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Tuning the kick - which note?
Old 18th May 2019
  #31
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In my experience an acoustic drum will have more punch and power if all lug points are in tune with each other. The pitch will be distinct and audible. If I start to detune the lugs while tapping 2” in from the rim and listening to the prominent harmonic, skewing each lug so the harmonic is all over the place from lug to lug, I now have a hard time hearing a fundamental tone. And in my opinion the drum sounds like ass. There’s no power or punch and usually the drum has obnoxious ringing tones.

Agree the kick should not be stepping on the bass or other instruments. The drum kit, real or sampled, should be in tune with itself first, then fit with the rest of the arrangement and not clash harmonically. Sometimes this means changing the pitch of the drum. And damping the kick in various ways.
Old 19th May 2019
  #32
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chrischoir's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
When no particular frequency dominates over the others, it only has an Indefinite Pitch.
I wonder how Fourier analysis handles that phenom??


Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
Transients are sounds in the universe and they have no "frequency" , because they do not repeat. Who can say what the "frequency" of a single shock wave is?
Joe, transients are the higher amplitudes of a signal. So one wouldn't think they have a frequency. It simply is not applicable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by voodoo4u View Post
Joeq I'm surprised to see you saying that. Most of the time your posts are spot on.
Uh oh
Old 19th May 2019
  #33
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by voodoo4u View Post
Joeq I'm surprised to see you saying that. Most of the time your posts are spot on.
I am spot on. I never said a kick drum cannot have a definite pitch. But I am simply saying that a drum is perfectly capable of having an indefinite pitch There are people in this thread who seem to not even be able to grasp the concept. They think everything must have a measurable "note".

Quote:
. One, the drum itself has a resonant frequency....Two if you put one skin on it, the skin itself can be tuned.. It can have vibrations that are either tuned to or out of synch with the resonant frequency of the drum... .
There are people in the thread who seem to be having trouble with the "or out" part!

And all I am saying is that you don't have to tune both heads to agree with that frequency or agree with the bass. In fact as I already mentioned, I personally tend to avoid that sound. The head can also be tuned imperfectly so that it is not producing a single "note". In fact, this youtube video shows a popular snare drum tuning method that deliberately mis-tensions the lugs. I highly recommend watching this video even if you never tune a snare drum, because it is a perfect example of indefinite pitches.

Quote:
AND, now you've trapped a volume of air inside the drum
This is exactly what I have been saying. The kick drum is capable of producing a multiplicity of tones. Once no single tone has a 'majority' of the sound, the sound can no longer be said to have a 'note'.

Quote:
It can give you a very complex series of overtones which is what you're referring to.
No. This is incorrect. The multiple pitches being produced are NOT "overtones". Go back and read the Wikipedia article.
Quote:
Sounds with indefinite pitch do not have harmonic spectra or have altered harmonic spectra—a characteristic known as inharmonicity.
They are competing frequencies, all equally valid, rendering the question "what is the note of this drum?" moot. You can certainly tune this drum (or a gunshot) "up" and "down" but you cannot tune it to a "D", because it is making too many different sounds at once. These sounds are not 'overtones or harmonics of some underlying 'fundamental' sound. They are independent sounds of their own. Their relationship to each other could be harmonically related - but that is under the control of the person who tuned the drum. Some of those persons, such as myself, are not seeking the type of "agreement" that many other persons are seeking.

Quote:
But it doesn't mean the drum itself doesn't have natural, fundamental frequency.
What is 'the drum itself'. Do you mean the wood shell? Why should the wood shell be considered more 'fundamental' than the tension of the top head, or the bottom head, or the volume of air? If the 'wood' is it, how can anyone ever tune their guitar to E-flat? If no one of the competing frequencies is significantly 'louder' than the others, then no one can be declared the "fundamental" in any objective sense? That's the point of indefinite pitch.

If you take a wine glass and strike it, it will produce a clear tone. If you sample that wine glass you can fine tune your sampler up and down until it 'merges' with your piano. Try the same thing with an indefinitely-pitched kick drum and you will find places where some part of it merges with your piano, but another part does not. You make it higher or lower but you will never be satisfied that it is 'in tune'. And that's my point. That's the difference between a Rock kick that goes "BAM!" and an EDM kick that is really just a "very short bass."

