The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
I'm a terrible drummer but can't stop thinking about learning! What should I go for? Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 8th February 2018
  #31
Lives for gear
 
foamboy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonMusic View Post
My first drum kit circa 1977 was some ice cream and peanut butter plastic pails...


Mine was actually several KFC buckets and those cardboard dowels you get on those hangars from the dry cleaners.

Man, I was a BAD A$$ !

fb
Old 8th February 2018
  #32
Lives for gear
 
foamboy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post

I gave drum lessons for years, decades actually. I saw a lot of students whose parents really did not want their kid to play the drums. So they made this 'deal' - the kid gets a pad and a pair of sticks and IF the kid stays with it, a drum set will come "in the future".

Well, the kid is excited to play The Drums. A pad and a pair of sticks is not "the drums". It's like getting someone an electric guitar with no pickups on it. It's not my place to tell these people how to parent their kids, but I think it sucks. In my book, if you don't want to allow your child to play the drums, just say no. Don't play this BS game. Those kids almost always quit lessons after a year. The kids who got a drum set from the beginning had a much higher 'retention' rate.


Yep, that was my same experience as a teacher. It was really sad because some of these kids really had natural talent and who knows where they could have gone. The fact of the matter was that this was in the late 1980's to mid 90's when there were tons of cheap chinese drumkits being made and parents could have bought the kid that wanted to play drums a set for only a few more bucks than the kid that wanted an electric guitar and amp. I would see so many guitar playing siblings being encouraged and getting cool gear because parents believed it was cheaper than a drumkit, because somewhere along the way they were told that cheap drums aren't worth the investment.

Yeah, I get the volume issue but I had so many students that were even willing to play with those crappy cut out mute pads on the kit just to be able to learn " correctly". I was so lucky to have the parents I had. Because of their belief in me and their financial contributions, I have been able to make a decent living doing something I like for over half of my life! Lucky me.

fb
Old 8th February 2018
  #33
Gear Nut
 

Thread Starter
Thanks for sharing everyone :-). If course I too have been playing around with plastic cups and buckets but never got to the point I wanted to develop that skill into a hobby or profession ;-).

And worth mentioning as I saw someone mention it.
I'm not after playing drums professionally or even becoming really good at it though I wouldn't mind if that happened.

I just feel that I've underestimate what drumming actually is and hope to develop some skill of it mostly to not have to put drum machines or use ez drummer and such for my productions.
The easiest way to avoid that would of course be to get myself a drummer but how fun would that be!? Okay pretty fun but this way is far more challenging and let's me learn a new instrument!
Old 8th February 2018
  #34
Lives for gear
 
foldback's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paratriplel View Post
Thanks for sharing everyone :-). If course I too have been playing around with plastic cups and buckets but never got to the point I wanted to develop that skill into a hobby or profession ;-).

And worth mentioning as I saw someone mention it.
I'm not after playing drums professionally or even becoming really good at it though I wouldn't mind if that happened.

I just feel that I've underestimate what drumming actually is and hope to develop some skill of it mostly to not have to put drum machines or use ez drummer and such for my productions.
The easiest way to avoid that would of course be to get myself a drummer but how fun would that be!? Okay pretty fun but this way is far more challenging and let's me learn a new instrument!
I totally understand where you're coming from and I cast my vote for find a teacher who gets you playing right.

I felt I could never play drums, I owned studio kits for 40+ years but I really sucked playing them, total spaz. Then in 2012 I lost my eyesight, could not drive or read, it really sucked. I could barely see out of my left eye. I found a drum teacher who came to my house once a week, he got me playing the first day. After a couple of weeks I was jamming with CD's. I started with a Pintech kick pad I bought off eBay for $90 and a pair of Pintech mesh head pads I bought on close out at Guitar Center. I plugged these into an old Alesis D4 for sounds.

I learned that I can't stand electronic hi-hats, I've got a Yamaha hi-hat with a vintage set of Zildjian Quick Beat on it. I had a live mic in my drum practice room so I could hear the hi hat.

