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Making your own DSUB's (DIY)
Old 7th February 2007
  #1
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dim light's Avatar
 

Making your own DSUB's (DIY)

Hi guys!

Me and my friend would like to try to make our own dsub's to TRS balanced.

Do we need any special tools?

Any tips, links etc - how this is done. Thanks a lot!

thumbsup
Old 8th February 2007
  #2
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David-Morpheus's Avatar
 

cable, connectors, soldering iron and patience
better 4x patience

i'm doing the same right now wiring everything to a TT patchbay with dsubs on the back. i needed db25 -> db25, trs jack -> db25, xlr -> db25 ...
Old 8th February 2007
  #3
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dim light's Avatar
 

Thanks for the reply bro!

I checked one of my dsubs and it looks like they are not soldered to the dsub connector?

It looks like they are pushed inside the connector.
Old 8th February 2007
  #4
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Dave Peck's Avatar
 

Some D-Subs have solder cup terminals and require some fairly difficult soldering work. Other D-subs have contact pins or sockets that get crimped onto the ends of the wires and then pushed into the D-sub housing. These may be easier to assemble but they require special crimp tools from the connector manufacturer. Probably not worth it unless you are making a lot of them.

I'm not sure I would pick this project as a DIY to try to save money.

DP
Old 8th February 2007
  #5
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numrologst's Avatar
definately don't do it unless you are used to it... A few weeks ago i spent 10 hours trying to make dsubs... And after the frustration, i only got through 4 of them, and only could keep 1 of them because i did such a bad job... I am pretty good with the iron too.

I just eneded up buying some digidesign dsubs... As they were better than the hosa and they were a little less than the pro co.

What i did though is buy 4 -- three footers and cut them in half... So i had 8 dsub connectors... THen i took some 8 channel redco snake cable and connected that to the bare ends of the cut in half dsub... Then cut the redco snake to length and put xlr. tt, and trs on the other end.

This way you only have to buy half the dsubs, and like 100-150 feet of redco cable...

Ended up costing less than buying 8 15ft db25 to xlr...etc.

Try that
Old 8th February 2007
  #6
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David-Morpheus's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by numrologst View Post
What i did though is buy 4 -- three footers and cut them in half... So i had 8 dsub connectors... THen i took some 8 channel redco snake cable and connected that to the bare ends of the cut in half dsub... Then cut the redco snake to length and put xlr. tt, and trs on the other end.
this is someting similar I did just in reverse. I had TRS - TRS snakes - I cut them in half and soldered the db25 on the other hand. similar with XLR snakes.

if you have basic soldering skills it should not be any problem sofar every snake I made is 100% working
Old 8th February 2007
  #7
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dim light's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by numrologst View Post
I just eneded up buying some digidesign dsubs... As they were better than the hosa and they were a little less than the pro co.

What i did though is buy 4 -- three footers and cut them in half... So i had 8 dsub connectors... THen i took some 8 channel redco snake cable and connected that to the bare ends of the cut in half dsub... Then cut the redco snake to length and put xlr. tt, and trs on the other end.

This way you only have to buy half the dsubs, and like 100-150 feet of redco cable...

Ended up costing less than buying 8 15ft db25 to xlr...etc.

Try that
Awesome tip!

Thanks a lot guys - I'm a beginner with the solder iron. I'm poor and thought it would be better go with the DIY approach.

I think numrologst approach will fit my skills.

Thanks!
Old 8th February 2007
  #8
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yeah man, in addition to only being able to use 1 db25 i made... I ran through like 20 or 30 of the actual db25 ends... I kept getting solder runs onto the metal jacket and I'd have to start over... Or i would end up soldering 2 cups together right at the end, and i couldn't get the solder out from between them...

It was bad... I would get to the end of a cable and mess it up and have to start over.
Old 8th February 2007
  #9
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WTMNMF's Avatar
 

Buy a cheap hand crimper, pins, connectors and hoods. Depending on what you are plugging into you may have to buy metric screws to mate it to the equipment.

If you want to invest a little or spend some time looking on ebay, you could get a ratcheting hand crimper which has the advantage of not allowing you to under-crimp the pin.

My favorite type is the crimper for solid cup pins, but these are more expensive, although I see them on ebay for $5-$10.

Good luck
Old 8th February 2007
  #10
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dim light's Avatar
 

You tried to DIY = respect!

Thanks bro!
Old 8th February 2007
  #11
Led
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Led's Avatar
Imperative - find an old serial port socket and superglue it onto a block of wood, then plug the dsub into it and it will hold it for you while you solder. Use the solder cup ones, and tin them with solder first till the cup fills, don't over do it.
When you strip the insulation form the wires you are soldering into the dsub cup, you only need to expose about 3 millimeters, then when you solder it into the cup the heat will make the insulation shrink back a little and you will have a really neat finish. Tin the wires first also (that means putting solder onto them and letting it set before you put them into the cup). If you can afford it get a heat controlled soldering iron and work at about 350 degrees, it is worth the extra money. The first few are the hardest and once you get the hang of it you will find it easy.

Cheers
Old 8th February 2007
  #12
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What about eye/lung protection & fans? I assume the vapors are harmful if not completely toxic.


Andre
Old 8th February 2007
  #13
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subspace's Avatar
I needed 24 i/o worth of DB25 connectors so I bought 6 of these at .89¢ a pop;

http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=090-705

http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=090-570

I soldered them to leads running from a solder at the rear patchbay and they all worked fine from the get go. Take the tinning advice above, and a Mac plus works fine for holding the DB25 in place while you work...
Old 8th February 2007
  #14
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dim light's Avatar
 

Led thanks for the instructions - awesome!

Thanks guys!
Old 8th February 2007
  #15
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Steamy Williams's Avatar
 

I don't think it's quite as hard as numrologst is making out. A D-sub was one of the very first things I ever had to solder. All it took was a little bit of patience and it worked perfectly first time. If you rush it, you're definitely likely to make mistakes. I haven't done one since, but I will have to solder a bunch of them sometime soon for a new patchbay. I'm pretty rusty with the soldering iron, but I don't think it'll be a problem.
Old 8th February 2007
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steamy Williams View Post
All it took was a little bit of patience and it worked perfectly first time.
Agreed... the first db25 (solder cups) i had to do was a pain, but i just took a LOT of time to make it clean and make sure i had the pins right (tascam pinout is easy to get backwards it seems to me). take your time with it and you'll do fine, it isn't that overly difficult.

the worst thing i had to deal with was getting the individual wires in the right place inside the hoods i had... next time i gotta try to find bigger ones.
Old 8th February 2007
  #17
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dim light's Avatar
 

Cool - thanks!
Old 8th February 2007
  #18
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max cooper's Avatar
 

I've made a bunch of D-Sub to XLR cables.

I think always use the solder-type D-Subs instead of the crimp-type ones.

I think to use wire that's not so heavy is kinda key here. Those D-Sub receptacles are pretty tiny.

Also, make sure you only strip back as much wire as you need.

Use a pretty sharp tip on your iron.

Get a female D-Sub to plug the male one into while you solder; this will help dissipate the heat from the iron.

Lemme know how it's going.
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Making your own DSUB's (DIY)-dsub.jpg  
Old 8th February 2007
  #19
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dim light's Avatar
 

Max - looks great man! Thanks a bunch for the info/feedback! I feel ready to try this soon
Old 8th February 2007
  #20
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stuntbutt's Avatar
 

1. A tiny soldering tip.

2. A magnified light.
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