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Congrats to Drumsound
Old 3 weeks ago
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsound View Post
I don't mind a do over scenario. Its the "how about we add this, and then this ad nauseam" never having a vision. That's where the tape mentality comes in. "lets keep this, lets lose that." I think getting rid of things can be so useful for moving forward.
I agree totally, and in my experience they are related...the do-over mentality means no real commitment to what they play and how they play, because they can redo and/or add different bits until the cows come home. When musicians play for keep, they pay particular attention to what and how they play, the effort is not half-assed, there's less guessing about and less time wasted. This is where a 'real' producer can make a difference by giving positive directions and cut out the speculative BS.

There is a big difference in approach between experienced session players and engineers who've worked in busy commercial studios, and people who don't have the experience of working under serious budget and time pressure which I think are two of the main factors behind the shift your article speaks about. Plus, when we look at the fact that we are in an era when people fuss over which mic and pre they should use on the bottom of the snare while they pay little to no attention to the acoustics of the room they record in, the 100+ track sessions kinda makes sense.

Old 3 weeks ago
  #32
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
I agree totally, and in my experience they are related...the do-over mentality means no real commitment to what they play and how they play, because they can redo and/or add different bits until the cows come home. When musicians play for keep, they pay particular attention to what and how they play, the effort is not half-assed, there's less guessing about and less time wasted. This is where a 'real' producer can make a difference by giving positive directions and cut out the speculative BS.

There is a big difference in approach between experienced session players and engineers who've worked in busy commercial studios, and people who don't have the experience of working under serious budget and time pressure which I think are two of the main factors behind the shift your article speaks about. Plus, when we look at the fact that we are in an era when people fuss over which mic and pre they should use on the bottom of the snare while they pay little to no attention to the acoustics of the room they record in, the 100+ track sessions kinda makes sense.

That video is great. I think it also speaks to the flexibility factor. Players can make changes on the fly, add, subtract, or alter as needed.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #33
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Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsound View Post
I know that sync allowed for such things and that a ton of records were made that way. There's a story about Whitney Houston filling a slave reel for "I will always love you" and then the producer made a comp. Then he made Whitney learn to sing the comp, and they filled ANOTHER slave reel full of takes of her singing the "comp style."
Dude Michael Masser used 12 twenty four track slave reels for 1 Whitney song..just for vocals at sigma NY..can you say WTF? she could sing!..it was as bad as Protools people never making a decision..because of that i had to do 8 tracks of Sheena Easton..[err because she took over the session from my producer] then she put numbers not just over words but syllables to test differnt "feels" ..only session i walked from..if you turned on all 8 they phased..i said i'm the wrong engineer i'll come back to mix the album [only time i ever bailed on a session] i still remember her saying "Michael Masser does it"..lol im from 1 take and punch in the lead vox we only have 22 tracks [2 automation ]..to me that's some BS ego ****

BTW congrats bro tape op is a good mag

Last edited by Sigma; 3 weeks ago at 07:04 PM..
Old 3 weeks ago
  #34
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Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
Dude Michael Masser used 12 twenty four track slave reels for 1 Whitney song..just for vocals at sigma NY..can you say WTF? she could sing!..it was as bad as Protools people never making a decision..because of that i had to do 8 tracks of Sheena Easton..[err because she took over the session from my producer] then she put numbers not just over words but syllables to test differnt "feels" ..only session i walked from..if you turned on all 8 they phased..i said i'm the wrong engineer i'll come back to mix the album [only time i ever bailed on a session] i still remember her saying "Michael Masser does it"..lol im from 1 take and punch in the lead vox we only have 22 tracks [2 automation ]..to me that's some BS ego ****

BTW congrats bro tape op is a good mag
Wow, 12 SLAVE REELS!?!?!? That is bananas. Thanks for the story and thanks for reading the piece.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #35
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
Dude Michael Masser used 12 twenty four track slave reels for 1 Whitney song...
Wow. I've never worked on records much, but I cut a new verse on a Nona Hendryx record one day -- she had changed a couple words and the writer got pissed -- and I don't think she or the producer even took off their coats.