Soon I lusted for a real kit and after looking I decided on DW, I bought one piece at a time.

In 2015 I finally got my eye surgery and now have better than 20-20 again.

I still can't play drums very well, not nearly as well as the guys that I pay to play my drum set on original tunes but I love the kit, the cymbals and all the percussion toys.

If you're not on the ground floor you will need to decouple your drum floor, I crisscrossed layers of .25" birch plywood over two different densities of carpet beneath them. When you're putting your foot into that kick drum pedal, you're releasing a fair amount of energy whether it's hitting a head or a dead pad.

I invested in a DW5000 kick pedal early on but I found it's too fast for me, I have since been using a cheapie Tama pedal from Goodwill ($12 like new). I also have a PDP double bass pedal setup, it was only $70 on sale, all our studio drummers use it and nobody complains.

A real human playing drums, beats software by miles in my experience. One of my drummers can do in 40-minutes what would take me two weeks to accomplish in drum software. I still have my Pintech pads, two D4, another newer Alesis drum sound box, several samplers and romplers of drum sounds but they're barely used compared to the real kit.

Here's a look at what my little drum experiment has turned into: Proworkshop Gear: DRUMS

If you want to play drums I'd say DO IT!

Good luck and good music to all!

Last edited by foldback; 8th February 2018 at 01:29 PM..
Old 8th February 2018
  #35
Lives for gear
 
didlisquat's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paratriplel View Post
Thanks for sharing everyone :-). If course I too have been playing around with plastic cups and buckets but never got to the point I wanted to develop that skill into a hobby or profession ;-).

And worth mentioning as I saw someone mention it.
I'm not after playing drums professionally or even becoming really good at it though I wouldn't mind if that happened.

I just feel that I've underestimate what drumming actually is and hope to develop some skill of it mostly to not have to put drum machines or use ez drummer and such for my productions.
The easiest way to avoid that would of course be to get myself a drummer but how fun would that be!? Okay pretty fun but this way is far more challenging and let's me learn a new instrument!
I am a pretty bad drummer, but every once in a while I come away from them feeling like I had a pretty good session. I may not be too good, but I have two kits and will likely be getting a third sometime soon. They are my favorite instrument to play. I go to them more than any other.
Old 8th February 2018
  #36
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paratriplel View Post
The easiest way to avoid that would of course be to get myself a drummer but how fun would that be!? Okay pretty fun.
From the time music was invented until just about 60 years ago, music was something that involved multiple human beings playing music together. That's a run of some 200,000 years vs just the last few decades when technology has made the "Stevie Wonder" thing possible.

There is artistic satisfaction in both, but IMO, for sheer fun, playing music with other human beings blows away playing on top of previous versions of yourself.

Not saying you shouldn't learn the drums. Maybe you should 'be a drummer' and find someone to play bass with you. Just don't rule out aspiring to play in a band, merely because it doesn't look like there is the prospect right now. And if you do aspire to be a 'professional' (at any instrument) some day, sooner or later, you will have to perform live. At that point, your ability to play with other human beings will be the measurement of your professionalism.
Old 8th February 2018
  #37
Lives for gear
Get a drumeo practice pad and the Pro Metronome app. Hit it all the time — especially while you’re watching tv or listening to music. We’re talking OCD-level all the time.

Pro metronome is amazing for its gradual speed increase feature. Keep pushing it and watch your BPMs increase. Concentrate on clean strokes and even spacing between them.

Watch every YouTube video you can on rudiments. Every time you watch a video, spend several hours trying to learn the skill.

For equipment I use a Roland v-kit upgraded with an atv AD5 and atv snare. The latter two are the best musical purchases I’ve made in years. And I’ve made way too many.

And a Nord drum 3p. It’s awesome.
Old 9th February 2018
  #38
Gear Nut
 

Thread Starter
Don't get me wrong I love playing with other human beings but I've learned that for writing music it is good to be able to play the instruments that is important for the song and that at least for me it doesn't always work out that well working with others at least not on a regular basis.
The drummers I know are into other type/genres of music than myself which often means a too big of a compromise for either them or for myself to continue playing together on the level I'm interested in.
Which means that I get bored playing music that isn't inspiring to me or vice versa.

