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sssssss.... 6khz and beyond.. pain.. lot of
Old 3rd February 2007
  #1
sssssss.... 6khz and beyond.. pain.. lot of

hi guys,

mixing a project from a 80's hairband. the band is ok, vocals too (bit strange accent), but the guy who sings, did record it with lots of SSSSSSSSs.. it's a pain in the ass.. maybe wrong microphone or preamp. the overall vocalperformance is good.

I just wanted to know:

1. what to do
2. what kind of de-essing you use (hard-software)
3. how do you deal with "bad recorded" material? I am not TLC or CLA, so I can't say: "NO I DONT MIX IT":D

cheers George
Old 3rd February 2007
  #2
Lives for gear
 
RCM - Ronan's Avatar
If this stuff was tracked in the 80s there is a good chance they ran the vocal through and aural exciter.

You are in luck that this is a hard rock band. You may be able to get away with actually cutting off alot of the high end with a low pass filter. 80s metal probably has pretty bright guitars and drums so there is a chance the vocal might actually stand out in the mix a little better without the high end. If cutting off the high end of the vocal makes the vox sound bad, look at cutting high end somewhere else (probably the guitars) so that there is not so much high end build up in the over all track. a nice fat low end will make ugly high end less offensive.

Its not often I chime in with advice to use a plug in, but this is a situation where something like the Waves C4 multiband compressor might be good. set it so just the two highest bands to work.

Other people will probably have good advice about which De-esser to use.
Old 3rd February 2007
  #3
thanx a bunch!

ups,, sorry.. they just sound like an 80's hairmetalband. it was cut one month ago

ok.. I never got "warm" with this multiband-compressor stuff besides the dynamical EQ stuff from sonalksis.

hei.. you are resting on a very nice gear-setup (your avatar:D).

cheers
Old 3rd February 2007
  #4
Lives for gear
 
heathen's Avatar
 

Or you could side chain a nice analog comp, that may tame those ssssssses. Had to do this the other day and it worked very well, was a buzz essence comp I used.
Old 4th February 2007
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
mardyk's Avatar
 

Whenever I have to deal with really loud esses I always reduce the gain on them destructively by 5-8 dBs. In logic you can do it in the sample editor. Zoom in 2 clicks and the esses are very obvious. Big fat black lumps. You can get Ts and Sshh sounds too. If you're uncertain make a copy. I've gotten tracks where the sss waveforms are twice the size of the vowel sounds. Then you can use a ren de-esser or something like that.
Old 4th February 2007
  #6
Lives for gear
 
soundawg's Avatar
 

Try the Voxengo spitfish - FREE!

Works really well.

Soundawg
Old 4th February 2007
  #7
Lives for gear
 
andychamp's Avatar
The SPL de-essers don't work with a sidechain. They detect the "S" and re-inject them out of phase. Sounds less compressed and is always on the right frequency. There's a hardware version bundled with Cubase/Nuendo. Never tried the hardware version, though....
Old 4th February 2007
  #8
Gear Maniac
Hi George,
Try the Digi DeEsser III. When mixing a poorly recorded vocal I usually use 2 of these each targeting different frequencies.. Generally speaking, you can try this:
1. DeEsser (6k-8k)
2. EQ
3. Compressor
4. DeEsser. (7k-10k)

Hope that helps..
jamieboss1

Last edited by jamieboss1; 4th February 2007 at 03:46 PM.. Reason: oops! meant 6k-8k
Old 4th February 2007
  #9
Lives for gear
 
Stitch333's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamieboss1 View Post
1. DeEsser (3k-6k)

jamieboss1
3-6k? really? I never get below 7k
I really like the waves ren de-esser
Old 4th February 2007
  #10
Lives for gear
 
Protools Guy's Avatar
 

I use the Waves Ren De-Esser too. I find the harshness to start around 5k. You might want to use a spectrum analyzer to find he exact freq. that's problematic.
Old 4th February 2007
  #11
Lives for gear
 
gainreduction's Avatar
 

If you're working on a DAW:

1. Zoom in the vocal track, you can clearly see the "ss"-es
2. Cut out all the ss, t, ch -sounds and put them on their own track
3. On the dedicated ss-track, try eq-ing out some highend and lowering the volume until it sounds natural and not overly sibilant.
4. Smile
Old 4th February 2007
  #12
Lives for gear
 
Stitch333's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamieboss1 View Post
Hi George,
Try the Digi DeEsser III. When mixing a poorly recorded vocal I usually use 2 of these each targeting different frequencies.. Generally speaking, you can try this:
1. DeEsser (6k-8k)
2. EQ
3. Compressor
4. DeEsser. (7k-10k)

Hope that helps..
jamieboss1
werd
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