Much more suited to my attention span.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #36
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Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Wow. I've never worked on records much, but I cut a new verse on a Nona Hendryx record one day -- she had changed a couple words and the writer got pissed -- and I don't think she or the producer even took off their coats.

Much more suited to my attention span.
I'll bet you punched in to the lead vocal, too...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #37
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsound View Post
I'll bet you punched in to the lead vocal, too...
Actually, I'm pretty sure it was on a slave tape that had the tv track and the original vocal on it.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #38
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Sigma's Avatar
lol
Old 3 weeks ago
  #39
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Funny Cat's Avatar
@ Drumsound

Got my Tape Op. :0) Great article man. I would really love to work this way a LOT more. In time I suppose. I see a resurgence happening.

I loved the part about musician's union fines for bands that go over 24 tracks on a session!

One thing that really resonated with me is how you get this cool atmosphere going when bands play together and you blend and bus sounds together.

You don't need as many tracks for drums etc. to punch thru and have a sense of space bc all the other mics are contributing to the cohesiveness and depth of the sound.

Bleed, in one word.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #40
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
From Tony's End Rant in the June/July issue:

It was my normal policy not to lie to clients... but sometimes you have to serve the Greater Good.
I love it. It forces the creativity into a specific box so that the work may procede on schedule. I did most of my work on ADAT's. I was hell on wheels punching in vocals and guitars with a BRC. I bet the real isue was a 24 channel mixer & Tape.

I call the record button "It's the history erasure button you fool!" anouncer pops in......"Can he resist the diabolical urge to press the button that will earase our mear existance"
Wren & Stimpy
Old 3 weeks ago
  #41
Lives for gear
 

New slogan... "Just undo it".

Great thread!

How about telling the musicians... "Let's just pretend we're "one take" Jazz Cats"!

Back in the day (in Russia), a strong amateur chess player, was hypnotized to think he was the greatest chess player ever.

He played a short match, with the legendary "Magician of Riga" Mikhail Tal, and got a draw! (IIRC out of five games)
When asked, Tal said the amateur played FAR above his level.

So... Could this be a hidden cash cow to keep a hypnotist, on the studio staff?
Chris
Old 3 weeks ago
  #42
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Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Funny Cat View Post
@ Drumsound

Got my Tape Op. :0) Great article man. I would really love to work this way a LOT more. In time I suppose. I see a resurgence happening.

I loved the part about musician's union fines for bands that go over 24 tracks on a session!

One thing that really resonated with me is how you get this cool atmosphere going when bands play together and you blend and bus sounds together.

You don't need as many tracks for drums etc. to punch thru and have a sense of space bc all the other mics are contributing to the cohesiveness and depth of the sound.

Bleed, in one word.
Thanks for reading and commenting. Committing to sounds, blends, and whatnot really shape a record as its made.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elegentdrum View Post
I love it. It forces the creativity into a specific box so that the work may procede on schedule. I did most of my work on ADAT's. I was hell on wheels punching in vocals and guitars with a BRC. I bet the real isue was a 24 channel mixer & Tape.

I call the record button "It's the history erasure button you fool!" anouncer pops in......"Can he resist the diabolical urge to press the button that will earase our mear existance"
Wren & Stimpy
I love how tape machines (even digital ones) erase to record. Its like "Oh, you don't like that? OK, BYE!"
I could punch syllables on ADAT back in the day. On the fly, not even using the auto punch. On the RADAR, too. Probably even on my JH24. The 3M was a little tougher, because the relays were slow and it would SOUND like you blew the out, but on playback, it was fine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessparov2.0 View Post
New slogan... "Just undo it".

Great thread!

How about telling the musicians... "Let's just pretend we're "one take" Jazz Cats"!

Back in the day (in Russia), a strong amateur chess player, was hypnotized to think he was the greatest chess player ever.