So my hopes is that I'll be able to learn playing drums and that it will somehow magically help me finish my songs ;-).

No but seriously that's what got me interested in drums the last couple of months.
I really hope my music will benefit from learning drums but I'm fairly sure that I will continue having synth and guitar as my main instruments.
When it comes to playing live I will let someone else play drums, same will probably go for recordings that needs something more advanced than I'm able to play myself but just to be able to actually explai, in words or similar, what type if beat I'm after will be such a big improvement!

That's my thoughts right now, maybe a couple of months in I've changed my view completely.

I'm not sure what kit to be looking out for or to purchase new yet. I tried a fantastic kit out in a music store, problem was that it was $4 500 and it's not often that they got the cheaper electronic kits up and ready to try out.

The drum teacher recommended to look for a second hand Roland TD4 kit but said that most kits that had a different type of pad for hihat and toms should be alright but i'm still pretty confused about what to get.

Practice pad seems like a useful investment but if I know myself it can go both ways. If I spend $80+ in a practice pad that is not able to okay sounds I can either set up goals to achieve and är award myself with buying a kit when I've earned it but I could just as easy get bored with it and put it in my wardrobe being bitter about learning drums and it won't have anything to do with me being too lazy to practice or not good enough but just be about myself not following my instinct and getting the real deal at first and then when I feel the need getting a practice pad to practice on.

If you were starting today and was going to buy a electronic kit and getting into drums (as main instrument or not);
Which kit would you choose?

The scenario being that you were spending a maximum of $1000 on the kit including sticks, chair etc and you knew that you won't be able to spend more than those $1000 for at least the upcoming year.
Old 10th February 2018
  #39
Gear Guru
 

I helped the conservatory buy their Alesis kit back when, but it's been many years since I looked at the electronic drum market. I have no idea what's out there.

I will just say you should only consider kits that have real pedals that actually hit things. I have seen some units with 'built-in' pedals that are really just spring-loaded switches - and they are just awful. I think another consideration is the feel and size of the pads. Drum pads are rarely as large as a real drum, but stay away from the really tiny 'cookie' sized ones.

if you are getting a pad kit, you don't need a 'practice pad'. Just shut off the drum brain and all the pads on your kit are 'practice pads'.
Old 10th February 2018
  #40
Lives for gear
 
vernier's Avatar
I found it impossible to learn using an electronic kit, but hopefully you'll have better luck.
Old 10th February 2018
  #41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paratriplel View Post
...So my hopes is that I'll be able to learn playing drums and that it will somehow magically help me finish my songs ;-).
....
I really hope my music will benefit from learning drums but I'm fairly sure that I will continue having synth and guitar as my main instruments.
When it comes to playing live I will let someone else play drums, same will probably go for recordings that needs something more advanced...

I'm gonna go out a limb here and suggest you not bother...Unless the drums are REALLY calling you. Get a good drum program ( Addictive Drums, etc.) and become a really good drum programmer. You could get a multipad (Roland, Yamaha, KAT) with some pedals to pound out something if desired.
You play synth, so it makes perfect sense. Between the guitar and synth (vocals?) you've got your hands full. Drums are HARD. Yes anyone can hit them, not like violin or trumpet where it takes a year just to a decent tone, but many say drums are the hardest instrument. The time you spend learning is time not spent on your main instruments.