No objective tuning device will be able to tell you what "note" an indefinitely pitched kick is "at". You can't calculate the 'fundamental' by analyzing the harmonics, because those other tones are not harmonics. They are - in a very real sense - "additional fundamentals". Once you have more than one fundamental, the very word fundamental kind of loses its meaning.

They can be totally unrelated. I did not invent Indefinite Pitch. Classical music has made significant use of the distinction between (for example) Bass Drum and Tympani for centuries.

Again, I would ask those who seem to be saying that everything necessarily has "a" fundamental frequency, what is the fundamental frequency of this:
Old 19th May 2019
  #34
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Tune the kick and snare to match with the Cymbals!
Cymbals in tune with each other is the most diffciult detail becase you can't tune them, only pick them.
Old 19th May 2019
  #35
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chrischoir's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
The kick drum is capable of producing a multiplicity of tones.
A real kick drum will ring a specific note and then harmonics.
Old 19th May 2019
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrischoir View Post
A real kick drum will ring a specific note and then harmonics.
Nonsense. A real kick drum can ring a specific note. There's a difference. I am not saying you can't tune a kick drum to ring to a specific note.

But you can also tune a kick drum to have no specific note. That can truly demonstrate obvious inharmonicity . Plus, if I don't care about aesthetics, I can do it a fraction of the time that you can tune the drum to have a single, clear and obvious pitch. I can take your perfectly tuned kick drum and put it not only out of tune with any specific note, but out of tune with itself in just a few seconds with a few random twists of the key. Then it will produce many sounds - most (if not all) of which are NOT harmonically related in any way.

Perhaps if I post the Wikipedia link AGAIN some people might take the time to read it.
Definite and Indefinite Pitch
Quote:
Sounds with indefinite pitch do not have harmonic spectra or have altered harmonic spectra—a characteristic known as inharmonicity.
Then again, they would have to not only read it, but understand it, so maybe I am asking for too much.

I must say I am truly stunned by the people calling themselves "Audio Engineers" who have apparently never even heard of Indefinite Pitch. In fact, once we subtract musical instruments, it is quite likely that the majority of sounds in the world are indefinite pitch. Earthquakes and volcanoes. Waterfalls. The wind blowing through the leaves of a tree.

What is the belief you have that substitutes for this concept? Do you really believe that "deep down" a gunshot has a pitch? Do you think that "Fourier analysis" will somehow reveal it to you?.

And how about that white noise? I am still waiting for people to answer the question when I posted that YouTube. What is the "pitch" of that white noise in that clip? What "note" is it producing? Apply whatever 'analysis' tools you like and answer the question.

Then when you are done, sample it and tune it up to a C#

Last edited by joeq; 19th May 2019 at 05:16 PM..
Old 19th May 2019
  #37
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bigbone's Avatar
 

You don't tune a drums to a note.you tension
a drums to a tone.
Old 19th May 2019
  #38
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toledo3's Avatar
 

There is so much needless arguing over semantics in this thread. So let me add to that.

If you have the beater side skin on a bass drum evenly tensioned at each lug, it definitely makes a “note” in the same way that a timpani kettle makes a note. Just as a timpani is written for pitches, a bass drum can have a “note”. But it’s a bit out of the norm for there not to be a bit of dampening going on, that immediately takes it to a place of having a different effect.

Altering the tension of lugs so that one is more tight or loose, starts to create effects that can be perceived as pitch bends. Same as having a front head that is tighter or looser than the beater side. It can have the effect of the pitch seeming to bend up or down in various ways.

Adding built in mufflers, doing the “towel trick” or cushions inside the drum, putting extra pads where the beater hits to add definition...if we take a few steps back, how different is it really than prepared piano? Attaching mufflers, clips, etc, and inducing inharmonic behavior to make creative effects?

You take that to far extremes, and the bass drum is not creating a “note” anymore. Which is a whole world of bass drum sounds that people go for, that work great when you want that.

To the original poster...there are just many ways of tuning and preparing the bass drum that get different results, and are just the ticket in different contexts. It might help to focus in on a very specific type of kick drum sound you want to achieve, then experiment until you get there. Try your best guess as to what’s going on, and keep trying different things until you home in on it. You’ll at least learn things along the way.

