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Freq.Graph lines
Old 4th February 2007
  #1
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erwinor's Avatar
 

Freq.Graph lines

Could someone explain what all these lines at the graph are?

thank you
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Freq.Graph lines-cambridge.jpg  
Old 4th February 2007
  #2
Gear Nut
 

20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100,200,300,400,500,600,700,800,900,1k,2k,3k,4k,5k,6k,7k,8k,9k,10k,20k.

As frequency is a logarithmic curve and isn't linear, it looks strange.
Old 4th February 2007
  #3
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Got a feeling our friend might need a bit more help than this.
Yiannis, how good are you with frequencies? I mean, let's say you hear a tone at 800 Hz. Do you know what the frequency of a tone an octave above that would be?
Old 4th February 2007
  #4
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erwinor's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_David View Post
As frequency is a logarithmic curve and isn't linear, it looks strange.
thats what i dont get
why it looks like that!

why the space of the lines from the 20>100 is getting narrow and then from 100>1000 wider and from 1000>10k narrow again?
Old 4th February 2007
  #5
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erwinor's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by woomanmoomin View Post
Got a feeling our friend might need a bit more help than this.
Yiannis, how good are you with frequencies? I mean, let's say you hear a tone at 800 Hz. Do you know what the frequency of a tone an octave above that would be?
yeap,1.6k
Old 4th February 2007
  #6
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woomanmoomin's Avatar
 

OK, say you hear a tone at 100 Hz (low). An octave higher than that is 200 Hz (double the original frequency). An octave higher than that is 400 Hz (double again), then 800 Hz, 1600 Hz, 3200 Hz, 6400 Hz, 12800, 25600, etc. That is, as you go higher and higher up the keys of a piano, as the tones get higher, the difference between them in the number of cycles per second increases. The graph shows them in the funny-looking, logarithmic way because otherwise the scale would just go on for ever and ever to the right, and the actual difference you could hear at that end between one tone and another represented just to the right of it on the graph would be comparatively small.

Increase the frequency of a tone of 100 Hz by 100 Hz and you get 200 Hz, which means you've raised the tone by an octave. Increase 25600 Hz by 100 Hz and you've got 25700 Hz, which means you've really not changed the tone you hear very much at all.

Hope that helps.

P.S. Wrote this after you sent your message and can see now that you will get this. Result.
Old 4th February 2007
  #7
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If I understood well,the graph just shows visually the difference that we can hear when we change freq.
From 1k-2k the space is big because the difference is an octave a can cleary be heard.
From 9k-10k the difference is less audible thats why the space is smaller.

forgive me if i understood it wrong.
Old 4th February 2007
  #8
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woomanmoomin's Avatar
 

That's basically it.
40 Hz > 80 Hz = one octave difference (only 40 Hz difference!)
10 kHz > 20 kHz = one octave difference (10 whole kHz difference!)
Old 4th February 2007
  #9
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thank you!!
i was wondering a long time now.
not any more
Old 5th February 2007
  #10


Pick up a few electronics engineering books that cover analog. These are standard Log plots.

Just like you should use with any wide-band signal.....




-tINY

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