Anecdotal story: I started drums at 9, guitar at 14, and had learn piano for a music degree in college. Drums were always my main instrument though. Played in some semi-successful bands through my 20s. When the kids came by the time I was 30, the (ex)wife said it's time get off the road and grow up. I thought, no problem, I'll do solo stuff where I play all the instruments. I wasted ten years by myself in the studio trying to be Stevie Wonder/Prince, whatever. First, I learned collaborating with others is way better than working alone (even though I'm a total introvert). I also learned that I'm not really a guitar player, or a bass player, or a keyboardist, or a singer. Yea, I can do them, but I really wish I'd spent more of that time further developing my main instrument. YMMV
Old 10th February 2018
  #42
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
I helped the conservatory buy their Alesis kit back when, but it's been many years since I looked at the electronic drum market. I have no idea what's out there.
There are so many choices out there that it's crazy compared to 15-20 years ago. Unfortunately, the ones worth having cost a significant amount of coin, so a used kit would be best, IMO. I sold off a Roland hybrid kit (TD-8 plus a few extras) for $1,100 a few years ago. I'm sure the OP could find something now for less.
Old 11th February 2018
  #43
Deleted User
Guest
find a place where you can play acoustic drums. e-druming is like playing guitar on a keyboard !
Old 12th February 2018
  #44
Gear Nut
 

Thread Starter
Thanks for your replies, sorry I haven't been as active, lots of stuff going on in my life right now.

Not to bother to start drumming is not an option. I don't mind finding out its not for me and after that letting go of my plans but it's really hard to express how I feel about drums...
I always liked drumming and I'm almost always doing it (playing with my hands on myself, others and things), I understand this is not similar to real drumming I'm just trying to express who I am and why I want to learn drumming but I get a feeling people either believe that you want to become a pro and legendary drummer or that it's the idea of drums being really easy to learn and that it won't demand any effort to learn.

I'm just aiming for something in between. It feels a bit weird to say it but I'm a really good guitar player and I'm not terrible at keyboard / synth. I understand I'll have to put in time to learn and become any good but that's why I think I'll be good at, since I have a fairly visible goal, and will be able to compare my own drumming towards what I can accomplish with drum programming or programs like ezdrummer I will not if I'm moving in the right direction. I don't want to do this in drum lessons for 10 years, but just get a good start and technic and develop from there, I never took any guitar or keyboard lessons and I know that my playing would have been a lot different if I had and even though I've noticed that it sometimes would have benefited me I don't regret it, because this was my way of learning and it's what I have felt works best for me.

So maybe for my level or commitment which is still very vague I'd do with a drum pad and some good pedals but I feel that since I'll focus mostly on kick, hihat and snare I might benefit more from a kit.

Still want to know what you guys think I should look for and what price I should pay for it.

TD-8 is one "suggestion" anyone more for it? Something else?
Old 12th February 2018
  #45
Lives for gear
 
Moonwhistle's Avatar
 

Real drums and lessons. Spend any money you planned on putting into this straight into lessons and learn on a real kit from a real drummer.
Old 12th February 2018
  #46
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonwhistle View Post
Real drums and lessons. Spend any money you planned on putting into this straight into lessons and learn on a real kit from a real drummer.
njet - 'fun'/joy is the key!

if space/noise/costs are issues, get any drumpad with 2 pedals attached (or any 'module and add a pad as a snare) - play along music, watch drummers and communicate/interact/play with others!

(of course there's a lot to learn from teachers and the sensation of an acoustic drum set, but there are many more options to get you started!)
Old 12th February 2018
  #47
Deleted User
Guest
buy used, by roland, with alittle luck you find a td-4k (all meshheads expect the kick) for around 500€. I strongly suggest to learn on an acoustic drum, but you can resell the e-drum kit easily if the first enthusiasm is gone.
Old 12th February 2018
  #48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paratriplel View Post
Thanks for your replies, sorry I haven't been as active, lots of stuff going on in my life right now.

Not to bother to start drumming is not an option. I don't mind finding out its not for me and after that letting go of my plans but it's really hard to express how I feel about drums...
I always liked drumming and I'm almost always doing it (playing with my hands on myself, others and things), I understand this is not similar to real drumming....
Then do it. They are calling you.

Don't let a jaded middle aged bastage tell you otherwise
Old 12th February 2018
  #49
Gear Nut
 

Thread Starter
A real acoustic kit isn't an option and I'm a bit surprised people recommend lessons before actually spending time playing. I'm not after becoming sensational I said. I want to learn basics from a drum teacher so I start the right way but I'm not the type or person that learns from anything else than by doing it myself and making discoveries from mistakes, if that makes any sense..