I’ve never ventured into YouTube to see if people have made any worthwhile videos along the lines of “this is how to get a Motown kick sound”, or “this is how to get a Metallica kick sound” etc...but I’m guessing there are nowadays, and spending some time checking out some different ways to setup the bass drum and then trying it on your own will be constructive.
Old 19th May 2019
  #39
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toledo3's Avatar
 

I think that when lugs are at different tension points, once you start getting past the pitch bendy sounds and into more inharmonic outcome, what is going on at a certain level is a wave interference effect.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_interference
Old 19th May 2019
  #40
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voodoo4u's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
I am spot on. I never said a kick drum cannot have a definite pitch. But I am simply saying that a drum is perfectly capable of having an indefinite pitch There are people in this thread who seem to not even be able to grasp the concept. They think everything must have a measurable "note".

There are people in the thread who seem to be having trouble with the "or out" part!

And all I am saying is that you don't have to tune both heads to agree with that frequency or agree with the bass. In fact as I already mentioned, I personally tend to avoid that sound. The head can also be tuned imperfectly so that it is not producing a single "note". In fact, this youtube video shows a popular snare drum tuning method that deliberately mis-tensions the lugs. I highly recommend watching this video even if you never tune a snare drum, because it is a perfect example of indefinite pitches.


This is exactly what I have been saying. The kick drum is capable of producing a multiplicity of tones. Once no single tone has a 'majority' of the sound, the sound can no longer be said to have a 'note'.


No. This is incorrect. The multiple pitches being produced are NOT "overtones". Go back and read the Wikipedia article.

They are competing frequencies, all equally valid, rendering the question "what is the note of this drum?" moot. You can certainly tune this drum (or a gunshot) "up" and "down" but you cannot tune it to a "D", because it is making too many different sounds at once. These sounds are not 'overtones or harmonics of some underlying 'fundamental' sound. They are independent sounds of their own. Their relationship to each other could be harmonically related - but that is under the control of the person who tuned the drum. Some of those persons, such as myself, are not seeking the type of "agreement" that many other persons are seeking.


What is 'the drum itself'. Do you mean the wood shell? Why should the wood shell be considered more 'fundamental' than the tension of the top head, or the bottom head, or the volume of air? If the 'wood' is it, how can anyone ever tune their guitar to E-flat? If no one of the competing frequencies is significantly 'louder' than the others, then no one can be declared the "fundamental" in any objective sense? That's the point of indefinite pitch.

If you take a wine glass and strike it, it will produce a clear tone. If you sample that wine glass you can fine tune your sampler up and down until it 'merges' with your piano. Try the same thing with an indefinitely-pitched kick drum and you will find places where some part of it merges with your piano, but another part does not. You make it higher or lower but you will never be satisfied that it is 'in tune'. And that's my point. That's the difference between a Rock kick that goes "BAM!" and an EDM kick that is really just a "very short bass."

No objective tuning device will be able to tell you what "note" an indefinitely pitched kick is "at". You can't calculate the 'fundamental' by analyzing the harmonics, because those other tones are not harmonics. They are - in a very real sense - "additional fundamentals". Once you have more than one fundamental, the very word fundamental kind of loses its meaning.

They can be totally unrelated. I did not invent Indefinite Pitch. Classical music has made significant use of the distinction between (for example) Bass Drum and Tympani for centuries.

Again, I would ask those who seem to be saying that everything necessarily has "a" fundamental frequency, what is the fundamental frequency of this:
This was such a long post filled with detail. It's going to be a little hard to parse it all out and respond to everything, but I'll give it a try.

First of all, I think you and I are mostly in agreement in much of the details. I think we both agree that Kick drums are tonally complex. They can be tuned to produce a clear sustained tone full of complex overtones or they can be tuned and damped to create multiple pitches with such quick decay that we can't discern a clear pitch.

Now here's where you've misunderstood:

No it's not incorrect that overtones are produced. Overtones (harmonic series) are produced along with multiple fundamentals (likely three) The resonance of the shell and the vibrations produced by two heads. Here's an example: assuming that the shell produces a fairly low fundamental, the two heads also produce two fairly low fundamentals of "indefinite pitch" now apply a low pass filter at even as high as 500hz to your drum of indefinite pitch and then try to tell me the drum hasn't produced frequencies greater than the fundamentals. These frequencies are not "independent sounds of their own" they're clearly produced by the vibrations of fundamentals and harmonics of the three main elements. as well as the volume of air inside the drum, one shell and two heads and may be too complex to create a defined measurable tone, but they're not entirely random or out of nowhere.

"Why should the wood shell be considered more 'fundamental' than the tension of the top head?" You missed the point here and you're using the term "fundamental" with two different meanings. I'll repeat this because you might have missed it the first time. Everything that has MASS, when struck, can and will vibrate at a fundamental frequency (as well as a harmonic series). Take the strings off a steel string acoustic guitar and tap the top or side. Listen for the sound of the guitar. It has a fundamental vibrational frequency just like the shell of a kick drum. Put the strings back on the guitar and the fundamental tones of each string and their harmonics create a complex array of tones just like a kick drum. When a note that's played on the guitar plays at the same frequency of the fundamental of the guitar it produces what some guitar players call a "wolf note" just like a kick drum might produce if both skins are tuned to the fundamental frequency of the shell.

I'll repeat it again "everything that has physical MASS, when struck, can and will vibrate at a fundamental frequency (this is a very complex topic on it's own and we could write about this alone for hours). An electronic device producing white or pink noise is not producing it through physically tapping something of mass to hear its tone. So this is a straw man argument and I think you knew this.

Here's some links of what I'm talking about:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zczJXSxnw

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla%27s_oscillator

Last edited by voodoo4u; 19th May 2019 at 04:21 PM..
Old 19th May 2019
  #41
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the lowest frequency a drum can produce is defined by the diameter and the materials used to build the drum, then the tuning; it's not the depth of the drum or the thickness of the drumhead - thicker heads dampen some of the overtones though so one can hear the lower tones more easily; same when using a soft beater.

it's quite easy to tune the drumhead(s) to get a specific note but it's impossible not to have a note: one can only accentuate or attenuate the fundamental or the overtones so the one or the other gets hard to hear.

(different story with cymbals: what we think is the fundamental is actually the first overtone...)
Old 19th May 2019
  #42
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by voodoo4u View Post
I'll repeat it again "everything that has physical MASS, when struck, can and will vibrate at a fundamental frequency
That "fundamental" frequency will almost never be perceived as the 'main' frequency or 'tuned' pitch of the instrument. Unless the drummer goes around recording his empty shells and then striving mightily to reproduce that tone with his tensioning of the heads. Which many drummers never do.

The mass and the resonant cavities are minor contributors to what the listener will call "pitch". Pitch perception comes almost entirely from the Exciter. Heads, strings etc. Certainly the exciter can totally overwhelm the resonance of the wooden body. This ought to be obvious.

Tune your guitar to an open "D" chord. As many guitarists routinely do. Do it 'not work'? Do people say "no that's in disagreement with the mass of the guitar's wooden body"? Of course not, they go with the Exciter - the strings. Pick any three unstrung wooden guitars and hit them with a mallet. In all likelihood you will get 3 different tones. Are those guitars restricted to playing a single certain chord? They may sound a bit different, but if your guitar body 'resonates' at C#, and you play a "G" chord, what do you think people will hear?

Now put 1000 strings on your guitar and tune them all to different notes - the equivalent of all the interactions of all the lugs on both heads. Give it a big simultaneous whack. What do you get? Chaos.

To have a 'pitch', the waveform must repeat. When enough factors are contributing contradictory impulses (Super easy to arrive at with a drum head that has 6-10 tensioning lugs - times two heads), the resulting waveform will be largely chaotic. In there somewhere will be your precious mass-based 'fundamental'. Good luck finding it, much less getting anybody to agree that 'now' your drum is "in tune".

Bernard Purdie is not the only drummer taking care not to tune his heads to some 'note' on the scale. The waveform from a drum that is not trying to be tuned to a note is chaotic. Like a starter pistol. One reason that starter pistols are so often used as exciters for creating impulse responses for convolution purposes.
Old 19th May 2019
  #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post

it's quite easy to tune the drumhead(s) to get a specific note but it's impossible not to have a note:
By tuning the heads differently from each other, differently from the shell and even differently from one lug to the other, it is not only possible, but actually easy to have more than one note. It is in fact, possible to have hundreds. Once you have 3 or more, it can be that no one tone may have the "majority" and the "pitch" of the drum can literally be up for grabs.

What "note" is the snare drum in this youtube video
(The video shows a popular snare drum tuning method that deliberately mis-tensions the lugs.)

