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How do the pros track?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

How do the pros track?

One thing I have not figured out yet is how the pros track and record their musicians. I've been searching in regard to my favourite bands (RHCP, Led Zep, Pink Floyd) and cannot seem to find how the engineers set up the tracking chain.

People often talk about the mics they've used and the rooms but what about the way it was recorded in? I find this information hard to come by.

I've heard people say they track with no dynamics or eq and then I see Ryan Hewitt talk about how he comp'd the sh*t out of the lumineers tracking them.

It also seems like something favorable to record and track guitar and bass with compression to prevent any clipping from big dynamics in playing no?

Does anyone know the real way the pros set up tracking for all band instruments?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #2
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Drumsound's Avatar
Pros listen and make decisions as necessary. So they may use compression on bass when recording someone on Tuesday, because they think its what the track needs. On Wednesday, with a different player, and different music, the bass may be recorded without compression.

To use the standard Tape Op Message Board answer "It Depends..."
Old 3 weeks ago
  #3
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
I've heard people say they track with no dynamics or eq and then I see Ryan Hewitt talk about how he comp'd the sh*t out of the lumineers tracking them.
you can look at this in one of two ways: either
A) one of these groups is lying to you about what is the "right way" to do something, or
B) there is no one single "right way" to do something

I would go with "B" myself, because if it's "A" you still have to guess who the liar is.

Quote:
It also seems like something favorable to record and track guitar and bass with compression to prevent any clipping from big dynamics in playing no?
Back when I recorded on tape, and I wanted to get a really high average level to drown out tape hiss, I would track really hot and want a compressor to keep me out of distortion.

But 24 bits is a staggering amount of dynamic range. I can safely record quite conservatively and turn the level up later with no loss of resolution. Then I can use whatever compressor at mixdown and get to change my mind about the sound.

If I use a compressor on the way in, it's because I know that I want that sound, I have confidence in my choice, and I want my hardware compressor to be "involved" in making it (as opposed to using plug-ins). Often it's about the coloration of the compressor as much (or more ) as it is about the actual gain reduction. It's about going for a sound, committing to a sound, using the hardware now so that it is available for something else later. Not so much for keeping the signal out of the red.

Getting the amount of these effects right is not all that simple. It easy to add more when you mix, it's hard to add less when you mix. I ruined quite a few songs by overdoing it when I was first committing my hardware effects in tracking. I recommend to my students that they start off recording flat, play with software versions of these effects and only start committing to the hardware effects after they have learned what things work or don't work for them.

Quote:
Does anyone know the real way the pros set up tracking for all band instruments?
as Drumsound said, 'it depends'. Some engineers may use varying techniques on an as-needed basis. Others may have a 'system' - especially if they specialize in one genre. "The Pros" are no more a monolithic group than the amateurs. There are pluses and minuses to each approach. You should try them out for yourself.

Last edited by joeq; 3 weeks ago at 07:27 PM.. Reason: "if"
Old 3 weeks ago
  #4
Quote:
Does anyone know the real way the pros set up tracking for all band instruments?
I do and here is how you do it:
Each recording session will be set up differently. There is no right or wrong way to do everything. The basic job of the audio engineer is to capture the sounds of the musician, best as possible without doing any harm. So every single recording session will be set up differently. Depending on 1,000,000,000 different variables.

If you are asking this question, hoping to get the 'SECRET' of how the pros do it, there are no SECRETS.
The set up and record a 'professional' manor you need these things:
1. Skills
2. Talent
3. Knowledge
4. Experience
5. Good ears
6. Good intuition
7. Thinking ahead (like chess)

So study the art of audio engineering and you can record and set up like the 'pros'
Old 3 weeks ago
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
One thing I have not figured out yet is how the pros track and record their musicians. I've been searching in regard to my favourite bands (RHCP, Led Zep, Pink Floyd) and cannot seem to find how the engineers set up the tracking chain.

People often talk about the mics they've used and the rooms but what about the way it was recorded in? I find this information hard to come by.

I've heard people say they track with no dynamics or eq and then I see Ryan Hewitt talk about how he comp'd the sh*t out of the lumineers tracking them.