I'll buy a electronic kit or multi pad (with pedals) and I will take lessons and got some drummer friends to ask for help with basic questions if needed but I'm not aiming towards becoming amazing, I just want to learn drumming and if that means a couple variations of tight drum beats so be it.

I do understand that learning the basic technics is essential to not become a more terrible drummer and I'll invest in lessons for that but I'm not after much more than what I mentioned above right now and I feel I might not have been clear enough about my ambitions aren't super high though I don't mind becoming good and me as a person will not get that ambition until I play the kit and have great fun.
Living in the city it's not possible to get a place to play acoustic drums without spending more than I'm willing right now.. In the future I might get a place with some friends and rent it for a music room / smaller studio / creative room. But I'm talking now!

I'll check out the TD-4K and see if u can find any used ones cheap or such! Though I don't see it having all mesh heads? Or maybe I've misunderstood what mesh heads looks like?
Old 12th February 2018
  #50
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paratriplel View Post
A real acoustic kit isn't an option and I'm a bit surprised people recommend lessons before actually spending time playing.
You should not be surprised. And look at who the "people" are who are saying this - professional musicians and teachers. I don't even understand what you mean by "spending time playing". Spending time playing what? Flailing around like a toddler? At least some of your 'time' spent playing should be practicing the things you learn in the lesson. Without the lesson, you won't be practicing at all, just messing around.

Quote:
my ambitions aren't super high
It's not about how 'modest' your goals are. Whatever your goals, the time to take lessons is still at the beginning. This is just as true for people who only want to mess around for fun as it is for people whose goal is to become great professional drummers.

If you realize down the line that you are not that serious, and you want to drop out of lessons after a few months, go ahead, but trying to do it the other way around is pointless. At least you will learn some reading, some rudiments, how to correctly hold the sticks and some pedal techniques - things that can keep you going if you want to go it alone.

Even if your "main goal" is just to have a little fun, playing real beats that actually sound like something is a lot more fun than just making some random noise with the sticks.
Old 13th February 2018
  #51
Gear Nut
 

Thread Starter
But I've already said I've contacted a drum teacher about lessons and I don't understand the point of spending the money I planed on spending on a kit on lessons, that's exactly what I'm not after (being a situation where I can't play drums to some tracks and before that practice on drums at home when I've got time for it.

I know for a fact that I won't have interested in drumming if I don't have something to play on when I'm inspired to do so.

I know myself to well to believe it would work for me and if that will make me a lousy drummer I guess it's not meant for me, but I'm trying to be pro active and make the best of the situation. Because no matter what is recommended I need something to play at home at, will take lessons but won't spend "gear money" om lessons before I've got a kit.

Please have some understanding that not everyone is born with a normal brain and that diagnosed people might not be able to do what normal people do.
Old 13th February 2018
  #52
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paratriplel View Post
But I've already said I've contacted a drum teacher about lessons and I don't understand the point of spending the money I planed on spending on a kit on lessons....will take lessons but won't spend "gear money" om lessons before I've got a kit.
I am not the one who said to spend "all" your gear money on a kit. And while I can't speak for anyone else, I doubt that is what was the intended idea.

Obviously you need something to practice on, and as I said earlier, if it isn't fun, if it isn't music, the student is not going to stay with it.

Quote:
I know for a fact that I won't have interested in drumming if I don't have something to play on when I'm inspired to do so.
I totally agree. I think this is true for just about everybody. When I worked for the Conservatory, I pretty much had to teach whoever came in. Today, I won't even take a student unless he or she owns a full drum set. Not a "practice pad and a pair of sticks". Not a "lonely snare drum". I teach the drum set.

But at the same time, I detect a strong hint of the intention to just "mess around" and you thinking it's OK to put off lessons until "later" - after you get good? That doesn't make any sense either.