I am frankly surprised at the almost Religious tenacity by which people seem to be rejecting the very existence of inharmonicity. God made all sounds with a pitch? Is that what people think?
Old 19th May 2019
  #44
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voodoo4u's Avatar
OK Joeq. Now you're just going to ridiculous extremes to prove your point. Inharmonicity exists. We get it. It's a result of complex elements I've already mentioned that you seem to be ignoring or misunderstanding.

We seem to be going down the path of semantics and poorly defined terms as well as not fully acknowledging the physics involved. Let's not confuse resonance and pitch. Fundamental frequency does not always equal pitch. Something can resonate at a fundamental frequency and not be within the audible frequency range, so it wouldn't necessarily have "pitch" ie. the bridge example.

The shell of the kick drum will have a resonant frequency, but the resonance might decay so quickly that it becomes secondary to the sound of the drum and the vibrations caused by the skins may decay more slowly and become the thing that maters most in the sound of the drum, I acknowledge that. But if the goal is to understand why a kick drum does what it does, let's not ignore part of what's actually going on just to bolster your argument. And of course three guitars with their strings removed are all going to have a different fundamental frequency when you tap them. They all have a slightly different mass.

"Tune your guitar to an open "D" chord. As many guitarists routinely do. Do it 'not work'? Do people say "no that's in disagreement with the mass of the guitar's wooden body"? Of course not, they go with the Exciter - the strings. Pick any three unstrung wooden guitars and hit them with a mallet. In all likelihood you will get 3 different tones. Are those guitars restricted to playing a single certain chord? They may sound a bit different, but if your guitar body 'resonates' at C#, and you play a "G" chord, what do you think people will hear?"

This whole paragraph is a head scratcher. What are you talking about? Just because something has a fundamental frequency doesn't mean it won't sound other frequencies. And the exciter on a guitar is not the string, it's the soundboard (that excites the air molecules). The string is the source of sustained vibration, but it's not the exciter.

"Now put 1000 strings on your guitar and tune them all to different notes - the equivalent of all the interactions of all the lugs on both heads. Give it a big simultaneous whack. What do you get? Chaos."

There's no chaos. We may perceive it as chaotic because our minds can't discern all the pitches simultaneously, but there's nothing random about it. It just follows the orderly laws of physics.
The more I read some of your comments, the more I think you're confusing some of the things at play here. Resonance, pitch, sustain, tension, mass they're all different and they all play different roles in the sound of a drum. Don't mix them up in your need to be right about this, it just confuses people to are trying to learn about what's really going on with this instrument.
Old 19th May 2019
  #45
Gear Maniac
 

I totally respect your position, JoeEQ. I also acknowledge this likely the mainstream view esp. concerning pop music where the drums aren’t supposed to step on the talent. I personally can’t enjoy the sound of a drum that is not in tune. It’s a problem I have, sure, but I like it.

Getting back to the OP, who asked about pitching the bass drum to the chord progression, I say give it a spin and find out what happens. Not completely dissimilar from the accomplished drummer who can coax 3 different tones from the kick utilizing open beater, semi-closed, and buried beater.
Old 19th May 2019
  #46
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I have a classic set of DW drums. They have pitches stamped insides. When you use specific DW drum heads, you tune both the top and bottom head to that pitch. the "Set" is designed with a set of ptiches so that they both sound right and have the fewest sympithetic vibrations. Do I use that? kind of. I tune the top tome higher and the low tom lower than the stamped pitch because I like that sound better.

I recently matched up my symbal pitches. Took tons of shopping and comparison with existing cymbals. After going through about 1,200, I found a set of 7 that work decent with each other. I was only 90% satisfied. Thought I could do better because I ended up with the hats and ride on exactly the same pitch. I did handycap myself by starting with my hats and forcing everything else to match the high hats. With the hats and ride the same pitch, the intervals to the crashes worked the same from either. was the simplest but I dont think best way to setup cymbal pitches.
Old 19th May 2019
  #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
By tuning the heads differently from each other, differently from the shell and even differently from one lug to the other, it is not only possible, but actually easy to have more than one note. It is in fact, possible to have hundreds. Once you have 3 or more, it can be that no one tone may have the "majority" and the "pitch" of the drum can literally be up for grabs.

What "note" is the snare drum in this youtube video
(The video shows a popular snare drum tuning method that deliberately mis-tensions the lugs.)

I am frankly surprised at the almost Religious tenacity by which people seem to be rejecting the very existence of inharmonicity. God made all sounds with a pitch? Is that what people think?
depending on tuning, how and where one hits a drum, there can be several 'notes' - the thing is though that we tend to gravitate towards the fundamental as a reference for pitch...
Old 19th May 2019
  #48
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I don't give two f%^ks whether it's considered to be fundamental frequency or not.

For "Rock" kiks, you're goddamn right I tune them (And the rest of the kit too)

There are a group of frequencies going on when the beater hits the head, frequencies with different volume and pitch envelopes,

I want that "groups" dominant cluster to be well out of the way of the bass (Which I also tune BTW....I wonder how many people won't know that was a joke?)

Depending on what you want your song to sound like, pending a GOOD ARRANGEMENT (Look into this...it's right up there with tuning the bass) I want the frequency spectrum covered in the way I envision it being covered, I don't just say "Oh well" if the source instruments aren't playing nice.

I will also tune guitars (And basses) to whatever weird tunning allows me to get the sound I want (For instance: If the guitar is hanging on a C# maj and it sounds better open, with no notes fretted)

There's a "verticle" aspect to the sound stage that has been known to be important once in a blue moon, torturing something with EQ to get it to where it SHOULD have been recorded, is going to sound like ass. (And won't work anyway)

Tunning is there to serve YOU not the other way around.

To answer the original question: It depends on the arrangement and where the kik fits into it,
Old 20th May 2019
  #49
Gear Maniac
 

Love this thread. Looks like the op disappeared, but am appreciating this discussion, hope it doesn’t get derailed ... It’s possible there are two types of humans; those that hear drums as tonal instruments and those that hear them as ... otherwise? I can’t describe otherwise because I’m a drummer. When I play my drums I hear melodies, they just show up. If I’m working out parts for a song the drums are tuned to support the arrangement both rhythmically and melodically. There is a fair amount of drumcentric music out there these days but it’s not pop.
Old 20th May 2019
  #50
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Weird. Just looked at my previous post #45 . I typed the word progression and somehow it was highlighted to advertise some software bs I know nothing about. WTF? That’s just wrong. Didn’t come here to endorse or advertise for anyone but YT.
Old 20th May 2019
  #51
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voodoo4u's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabbo View Post
Love this thread. Looks like the op disappeared, but am appreciating this discussion, hope it doesn’t get derailed ...
Ha! It went off the rails long ago and I'm probably one of the ones, if not the one that took it there. For that I apologize. The OP just wanted to know what pitch to tune his electronic kick to and I went on about the physics of materials and their vibrational properties. I hope the OP feels he eventually got his answer.

In other posts, I'll try to curb my enthusiasm, stay on topic and be less of a d/ck about it. Sorry Joeq.
Old 20th May 2019
  #52
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Murky Waters's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabbo View Post
Love this thread. Looks like the op disappeared, but am appreciating this discussion, hope it doesn’t get derailed ... It’s possible there are two types of humans; those that hear drums as tonal instruments and those that hear them as ... otherwise? I can’t describe otherwise because I’m a drummer. When I play my drums I hear melodies, they just show up. If I’m working out parts for a song the drums are tuned to support the arrangement both rhythmically and melodically. There is a fair amount of drumcentric music out there these days but it’s not pop.
I'm with you on this, and it is not as complicated as this thread may indicate, no offense to anyone. I hear the tones too, in fact I hunt for them, particularly when I know that an EQ is coming in at some point. Boom, bawm, bim, bam....
Old 20th May 2019
  #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murky Waters View Post
I'm with you on this, and it is not as complicated as this thread may indicate, no offense to anyone. I hear the tones too, in fact I hunt for them, particularly when I know that an EQ is coming in at some point. Boom, bawm, bim, bam....
I love that... you hear the tones in fact hunt for them.. I can’t hit the kit without eventually reaching for the tuning key to make an adjustment. Once everyting is right it’s like hyperspace.
Old 20th May 2019
  #54
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Moonwhistle's Avatar
 

I used to try tuning snare & toms to notes but now it's just for tension/sweet spot of the drum and I try to get the 4th between the high and floor tom.

It's always hilarious to look at youtube tuning videos and they all contradict each other with their methods... Star shape, circular, press on the head and dial out the wrinkles, tune to a note, buy this device, one simple tuning trick... too confusing.
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