It also seems like something favorable to record and track guitar and bass with compression to prevent any clipping from big dynamics in playing no?

Does anyone know the real way the pros set up tracking for all band instruments?
All of the above.

But really, who cares? If you are a bit uncertain about what to do or maybe, like me, you don't have a control room and everything is done in one room, why commit during recording when you can do it in the DAW afterwords?

I know commit to the sound blahblahblah, saves time blahblahblah, be bold blahblahblahbullsh!t is a great approach when you've been doing it 24/7 for years or you are sitting in a control room and have super ears, but sometimes the go slow and figure it out is the better learning experience then the commit to a fvck up and learn from your mistakes approach.

Soon or later, you get a feel for what works for you, and shouldn't that be your goal?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #6
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thismercifulfate's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
It also seems like something favorable to record and track guitar and bass with compression to prevent any clipping from big dynamics in playing no?
No. This is a silly myth that is constantly put forth by noobies. Like joeq said, 24-bit digital recording allows for very generous headroom to be left. A real pro will not record super hot on a digital system in the first place and certainly will not use a compressor to “prevent clipping”. If they choose to use EQ or compression, it’s because they want to commit to the tone that it imparts.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #7
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who?'s Avatar
 

I disagree. I’ve found that even in high resolution digital systems I can get a bigger sound by hitting a compressor BEFORE the converters. Converters do have sweet spots and headroom just the same as any other electronics.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #8
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Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by who? View Post
I disagree. I’ve found that even in high resolution digital systems I can get a bigger sound by hitting a compressor BEFORE the converters. Converters do have sweet spots and headroom just the same as any other electronics.
Compressing for the sound is different than compressing to keep out of the red. You're making a tonal decision (which I highly endorse) not a technical one.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #9
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by who? View Post
I disagree. I’ve found that even in high resolution digital systems I can get a bigger sound
You mean a louder sound? Try having someone normalize your files for you and then blind-quiz you on which was which.

Quote:
by hitting a compressor BEFORE the converters.
a hardware compressor "after" the converters obviously goes through an extra ADDA. That counts for more than the 'sweet spot' of the converters. In any case, 0 on a converter is +18 on your analog gear. If you drive all your preamps to be close to +18 you will get the sound that people mistakenly call the "harsh sound of digital".

As they say on that website Gearslutz, "yellow is the new red".

Quote:
Converters do have sweet spots and headroom just the same as any other electronics.
IMO, this difference is small. Compared to the coloration imparted by the extra analog circuitry of the compressor - just by having a compressor there- it is minuscule . Compared to the coloration imparted by an extra ADDA it is negligible. I often print my compressors to DAW partly to avoid the extra conversion.

But only when I am certain of the sound I am going to want at the end. To me that is the trickiest part. A lot of things sound good "now", but when you have added 2 more guitars, a keyboard, a horn section and some backing vocals, they don't always fit in the mix.

To commit in tracking you need some experience in mixing.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #10
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Murky Waters's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
Does anyone know the real way the pros set up tracking for all band instruments?
There is no one real way. It's an art. If you are new to this and cannot establish a sonic vision to work towards, consider just trying to accurately capture the sounds of the instruments.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #11
Lives for gear
I watched a video of Genesis recording the album with the track Mama on it.

The engineer/producer was Hugh Padgham - great talent in his own right.

In the video you can hear him complaining about the desk EQ - and saying "if only we had a rack of Neve EQ's"

It really made me smile - honestly, no matter where you are on the ladder - you're aways going to have GAS and you're never going to be satisfied with your sound - even when you're making hit albums!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #12
Lives for gear
 

In the situations when someone else is producing and calling the shots, that person might decide how the session will be tracked...which mic to use or if an instrument will be recorded with compression or not.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #13
Gear Addict
 

Regarding committing to compression, last Friday evening, I got an unavoidable late start setting up for a Saturday session with a 9:00 start. I got up early to finish setup but, ended up cutting one corner thinking it would be fine.

I did not make the extra connection to allow for simultaneous parallel capture of the dry signals and compressed signals.