Surely you can take some of your money and buy an affordable kit - and lessons only require X amount of money per week so it's not like you need all the cash up front. In the past, I have made arrangements with financially strapped students to schedule a lesson every other week.

I do feel that the "schedule" part is very important though. People who try to just do ad hoc lessons on an 'as needed' basis always end up dropping out very quickly.

A big part of taking lessons is putting some discipline into your learning. Even if you say you don't have a goal to be "the greatest", the fact is you won't make any progress without discipline. Having a regular lesson 'coming up' is important to focus your practice routine. I know a tiny handful of people who have the intense self-discipline to push themselves without a schedule, but from reading your posts, I am pretty sure you aren't in that category.
Old 13th February 2018
  #53
Gear Nut
 

Thread Starter
Sounds a lot like the conversation I had with my friend. Haha.

I'm sincere about taking lessons since I understand that just holding the sticks wrong could teach some bad habits. I just mean it's frustrating to feel people still focusing on spending money on lessons when I've already acknowledge that bit. At first I thought okay I'll take a couple of lessons (4-5) but I tjej understood that it is probably needed to take at least the double amount of lessons to actually learn the very basic art of drumming and I promise I'll be motivated to do so if I got the time and money for it and if it is for me.

Right now I would like some recommendations on a kit to buy when I start my lessons and move to a place where I got the space for it (1 month). I just can't invest in lessons to become a great drummer and not have a kit because if I can't practice what I learn I'll get bored with it (and I promise I'm not the only one that would be).
and I won't lie I'll mess around a couple of hours because that is what motivates me to become better at something.

My plan is to take a couple of lessons maybe 3 the first week and after that maybe one every second week or so due to my understanding of how much time I'll have and what's possible.

If I start 'm lessons now I'll get bored before I get a drum kit, if I start my lessons after I'm "familiar" with the kit and playing drums I'll have to unlearn all the messing around I've learned. I understand both those scenarios.

You're totally right that I need something that disciplines me and I know this (not something I'm proud of, just the way things is) and I'm going to give this a shoot but I just want to make people understand it won't work for me to do it the right way.. I need something to practice on and so be it if it's only to practice what I've just learnt the lessons before.

I don't have high expectations on myself and again my plan is not to become one of the best drummers I just would like to be able to okay drums. I understand it means dedication, lessons and time.

Just don't want to but all the money on one horse (lessons) and end up with nothing since I know it won't work for me. But I'm listening to your advice and will take lessons to learn the basics of drumming and decide from there if it's for me.
Old 14th February 2018
  #54
Lives for gear
 

the importance of drum lessons...

i was an international artist relation manager for a manufacturer of musical instruments and got to see/hear/talk/play with most any drummer you can think of who was on the international touring circuit in the nineties, covering all musical areas, from punk to classic, from african to asian music, free jazz to speed metal. i went to rehearsals, show, concerts, recording session with prototypes of instruments, listend and talked to the drummers, their drum techs, other musicians, sound engineers, managers, their wifes, children and cats etc.

now what? of course many highly regarded individuals/musicians/drummers (such as bill bruford, chad wackerman, will kennedy, cindy blackman and a few others) had (and/or became) great teachers - however, there were some individuals i came across who never sat down to practice and never ever had any single drum lesson, yet they played some of the most amazing music i ever got a chance to hear!

so it's okay to get drum lessons and most likely, you'll learn a few things, but IT MAY BE that you'll get your ideas from somewhere else and don't need the technique to execute the most difficult odd time polyrhythmic intercultural drumloop single hand shuffle...

p.s. don't practice with machines, play with humans!

Last edited by deedeeyeah; 14th February 2018 at 03:37 AM.. Reason: p.s. added
Old 14th February 2018
  #55
Lives for gear
 

If noise is a problem, get a small practice pad and take it to the park and practice. I do it all the time in the summer when there is no snow. Always practice with a metronome. That way you will develop good timing. Buy some drumming books with exercises. Play along with the radio once you get your chops down. Again, a metronome is very important. I prefer the old mechanical windup ones.
Old 14th February 2018
  #56
Lives for gear
If you can, real drums are cheaper than electronic drums and better to learn on.