He played a short match, with the legendary "Magician of Riga" Mikhail Tal, and got a draw! (IIRC out of five games)
When asked, Tal said the amateur played FAR above his level.

So... Could this be a hidden cash cow to keep a hypnotist, on the studio staff?
Chris
Studio Hypnotist, I LIKE IT!!!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #43
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chessparov2.0 View Post
New slogan... "Just undo it".

Great thread!

How about telling the musicians... "Let's just pretend we're "one take" Jazz Cats"!

Back in the day (in Russia), a strong amateur chess player, was hypnotized to think he was the greatest chess player ever.

He played a short match, with the legendary "Magician of Riga" Mikhail Tal, and got a draw! (IIRC out of five games)
When asked, Tal said the amateur played FAR above his level.

So... Could this be a hidden cash cow to keep a hypnotist, on the studio staff?
Chris
I need somebody to hypnotize me and make me think I’m Tal. I’m not sure my liver could handle the amount of vodka he drank but I would love to play just one game in my entire life with the sort of brilliance he exhibited on a regular basis.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #44
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Silvertone's Avatar
Congrats Tony. Can you post the article in this thread?

I didn’t read the article as I don’t get Tape Op anymore. Let’s just say Larry wasn’t very nice to me about my articles I’d write for Tape Op.

Anyway, I have always pretty much cut the rhythm section together and only overdub vocals and lead instruments. Sometimes I even cut the whole band in one shot. Most groups love doing it that way. I know I do.

It’s the whole basis for my 3 track tube studio set up. Capture lightning in a bottle!

Would love to read your article.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #45
Gear Guru
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Wow. I've never worked on records much, but I cut a new verse on a Nona Hendryx record one day -- she had changed a couple words and the writer got pissed -- and I don't think she or the producer even took off their coats.

Much more suited to my attention span.
Isn't that a trick artists use to get a credit for lyrics? I'd heard that and could very well be wrong.......
Old 3 weeks ago
  #46
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardis View Post
Isn't that a trick artists use to get a credit for lyrics? I'd heard that and could very well be wrong.......
I don't remember the specifics, but I don't think that was the case here.

In my limited exposure to that, mostly via eavesdropping, seems to me that when an artist or producer wants a piece of your song in exchange for cutting it, they just upfront say so.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #47
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monkeyxx's Avatar
One thing I like about tape op is the DIY/chummy vibe of the magazine. And mostly I like the more technical articles that get published.

Tony, I was going to PM you to congratulate you on the nice page but I saw this thread.

Anyway I loved it. I skip through Tape Op and read only 2 or 3 things that interest me this was one of them.

I'm like the other poster. I don't know another way to work. I used to think I was handicapped or something. Everyone else finds it so easy to stack tracks but I've just never been remotely interested in that style of production. I'd like to learn how to do it eventually, watch someone else do it.

I am just now learning drum editing in Cubase in 2019. I "comp" almost never. Some people never really got away from the old way of working.

Although I did a project for a band, that was only one song, it took me multiple days to even make it listenable. I had to edit every part and "construct" the feel and time of the song. It was insane. None of them could even play their parts. It was outrageous and I hated it. The song came out great though. I would never want to be presented with jobs like that as a regular part of my life.

I'm moving even further back to this tape style of recording when I eventually will get my Mix Pre 6 from Sound Devices. That's going to give me 6 inputs to work with and only a total of 12 tracks in the "DAW." I'm pretty excited about it to be honest.

I'll have to brush up on my Glyn Johns, Recorderman type of drum techniques. It will be a fun challenge.

Last edited by monkeyxx; 3 weeks ago at 07:23 PM..
Old 3 weeks ago
  #48
Gear Addict
 

This thread dovetails well with another thread about production techniques in the 60s/70s and how a production is built. In my somewhat limited experience it's often about whether or not someone has the 'vision' of the song already or at least most of it. As a songwriter, musician, performer, engineer etc I know some songs just write themselves and when it's time to record the takes just happen and it all falls into place. Al the players get it and are on the same page and wavelength. Those moments when you feel like you're just some kind of music antenna picking up this music from somewhere else and simply channeling it. The song already existed before it was played the first time.

Some players are also just better at recording. Drummer I work with a lot, one song he did the entire drum take to click without any backing tracks because he knew his part and the song so well. It wasn't an easy track either, almost Niel Peart-ish. Some folks are just 1 - 4 takes max and done.

Then the are those times it's like digging a hole in sand. It's vague and blurry and you're fighting to get that 'thing'. Every line on the lyric page has been crossed out more than once. You try 10 tempos and 5 keys. 50 rewrites. Then people just start throwing all sort of ideas at it and the tracks build up until it's a messy miasma of disconnected sounds. Then someone has to go and make something of it. Mixing, editing, comping etc etc Not sure if it was Michelangelo but a quote I love is "The statue is already in the stone. I just have to remove what doesn't belong."
Old 3 weeks ago
  #49
Lives for gear
 

Problem is, this is how your clients, (band and producer) want to work...what do you do then?

I recently worked with a band from the Netherlands specifically because they wanted me to produce/record them playing together. First song and the guitarist took all day to record over 24 tracks that in the end were totally useless. The cost of the studio time and my threats to walk put a stop to the foolishness the next day, and we were able to record three songs on day two...everything except the vocals were cut in four days (ten songs) and the biggest track count was 20.

The number of songs per album is also another thing I keep an eye on when I'm producing, 12 is the absolute maximum I'll do but my preference is 10. If the band comes in with more songs, which is always the case, we'll gradually whittle it down to between 10 and 12 during the production process.

Last edited by Samc; 3 weeks ago at 05:58 PM..
Old 3 weeks ago
  #50
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
I don't remember the specifics, but I don't think that was the case here.

In my limited exposure to that, mostly via eavesdropping, seems to me that when an artist or producer wants a piece of your song in exchange for cutting it, they just upfront say so.
This is usually so, and this is exactly what happened on the project I'm working on now. Singer didn't write any of the songs but he negotiated and got a cut of the publishing for his participation.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #51
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone View Post
Congrats Tony. Can you post the article in this thread?

I didn’t read the article as I don’t get Tape Op anymore. Let’s just say Larry wasn’t very nice to me about my articles I’d write for Tape Op.

Anyway, I have always pretty much cut the rhythm section together and only overdub vocals and lead instruments. Sometimes I even cut the whole band in one shot. Most groups love doing it that way. I know I do.

It’s the whole basis for my 3 track tube studio set up. Capture lightning in a bottle!

Would love to read your article.
Ask and you shall receive
https://tapeop.com/columns/end-rant/131/
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
Yes I need to restrain myself from making comments about Larry's format since it's tempting enough. One thing I do like is the DIY/chummy vibe of the magazine.

Tony, I was going to PM you to congratulate you on the nice page but I saw this thread.

Anyway I loved it. I skip through Tape Op and read only 2 or 3 things that interest me this was one of them.

I'm like the other poster. I don't know another way to work. I used to think I was handicapped or something. Everyone else finds it so easy to stack tracks but I've just never been remotely interested in that style of production. I'd like to learn how to do it eventually, watch someone else do it.

I am just now learning drum editing in Cubase in 2019. I "comp" almost never. Some people never really got away from the old way of working.

Although I did a project for a band, that was only one song, it took me multiple days to even make it listenable. I had to edit every part and "construct" the feel and time of the song. It was insane. None of them could even play their parts. It was outrageous and I hated it. The song came out great though. I would never want to be presented with jobs like that as a regular part of my life.

I'm moving even further back to this tape style of recording when I eventually will get my Mix Pre 6 from Sound Devices. That's going to give me 6 inputs to work with and only a total of 12 tracks in the "DAW." I'm pretty excited about it to be honest.

I'll have to brush up on my Glyn Johns, Recorderman type of drum techniques. It will be a fun challenge.
I'm honored to have made the cut on the things you read in the magazine! Thanks for taking the time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tymish View Post
This thread dovetails well with another thread about production techniques in the 60s/70s and how a production is built. In my somewhat limited experience it's often about whether or not someone has the 'vision' of the song already or at least most of it. As a songwriter, musician, performer, engineer etc I know some songs just write themselves and when it's time to record the takes just happen and it all falls into place. Al the players get it and are on the same page and wavelength. Those moments when you feel like you're just some kind of music antenna picking up this music from somewhere else and simply channeling it. The song already existed before it was played the first time.

Some players are also just better at recording. Drummer I work with a lot, one song he did the entire drum take to click without any backing tracks because he knew his part and the song so well. It wasn't an easy track either, almost Niel Peart-ish. Some folks are just 1 - 4 takes max and done.

Then the are those times it's like digging a hole in sand. It's vague and blurry and you're fighting to get that 'thing'. Every line on the lyric page has been crossed out more than once. You try 10 tempos and 5 keys. 50 rewrites. Then people just start throwing all sort of ideas at it and the tracks build up until it's a messy miasma of disconnected sounds. Then someone has to go and make something of it. Mixing, editing, comping etc etc Not sure if it was Michelangelo but a quote I love is "The statue is already in the stone. I just have to remove what doesn't belong."
I've done things a lot of ways over the years, but its not often I do something like recording just the drums to a click. I did, however do that on a record my own band did. We weren't getting anything useful tracking as a band. We tried just me and one other member (each of the other members, but one at a time), and various combinations of 3 (of 4) of us. I eventually put a click on and recorded the drums alone. Luckily, it felt good and I nailed the form. A good friend was engineering the session so I could focus on playing. After I cut my part, I told the other guys "I'm going to eat dinner, do your parts while I'm gone." It turned out great. For me thats the exception to the rule.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
Problem is, this is how your clients, (band and producer) want to work...what do you do then?

I recently worked with a band from the Netherlands specifically because they wanted me to produce/record them playing together. First song and the guitarist took all day to record over 24 tracks that in the end were totally useless. The cost of the studio time and my threats to walk put a stop to the foolishness the next day, and we were able to record three songs on day two...everything except the vocals were cut in four days (ten songs) and the biggest track count was 20.

The number of songs per album is also another thing I keep an eye on when I'm producing, 12 is the absolute maximum I'll do but my preference is 10. If the band comes in with more songs, which is always the case, we'll gradually whittle it down to between 10 and 12 during the production process.
I've had similar situations. Once you get people comfortable, they make MUSIC and everybody's super happy.

I do want to point out that, yes I do usually track the band together for basics, that wasn't meant to be the point to the piece. I do find it interesting that this is where the discussion has gone, though.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #52
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsound View Post
I do want to point out that, yes I do usually track the band together for basics, that wasn't meant to be the point to the piece. I do find it interesting that this is where the discussion has gone, though.
I mentioned this technique originally because it's less likely that someone is going to go off the rails when records are tracked this way because at least the rhythm section is locked, like in the video I posted with the Nashville session players.

In my experience when you start bringing in players one at a time it leaves the door open for all kinds of individual initiatives and doubts etc. This is general of course, but I find it happens less when everybody work out the song together and just move ahead.

Plus, when the band is moving at light speed, the last thing the engineer want to do is get in the way of the production...so no time to try out the six mic and Six preamp on snare technique you read about on Gearslutz.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #53
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
I mentioned this technique originally because it's less likely that someone is going to go off the rails when records are tracked this way because at least the rhythm section is locked, like in the video I posted with the Nashville session players.

In my experience when you start bringing in players one at a time it leaves the door open for all kinds of individual initiatives and doubts etc. This is general of course, but I find it happens less when everybody work out the song together and just move ahead.

Plus, when the band is moving at light speed, the last thing the engineer want to do is get in the way of the production...so no time to try out the six mic and Six preamp on snare technique you read about on Gearslutz.
I absolutely agree with you. ITs that whole idea of seeing the record take shape. I don't think you get that with a click and drums.

I read a piece about XTC recording Skylarking a while back. They talked about how everything was done to clicks and MIDI, and worked that way for weeks (or months) with Todd Rundgren at Bearsville in upstate NY. They then went to LA and did drums with Prairie Prince LAST. I think it was Colin Moulding who said something like "it didn't really sound like a record until we cut the drums."
To me that's BONKERS.

I will admit, I really like the record anyway.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #54
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Wow. I've never worked on records much, but I cut a new verse on a Nona Hendryx record one day -- she had changed a couple words and the writer got pissed -- and I don't think she or the producer even took off their coats.

Much more suited to my attention span.
First thing I thought of:

Old 3 weeks ago
  #55
Gear Guru
I think that Nashville guy was in Boston as a Jr Operator LOL!..... There was a session at the studio downstairs where I worked, where the band asked to go back to take 3 or something in a 15 take session, and got a panicked look from the kid running the board. You can guess the rest.......

Great article and honestly having a gazillion choices in this ADD world, isn't great. I went to a school that was one of the best wrestling schools out there. They taught three moves and being better at them than anyone else..... I do think of that with gear, takes, etc, really knowing what you're working with, and listening decisively is a wonderful discipline. This goes doubly if you're working on you own and multitracking. Otherwise you can spend endless time noodling...

These days you can keep pretty much everything so you're not really going out on a huge limb!.....Any real design project is to give yourself limits, and learn how to work around them.....The best guys in the field are the most decisive.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardis View Post
Any real design project is to give yourself limits, and learn how to work around them.....The best guys in the field are the most decisive.
Nothing works like a budget to keep people in check..."Chinese Democracy" is a perfect example of how wrong things can get without limits.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #57
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whoopysnorp View Post
First thing I thought of:

Niiiiiice. I love that one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardis View Post
I think that Nashville guy was in Boston as a Jr Operator LOL!..... There was a session at the studio downstairs where I worked, where the band asked to go back to take 3 or something in a 15 take session, and got a panicked look from the kid running the board. You can guess the rest.......

Great article and honestly having a gazillion choices in this ADD world, isn't great. I went to a school that was one of the best wrestling schools out there. They taught three moves and being better at them than anyone else..... I do think of that with gear, takes, etc, really knowing what you're working with, and listening decisively is a wonderful discipline. This goes doubly if you're working on you own and multitracking. Otherwise you can spend endless time noodling...

These days you can keep pretty much everything so you're not really going out on a huge limb!.....Any real design project is to give yourself limits, and learn how to work around them.....The best guys in the field are the most decisive.
Thanks for reading it. I'm with you, there no need to having a ton of stuff that isn't moving you forward. I am guilty of keeping most of the basics, just because drive space is cheap. Its been useful on occasion.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
Nothing works like a budget to keep people in check..."Chinese Democracy" is a perfect example of how wrong things can get without limits.
PERFECT!

I actually assumed actual Chinese Democracy was going to happen before the record ever got released.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #58
Lives for gear
 

"Chinese Democracy" Didn't they used to open for "Gang of Four", back in the 80's?:

Old Chinese fortune cookie say "he who keeps too many scratch tracks, ends up with sticky shed fingers!".
Old 3 weeks ago
  #59
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kennybro's Avatar
Yeah, great article Tony! Most excellent!

Many of us who grew up with tape never shook that mindset. The constantly-required decisions keep brains engaged and stimulated. I think that this could be one of the bigger problems with unlimited track count. Too many engineers (and musicians too) disengage mentally during the tracking process because they think there is simply no need anymore to bother with thinking in terms of what's not needed. Throw every single idea that emerges onto a track, and sort it out in post. This ends up taking far longer than the triage approach to tracking. But worse, the final result is void of the aesthetic benefits brought to the track by those hours of performance-stage decision interaction and emotion.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #60
Lives for gear
 

Thanks again Tony for posting your article here. Yes, it's terrific!

One of my things on my "bucket list", is to get recorded by a top L.A. or Orange County AE, and I want to follow just what you outlined.
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