Things went well until the last vocal. Despite my best effort to set levels to keep the compression to 5-7 dB, the vocalist knocked us out with a powerful final run that was exceeding 15 dB of compression. Lesson learned, take the time to track parallel, no exceptions. Not that the vocal sounds terrible, I just wish I had captured it dry as I would have liked to try a few other techniques. That and a few other mistakes made in the heat of tracking were all a result of having to rush. In hindsight, I should have made other decisions during the week to ensure I had another 30 minutes of setup or, delayed the start by 30 minutes knowing it was for the best.

The good news is I will get to track it again because she messed up at the end of the take and we ran out of time. Hope she digs in again next time, you just never know.

Last edited by StevenLMorgan; 3 weeks ago at 11:20 PM..
Old 3 weeks ago
  #14
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chrischoir's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
One thing I have not figured out yet is how the pros track and record their musicians. I've been searching in regard to my favourite bands (RHCP, Led Zep, Pink Floyd) and cannot seem to find how the engineers set up the tracking chain.
There is plenty of info out there if you look hard enough.

https://www.soundonsound.com/
Sound on sound has lots of specific info. Also look on YT for video. Search here on GS. Alan Parsons has a Q&A here. As do some people that actually worked with Zeppelin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
People often talk about the mics they've used and the rooms but what about the way it was recorded in? I find this information hard to come by.
Watch video and look on google for images. Micing is very formulated. There is not really much to once you do it a couple times, at least with rock music in a controlled environment.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
I've heard people say they track with no dynamics or eq and then I see Ryan Hewitt talk about how he comp'd the sh*t out of the lumineers tracking them.
There are quite a few possible answers to this question. But for starters many people lie. Also they may only use compressors and eq depending on the artists or the songs or the based on production style. Keep in mind people that record on analog tape and in great tuned rooms, will use less EQ and compression.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
It also seems like something favorable to record and track guitar and bass with compression to prevent any clipping from big dynamics in playing no?
yes and no, since it depends. More often than not bass is going to be compressed. It is compressed for two reasons, to fix sloppy playing and to give the sound some texture. Sometimes they are compressed for both reasons, sometimes one or the other. Think of a compressor as a utility/cleanup device and as an Effects unit. It can be used for effect and for affect at the same time. As far as guitar it depends. Acoustic guitar and cleaner funk style guitar are compressed to fix sloppy playing and for texture. Distorted guitars are rarely compressed since guitar distortion is already compressed. So compressing it more will just suck the life out of it. I'm not saying it is never done or shouldn't be, but rarely is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
Does anyone know the real way the pros set up tracking for all band instruments?
It depends. Some bands play live with gobos some bands just overdub everything. Some bands all play live in isolation booths, Some bands don't play live at all, they play synths or samplers. Bands like Zeppelin and Floyd mostly played the basic tracks live using gobos and then overdubbed. This is documented extensively.

Also consider that Zep and Floyd only did music for their full time jobs. They had the best engineers, recorded in the best studios with access to the best gear. Also they recorded for months if not years on one album. That's why their records sound so good. Not to mention they had immense musical talent. Even if their recordings sounded bad they will still sound good to the ravage person becasue the songs were so good. You can have the best recorded/produced track but if the song is bad no cares to listen to it.

If we only had to record great bands in great studios with great mics, all day long for months with free food and drugs, how could it possibly not sound good? Recording a great sounding record showcasing a mediocre band, in a basement with minimal equipment after working 10 hour shift day jobs is a challenge. Recording a mega talented band everyday for 6 months at Abbey Road would not be overly difficult IMO. So put things in perspective. We do not have luxury.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrischoir View Post
Also consider that Zep and Floyd only did music for their full time jobs. They had the best engineers, recorded in the best studios with access to the best gear. Also they recorded for months if not years on one album. That's why their records sound so good. Not to mention they had immense musical talent. Even if their recordings sounded bad they will still sound good to the ravage person becasue the songs were so good. You can have the best recorded/produced track but if the song is bad no cares to listen to it.

If we only had to record great bands in great studios with great mics, all day long for months with free food and drugs, how could it possibly not sound good? Recording a great sounding record showcasing a mediocre band, in a basement with minimal equipment after working 10 hour shift day jobs is a challenge. Recording a mega talented band everyday for 6 months at Abbey Road would not be overly difficult IMO. So put things in perspective. We do not have luxury.
You might want to revise the statements in bold.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #16
Lives for gear
It's different with every pro.

I like to track with quite a bit of outboard. I have friends who like to track clean.

There is no real "way the pros do it" because every pro is a different human with different taste and experience.

You would probably be surprised to hear many top tier engineers talk about still trying to figure out the best way to record something. Things like "I've tracked in this room on hundreds of sessions and I still don't know how to get the rooms to sound quite right"
Old 3 weeks ago
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
You might want to revise the statements in bold.
The wall took one year to record. And that is not including the other 6 months for pre production. They started in summer 1978 and finished in December 1979.

As far as the other statements tell me why you disagree (in depth). A monkey could make a great record if they had Abbey road and its gear at their disposable for 12 months with a record company footing the bill. That would be a cakewalk. It's like I stated previously, try making the Wall with dive bar musicians in a random basement studio with lowend gear. Good luck with that. Most of these reason Classic records sound so good is because of the equipment and the rooms they used. Why do you think people spend so much money on classic gear and room acoustics?? It's becasue it gives you "that sound". It's no secret. Equipment and recording spaces are the reason records sound the way they do.

Listen to the "The Wall under construction" demos, then listen to the actually real record. What is the difference? I will tell you, it's the equipment and the live rooms. Nothing more. Give me Abbey Road or Oceanway locked out for 1 year along with an $advance$, free food, hookers and free drugs. I will produce the best sounding record ever made. No problem. It would be easy.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrischoir View Post
The wall took one year to record. And that is not including the other 6 months for pre production. They started in summer 1978 and finished in December 1979.

As far as the other statements tell me why you disagree (in depth). A monkey could make a great record if they had Abbey road and itsr gear at thier disposable for 12 months. That would be a cakewalk. It's like I stated previously, try making the Wall with dive bar musicians in a random basement studio with lowend gear. Good luck with that. Most of these reason Classic records sound so good is because of the equipment and the rooms they used. Why do you think people spend so much money on classic gear and room acoustics?? It's becasue it gives you "that sound". It's no secret. Equipment and recording spaces are the reason records sound the way they do. Listen to the "The Wall under construction" demos, then Listen to the actually real record. What is the difference? I will tell you, it's the equipment and the live rooms. Nothing more.
I'm not trying to underestimate the value or importance of a good studio and gear, but some of the greatest records of all time took days or weeks to make in less than ideal circumstances because of the talents of the people involved.

Most people couldn't write the songs, produce, record and mix a good album if you left them in the best sounding and equipped studio with the musicians of their choice for 5 years...and if what you say is taken at face value, Chinese Democracy would be the greatest album ever.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
I'm not trying to underestimate the value or importance of a good studio and gear, but some of the greatest records of all time took days or weeks to make in less than ideal circumstances because of the talents of the people involved.
Sure yes there are many records that tooks days or a couple weeks. Zeppelin I is a record that was supposedly done in a couple days. It's also common knowledge that Pink Floyd spent months and years in the studio on many of their records. For some artists that is what it takes to make great records. That's Ok. IMO that is a very cool approach too as is doing Black Sabbath in 2 days, record and mix.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
Most people couldn't write the songs, produce, record and mix a good album if you left them in the best sounding and equipped studio with the musicians of their choice for 5 years...and if what you say is taken at face value,
Well sure the band needs some talent and some chemistry to make it commercial successful but I honestly think any band that can write decent songs can also record masterpiece if give the time and equipment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
Chinese Democracy would be the greatest album ever.
This is a great sounding record, but the reason it took so long to record is becasue Axl and his engineers recorded it, and then re-recorded several times with several different producers as well as several different lineups of musicians. In the end, the reason why it didn't live up to the hype is becasue guys like DJ Alba, Buckethead and Bumblefoot have no songwriting talent. There was no songwriting chemistry. If Axl got the right songwriting partners he could have done a great commercial album. Sonically that album sounds great IMO. Axl has some talent. He has proven that. Also I think it is tough to stay focused if you have lots of money and l have already proven yourself. Even the members Beatles ran out of songs at some point.

IMO making a commercially successful record is all about following and fitting into trends, but if you want a great sounding record it's all about spending time with the right gear in a great room. I really do think anyone can make a great sounding record at Abbey Road or Ocean way. whether you can get airplay and subsequent billboard hits is a different debate. That is more about market timing and luck. Great sound and production is about great gear and great acoustics. That is all I am trying to convey. Even bands with minimal music performance talent can be coached and molded into something great in the studio, if given the time. In the end, recording is all very scientific and formulated. That means given the proper tools, environment and ample amount of time, the formula can be easily repeated time after time.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #20
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thismercifulfate View Post
No. This is a silly myth that is constantly put forth by noobies. Like joeq said, 24-bit digital recording allows for very generous headroom to be left. A real pro will not record super hot on a digital system in the first place and certainly will not use a compressor to “prevent clipping”. If they choose to use EQ or compression, it’s because they want to commit to the tone that it imparts.
Yes. If you "automatically" need compression to record Nathan East or Lee Sclar, then you're doing it all wrong.



Steve
Old 3 weeks ago
  #21
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Moonwhistle's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
One thing I have not figured out yet is how the pros track and record their musicians. I've been searching in regard to my favourite bands (RHCP, Led Zep, Pink Floyd) and cannot seem to find how the engineers set up the tracking chain.

People often talk about the mics they've used and the rooms but what about the way it was recorded in? I find this information hard to come by.

I've heard people say they track with no dynamics or eq and then I see Ryan Hewitt talk about how he comp'd the sh*t out of the lumineers tracking them.

It also seems like something favorable to record and track guitar and bass with compression to prevent any clipping from big dynamics in playing no?

Does anyone know the real way the pros set up tracking for all band instruments?
Get some first hand experience. It will cost you less than the hardware to track with.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #22
Quote:
Originally Posted by thehightenor View Post
I watched a video of Genesis recording the album with the track Mama on it.

The engineer/producer was Hugh Padgham - great talent in his own right.

In the video you can hear him complaining about the desk EQ - and saying "if only we had a rack of Neve EQ's"

It really made me smile - honestly, no matter where you are on the ladder - you're aways going to have GAS and you're never going to be satisfied with your sound - even when you're making hit albums!
I’ve worked at Hugh’s studio when he had it (sofa sound in Acton) - he had a rack of 10 vintage Neves! (And the SSL desk...)
Old 3 weeks ago
  #23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
One thing I have not figured out yet is how the pros track and record their musicians. I've been searching in regard to my favourite bands (RHCP, Led Zep, Pink Floyd) and cannot seem to find how the engineers set up the tracking chain.

People often talk about the mics they've used and the rooms but what about the way it was recorded in? I find this information hard to come by.

I've heard people say they track with no dynamics or eq and then I see Ryan Hewitt talk about how he comp'd the sh*t out of the lumineers tracking them.

It also seems like something favorable to record and track guitar and bass with compression to prevent any clipping from big dynamics in playing no?

Does anyone know the real way the pros set up tracking for all band instruments?
I’m not claiming to be one of “the pros” but I’ve definitely worked for a few of them!

Tracking a band - usually you’re in a studio which has some outboard. Usually, you’ll make some decisions on the way in - it’s much easier to build a project when you’re shaping the sounds as you go. Nothing worse than having to build character into sounds at the mix stage.

And that goes double for when you’re mixing ITB - it’s much easier if you’ve already committed some of that.

Speaking for myself, I’m lucky enough to have a studio with great outboard at my disposal - original pultecs and 1176s, distressors, many other EQs and compressors. So I’ll run through a fair bit of that on the way in, preempting later decisions.

For example - with drums, rooms will get quite a lot of compression, overheads a bit followed by some top lift on the eq. I’ll use a pultec bass boost on the kick, and maybe some snare compression.

Bass will usually get compression from an 1176. Guitars I sum 2 mics, run them through an 1176 and print to one track. Pianos get similar to the overheads. Keyboards often get some transformer drive from a preamp. Vocals get compression (sometimes 2 compressors) and maybe a tiny bit of eq.

Nothing is going crazy, but it all contributes. The more experienced the engineer and the more clear the end goal, generally the more processing you’ll do.

Does that help? At the same time, some people track very cleanly and do everything in post, but it’s rare an experienced engineer recording rock or similar would do that, IME.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
I’ve worked at Hugh’s studio when he had it (sofa sound in Acton) - he had a rack of 10 vintage Neves! (And the SSL desk...)
The video was filmed at Genesis's own studio The Farm in Surrey, I think the desk was an Amek IIRC, later they installed an SSL.

He didn't seem to like the EQ on the Amek and wanted a rack of Neve EQ's.

Sounds like he eventually got some for his own studio :-)

What I love about Hugh's productions in those days where the drums . - so upfront and massive.
The drums on Easy Lover as close to THE best rock drum sound I have ever heard.

I used to crank my old Mackie HR824's (those where fun monitors) to trouser flappin' volumes and play the track
and those drums where like 75% of the mix - really really fantastic - if you like that kinda thing!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #25
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Sigma's Avatar
Yup .good post man..only thing wrong is that I'd call you a pro
Old 3 weeks ago
  #26
You just have to do it over and over again until it will become intuitive.

You'll learn some tips and tricks along the way but like people pointed out every session is different so you can't just go ahead and say I'll always add this and that to instrument X . You will also develope your own taste so what is great to you might not be awesome for someone else. The thing is that you will be able to do things with a thought of having the bigger picture in mind and the result will reflect that.

It's an awesome feeling being in control and solve problems along the way. That's just experience like any other profession. Just know you have to spend 10k + hours to reach that level of expertise
Old 3 weeks ago
  #27
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
I'm not trying to underestimate the value or importance of a good studio and gear, but some of the greatest records of all time took days or weeks to make in less than ideal circumstances because of the talents of the people involved.
He did say great band.
I agree with everything he said.
Obviously music comes first.
Great rooms, great gear and time to burn isn’t going to produce anything without a good song.
That is what I understood from his post..
Old 3 weeks ago
  #28
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Extreme Mixing View Post
Yes. If you "automatically" need compression to record Nathan East or Lee Sclar, then you're doing it all wrong.

Steve
YOu're also not wrong if you want the sound of s certain compressor on those folks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonwhistle View Post
Get some first hand experience. It will cost you less than the hardware to track with.
THIS!

Quote:
Originally Posted by thehightenor View Post
The video was filmed at Genesis's own studio The Farm in Surrey, I think the desk was an Amek IIRC, later they installed an SSL.

He didn't seem to like the EQ on the Amek and wanted a rack of Neve EQ's.

Sounds like he eventually got some for his own studio :-)

What I love about Hugh's productions in those days where the drums . - so upfront and massive.
The drums on Easy Lover as close to THE best rock drum sound I have ever heard.

I used to crank my old Mackie HR824's (those where fun monitors) to trouser flappin' volumes and play the track
and those drums where like 75% of the mix - really really fantastic - if you like that kinda thing!
Easy Lover is a VERY drums heavy mix. You can tell two drummers wrote it.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobC335 View Post
He did say great band.
I agree with everything he said.
Obviously music comes first.
Great rooms, great gear and time to burn isn’t going to produce anything without a good song.
That is what I understood from his post..
There are too many variables to hang it on a simple formula is what I'm saying...If it was so easy everybody with enough money would be making massive hits everyday.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #30
Quote:
Originally Posted by thehightenor View Post
The video was filmed at Genesis's own studio The Farm in Surrey, I think the desk was an Amek IIRC, later they installed an SSL.

He didn't seem to like the EQ on the Amek and wanted a rack of Neve EQ's.

Sounds like he eventually got some for his own studio :-)

What I love about Hugh's productions in those days where the drums . - so upfront and massive.
The drums on Easy Lover as close to THE best rock drum sound I have ever heard.

I used to crank my old Mackie HR824's (those where fun monitors) to trouser flappin' volumes and play the track
and those drums where like 75% of the mix - really really fantastic - if you like that kinda thing!
Ah yes - I’ve worked there too actually, it used to be managed by Miloco - Mike’s son Harry was my assistant, and I was recording a young band featuring George Eve, who’s the son of Trevor Eve (Uk actor) and the Gold Blend lady (who I got to meet at one point)!

It was an SSL when I worked there - nice studio if small live rooms.
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