Start with just a single practice pad or snare drum.

The feet are important, I have lots of cash tied up in pedals from Trick drums.

If you start getting into trigger, realize most of the time you will be listening to sound directly out of the drum brain to minimize lag. You will want to pick either Yamaha, Roland, Or Alternatemode-Kat as the core of the setup.

The hard part of triggers & drum brains are the hats, Chokes on rides, Position sensing on the ride or snare. Those things are all done with tricks and are brand specific.

The cheapest thing is to Make your own kit and say buy a MAGAdrum brain. Good bang/buck.

Check out V-Drums.com, better forum for that info.

Using a Soft synth for drums is another matter. Ok for mixing after you have captured MIDI, but if you want real time say BDF3, you better have a sound card that provides under 2ms round trip Audio and MIDI. Not cheap.



Now to drum lesson one. R, L, R, L (right left right left)....IE a roll. But here is the trick, can you play it at any tempo at 16 distinct volumes?

After you hit the drum (or kick), the stick should stop 1" away from the drum. Then you are ready for the next action ASAP, and learn speed rather than playing in continually moving circles. Each has there place, but circles slows you down in the long run.
Old 14th February 2018
  #57
Gear Nut
 

Thread Starter
A real kit is not an option at this time. I want to be able to practice at home and surely I could get a practice pad for that but I still won't have anywhere to play an acoustic kit and even though this is wrong (I know) most important for me is to be able to play drums not to learn drums.

Doesn't mean I just want to mess around just that I for now and a year from now won't have the option to get an acoustic kit, in the future I might get some studio room / rehearsal room with some friends, by then I could consider getting an acoustic kit.

I appreciate everyone's opinion here, really, this thread got a lot bigger and popular than I expected! I also take it everything that's being mentioned.

But the situation right now is that I want to be able to play drums at home. Might take 5 lessons or 20 lessons, right now I don't know because no matter how important lessons are I need to be realistic about myself and what I'm able to do.

If it matters I got a fast audio interface (Apollo Twin) and hope I won't have any problems with latency though the drums would probably be connected to my RME AD/DA converter if I play them from their module (considering superior drummer if I'm not happy with it's sound).

So for now I need some sort of an electronic kit and of course lessons (but it's been pointed out before so let's leave it at that for now, unless it's not new information or something like recommendation for drum lessons, OK?)

So, I'll be able to purchase an electronic drum kit in a month (due to space), but a drum/multi pad like Roland SPD-30 OR Yamaha DTX Multi 12 with a kick pedal and hihat controller pedal I could purchase right now (would probably hold off with a real kit it this happens or sell it when I've moved to my new apartment and have the space for a kit) and start with the drum lessons unless the teacher thinks differently about that.

Any advice on the purchase? Any training I'll be able to do without getting bored before I get something to practice on (theory* or practical)?

* I know some basics in drum programming already.
Old 14th February 2018
  #58
Lives for gear
 
foamboy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paratriplel View Post

Any advice on the purchase? Any training I'll be able to do without getting bored before I get something to practice on (theory* or practical)?

* I know some basics in drum programming already.
I stand by my suggestion in post #15 . For the money, the Yammie kits are a good deal, especially for a novice who may or may not stick with it...no offense.

fb
Old 14th February 2018
  #59
Gear Nut
 

Thread Starter
I understand, though I'd really like to get some specific suggestions for kits.

No offense taken! I know I might not hang on to this hobby, though I think it will become a passion of mine, the only instrument I've dropped out from us saxophone.. Totally couldn't handle that.

So any specific kits you would recommend?
Old 14th February 2018
  #60
Lives for gear
 
foamboy's Avatar
I can't really be more specific. Yamaha dtx 450. My point is that, if you stick with it, the Yamaha kits are not a bad centerpiece and IF you don't, then you're only out a few hundred bucks. Not a huge loss for an experiment.

Good luck,

fb
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump