have to clean up a few releases here and there but if it's a pro singer more times than not it's dead on. I stumbled upon this by accident, curious if anyone else has used this technique. It's also a lot faster tracking this way and not worrying about the dead track cue feed.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #682
Lives for snowflakes
 
12ax7's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 64gtoboy View Post
Doing one off stuff is her oeuvre
One might completely change the meaning of this sentence (in any of 7 different ways) simply by misspelling any one of the words!
.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #683
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
Nice. Reminds me of a Sylvia Massey trick.

She prefers to track string sections with a single violin player.

They will build up the whole string arrangement part by part all played by the same person.

Then you end up with a lot of options in the mix, and as well the playing is very likely super consistent since it's all from the same player.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
I think that may also be "lemonade." A strategy for coping with a geographic issue, and maybe a budget issue as well. I don't know about now, but she used to be in a one-stoplight town where good players and arrangers were in seriously short supply, but time probably wasn't.

Around here you get on the blower, call David Campbell or Sid Page or any of eleventeen other spitting-distance geniuses, and then sit back and hit the red button.
Yeah that's a budget issue or logistics issue. Consistent playing is also in a way the enemy of a string section - one player on one instrument will sound thinner than 2 different players.

It's also a logistical nightmare. Each part gets up to 5 tracks (close mic, XY or tree, room) and then you get added noise etc.

The only time I'd want to stack one player is if it's layering in to add realism to synth strings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
Probably...biggest difference is that you don't have to program/perform a reverb send.
True!

Quote:
ugh... I'll take the sound of a room full of live string players over a multi-tracked single string player any day of the week...caveat being that we're talking about genuine professional players, not your local high school orchestra.
But Brad's right re: "lemonade" ...if there's only one violinist in a 250 sq. mile radius who can play with tolerable intonation, well, yeah, start multitracking!
Quite!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #684
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
It's also a logistical nightmare. Each part gets up to 5 tracks (close mic, XY or tree, room)...
I don't know anyone who does that, actually. Usually one mic, and move it around a little to avoid "stack hash."
Old 4 weeks ago
  #685
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
I don't know anyone who does that, actually. Usually one mic, and move it around a little to avoid "stack hash."
Yep - I've done it both ways. I don't like doing it either way!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #686
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Yep - I've done it both ways. I don't like doing it either way!
Okay, I know one person. :-)
Old 4 weeks ago
  #687
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Funny Cat's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
I don't know anyone who does that, actually. Usually one mic, and move it around a little to avoid "stack hash."


I did a project like this last year. The artist hired someone from one of the famous philharmonic orchestras in Brazil (where it was tracked). When I got the files it had close mic, XY close Room and if memory serves me, M/S far rooms. They sent me about 30 tracks all together? It sounded absolutely fantastic. I was totally fooled by the initial ruff into thinking it was at least a 3-5 piece until I got the files into the computer. It certainly helps that it was tracked at a studio in Brazil that primarily does film scores.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #688
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Funny Cat View Post
It certainly helps that it was tracked at a studio in Brazil that primarily does film scores.
I'm rarely in a room worth capturing, and just about nobody adding parts to a Dropbox record is. For drums or loud guitars, sure, maybe. But strings? No.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #689
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattias78 View Post
When talking about templates. Check out Billy Decker... His template is not that big but its efficient. Hi usually does a mix in 45 min.
He prepares triggers and just fly's in the audio on the prepared tracks. pretty cool how different you can play this game.
Yeah, but his template only works so well for him because he gets tracks that are played by the same few session players tracked in the same few studios. His approach is rather radical, most of the time completely replacing drums with the same samples. Not saying his mixes don't sound good, sure they do, but they do all sound pretty much the same. This for me is not what a template should be about.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #690
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSchlomo View Post
Not saying his mixes don't sound good, sure they do, but they do all sound pretty much the same. This for me is not what a template should be about.
He works in a town and a genre where sameness counts for a lot.

I know a lot of highly competent singers and players and writers who want to break into that inner circle more than anything. And I don't even live there. I find it weird.
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