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Where do people get the money to build a new studio? Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 14th December 2015
  #1
Gear Addict
 
AnalogBrain's Avatar
 

Where do people get the money to build a new studio?

Hey guys,

I'm absolutely curious, and can't figure it out.

I'm not talking about the $1,000,000+ facilities where there must be investors or somebody is independently wealthy.
And I'm not talking about the guys who save up for a few years (and max out some CCs) and upgrade their project studio.

I'm talking about the middle level local studio.
I see guys here buying $five figure$ consoles, and racks of great gear and a buildout that must cost tens of thousands.How do they do it?

I almost got laughed out of my bank just for inquiring about a $30,000 "business" loan. I would have to put my house up for collateral, and that was the upper limit of personal loans they do (my credit union doesn't do business loans).

Where do these guys get these huge chunks of change to build a studio?

Dumbfounded,
-Neil
Old 14th December 2015
  #2
Lives for gear
 
redgrovesound's Avatar
There's different approaches, depending on your goal.

For me, it's been a slow and steady build over 10+ years to attain a halfway respectable home studio I can feel comfortable charging others to record in.

This requires a lot of discipline to save and buy quality products that will hold their value, and last a long time. If I'm lucky, I get 2-3 decent pieces per year.

I work a regular 8-5 and *that* is how I make my living. Engineering is something I do because I love to do it, and rather than funnel money into a fancy car, or a boat or a motorcycle, I buy gear instead.

Over a long period of time if you are disciplined finiancially, things like savings, home equity, or even a 401k can be leveraged to support larger purchases.

In addition I do a lot of DIY. I built most of my studio myself, restored and built a lot of gear. Lots of "sweat equity" in my studio.

I'll emphasize, this took me close to ten years to where I'm just beginning to feel like I have something truly competitive to offer. And I have a pretty successful career in technology that provides what I think most would consider a "middle-upper class" income. Those ten years also have given me a lot of time to develop my skills and build relationships within the music community in my area, doing a lot of free work, which is now beginning to turn into paying work.

In short, I had to self fund my studio. And that takes a *long* time for most people. But if you stay committed to it over the years, it is absolutely attainable.

I think opening a studio on credit in this day and age is asking for financial ruin. Unless you are a guy with a proven track record, with clients beating down your door with fists full of cash.

Pouring money into something with the hope that you will attract enough work to pay for it all is cause for being laughed out of a bank. Not trying to be a dick, just being real. I looked into trying to do the same thing when I started out, and in hindsight, I'm glad nobody was stupid enough to lend me a bunch of money.

Don't get dissuaded. You can do good work with minimal investment these days with modern recording technology. I'd just encourage you to do the best possible work you can with what you have available, work your ass off and hustle for money any way you (legally) can, and strap in for the long haul. You'll be where you want to be before you know it.
Old 14th December 2015
  #3
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redgrovesound's Avatar
I also realize you're not talking about my scenario in your OP, but felt compelled to share one perspective.
Old 14th December 2015
  #4
I think the biggest misconception in the music business is that a studio can simply appear overnight. Occasionally they do, but often those ones disappear just as quickly. The nicest owner operated studios in my town are the result of years and years of hard work. The first few years would have been simple, and quite possibly operated at a financial loss.

It is simply a case of building a reputation, gaining clients and income, then reinvesting some of the profit back into the studio infrastructure and equipment.

Of course there are other ways to do it, particularly if you have other avenues of finance and capital.
Old 14th December 2015
  #5
Lives for gear
As hard as it is to believe, some people find a way to make money in this business. Not a lot, but maybe enough to justify bigger purchases.
Also, many of the mid level studios you speak of started back before the Internet, and bands would hire them, they collected gear, and the owner still loves his job and his old clients still remember the guy and won't ever leave him alone
Old 14th December 2015
  #6
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AnalogBrain's Avatar
 

Thanks guys.

I've been acquiring gear for the past ten years.
Running a respectable all analog studio out of the house.

But I need to get out of the house. I have kids now, and its just too much trying to work at home. I have totally outgrown my space.

I'm having to turn away work because its just not feasible anymore to record here anymore.

So as I look for a viable way to move my place, I can't help but wonder how people do it? And how to they make even a small living after they have their new space?

-Neil
Old 14th December 2015
  #7
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redgrovesound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogBrain View Post
Thanks guys.

I've been acquiring gear for the past ten years.
Running a respectable all analog studio out of the house.

But I need to get out of the house. I have kids now, and its just too much trying to work at home. I have totally outgrown my space.

I'm having to turn away work because its just not feasible anymore to record here anymore.

So as I look for a viable way to move my place, I can't help but wonder how people do it? And how to they make even a small living after they have their new space?

-Neil
I've had the same thoughts myself. Sounds like we're not in dissimilar positions. Our family is beginning to outgrow our house, as is the tolerance for people coming in and out of it.

I've pondered the thought of leasing some space, and am also considering looking for property with a house and an outbuilding.

But I'm not trying to turn this into a full time living for myself. Would I love to some day? You bet. Do I have the clients and projected work to risk my family's livelihood on it right now? Absolutely not.

If I ever do become a "full time" engineer, it will likely coincide with my children having left the house and / or retirement from my day job.

Until then, I'll do a handful of projects each year, and do the best work I can on them. I don't really need a commercial space to do that. Though an outbuilding would make life significantly easier.

That said, I live in an area of the country where real estate prices are not astronomical. My thoughts would probably be different if I lived in a major metropolitan area.
Old 14th December 2015
  #8
Lives for gear
 

I can't answer this for you because there are so many different way to get there.
You just have to make it happen.

When I started I was 19 years-old and I tried every angle I could think of.
Eventually, I teamed up with an older acquaintance / friend who's father bank-rolled us.
You just can't beat old, Texas oil money...
This partnership ended up financing our little 1" 8-track studio in 1975 and lasted until we decided to down-size from an eight room facility in 2001.
However, I realize that these situations don't come along for everyone.

In the '80s I split off and opened a music oriented studio with a musician friend.
I already had a fairly sophisticated writer's studio, so my partner borrowed money from his parents and we bought out and existing, small 24-track studio.
We were able to borrow from his parents over the years.
Truthfully, borrowing from one partner's parents is not a great idea.
In my case, we had maybe $64K in debt to this guy's parents and he was as useless on an ashtray on a motorcycle once the studio's business grew.
After 9 years I had to cut my losses and walk away from the debt.
I was fortunate to be welcomed back with the original studio that I started in 1975 which had grown to be a powerhouse radio/TV facility.

Even in the '70s and '80s banks were not going to make unsecured business loans.
In fact, banks have always wanted some type of collateral to secure all loans.
They definitely don't want to own recording equipment and in truth, the equipment never brings what it cost when it has to be sold.
The profit margin of even the most successful studios is far below what legitimate banks want to see.
This is even after you put up either money in a CD or real estate.

Even in the case of the radio/TV facility all of our loans were through the large bank in Dallas and they were personally guaranteed by my friend's dad.
It was interesting because the money was available to build a world class facility, but we had to justify all of the loans.
We had to be 100% sure that we could repay the loan(s) and because my friend's dad sat on the board with us we had to be very business-like.
It was a fantastic business education!

So, while we had a nearly un-limited credit line we had to perform well enough to repay the loans or else they would not be available.
All of this caused us to be very conservative.
We only bought what we needed although we always had a nice facility.
We went 24 track in 1980 and had a very professional room with a very professional client base.
This studio went from only me drawing a $350 per month salary in 1975 to a facility with eight studios that employed 22 people in the '90s.

I'll be honest and tell you that ALL of the rooms I knew of in Texas were owned by people who had wealthy parents or grandparents.
Even with this money I saw A LOT of studios fail.
As an investment, a studio gives you a TERRIBLE return on your investment.
As an example, the radio/TV facility with eight rooms and 22 employees didn't make any of us wealthy.
It did provide a decent paycheck, real health insurance and a nice Christmas bonus each year.

I have also seen quite a few studios fund major equipment purchases after a studio fire (twice), floods (two or three times) and insurance settlements.

My suggestion to anyone is to grow as you are able.
It isn't ever really possible to justify the cost of the equipment versus the return.
Don't take out loans unless they are from VERY understanding family members.
It is VERY easy spend money that you can't repay.
Old 14th December 2015
  #9
They get good earning from the audio work or they have a side job that pays well or they have something to sell. Or even a lotto if lucky
Old 14th December 2015
  #10
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nyandres's Avatar
Pretty much what the other guys are saying.

I am a software engineer primarily. I love it, but I love making music just as much. So I use the money I make from my career as well as from my music related work to buy gear. I actually did buy most of the recording gear in the course of a year. But all the instruments for performance which is half of what makes up my studio was aquired over the course of years of playing as it is in large part the gear I used myself.
Old 14th December 2015
  #11
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bgood's Avatar
Where do guys get the cash to open any business?

It's fascinating to me when engineer cats that aren't musicians risk it all to do a build out. I totally understand how a musician could talk himself into doing it, but and engineer? That's so amazing and inspiring to me.

In LA there seems to be quite a few suite type places opening up... You rent a smallish space that's yours, but you can book time in the facilitie's various large rooms as needed.

Craigslist is sick with them...
Old 14th December 2015
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LDStudios View Post
It is simply a case of building a reputation, gaining clients and income, then reinvesting some of the profit back into the studio infrastructure and equipment.
Puh...
Pro...
Prah.... fit?

What is this strange term you speak of?

Old 14th December 2015
  #13
I worked as a sound engineer on a cruise ship for a bit. Great way to save money, as you don't pay for food or acommodation, and I was on aprox $650 a week.
I also play online poker. I won $8k one week, added it to my savings and got a bank loan of £5k and that was enough to build 3 rehearsal rooms. Putting every penny back into the business, I had the recording side open within the first year.
About to go in to year 4, and I'm still expanding and making more money every month.

I did all of the building work myself to keep costs down. Initial build (for 3 treated rehearsal rooms) was aprox £30k. Later built the control room/booth for about £11k. Not including equipment.
Old 14th December 2015
  #14
Lives for gear
 

Don't work for free

Don't charge low because the other guy does

don't buy new clothes for 5 years,
don't buy a new car for 10 years
don't go on holiday for 10 years

repair / build some of your gear
do ALL of your own cables

lose the ego

BE BETTER THAN THE OTHER GUY
Old 14th December 2015
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogBrain View Post
Thanks guys.

I've been acquiring gear for the past ten years.
Running a respectable all analog studio out of the house.

But I need to get out of the house. I have kids now, and its just too much trying to work at home. I have totally outgrown my space.

I'm having to turn away work because its just not feasible anymore to record here anymore.

So as I look for a viable way to move my place, I can't help but wonder how people do it? And how to they make even a small living after they have their new space?

-Neil
Why not develop a good relationship with an existing studio? The projects you can't do at home, you hire their space for.

It's the way just about everyone who isn't John Shanks, JJP or Flood does it these days. You have a production space suitable for overdubs, programming and mixing. On the sessions where you need to record drums, you hire a big space for. Few days per album. You do the rest in your production space.

Unless you're recording the sort of band who has to play together constantly, this is really cost effective and efficient.

The instant you open a "commercial studio" you cease to be an engineer producer and you become a studio owner firstly - taking bookings to pay for the studio. It shouldn't be can you a afford to run a studio, you should only build/set up the space you can't afford not to have.
Old 14th December 2015
  #16
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogBrain View Post
Hey guys,
I'm talking about the middle level local studio.
I see guys here buying $five figure$ consoles, and racks of great gear and a buildout that must cost tens of thousands.How do they do it?
More than likely, on credit. But don't assume that good credit = a great life. Most people know their credit score but couldn't tell you their net worth (what you own minus what you owe, or assets minus liabilities). There are some people who are smart with their money and pay in cash and don't use credit. But those people are the minority for sure while the majority of folks have been brainwashed that borrowing money is the only way to get ahead in life.



Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogBrain View Post
I almost got laughed out of my bank just for inquiring about a $30,000 "business" loan. I would have to put my house up for collateral, and that was the upper limit of personal loans they do (my credit union doesn't do business loans).
You don't need a business loan. You can learn how to manage money, stay out of debt, and save. I know, it's not sexy. Most people here will tell you that it's ok, everyone does it, and it's a part of life and it's there for a reason.

But I would be very careful taking advice from people who have debt, don't know or care about their net worth, and that think getting a loan from a bank is the only or best way to get ahead. There are reasons the middle class keeps suffering. And one of the biggest factors is they have been lied into thinking debt is a good thing. I'm here to tell you...it's not, at all. Normal is being broke, having car payments, tons of credit card debt and living paycheck to paycheck. If that's what you want, keep trying the debt angle. Hope that works out for ya.
Old 14th December 2015
  #17
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dights's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogBrain View Post
Hey guys,

I'm absolutely curious, and can't figure it out.

I'm not talking about the $1,000,000+ facilities where there must be investors or somebody is independently wealthy.
And I'm not talking about the guys who save up for a few years (and max out some CCs) and upgrade their project studio.

I'm talking about the middle level local studio.
I see guys here buying $five figure$ consoles, and racks of great gear and a buildout that must cost tens of thousands.How do they do it?

I almost got laughed out of my bank just for inquiring about a $30,000 "business" loan. I would have to put my house up for collateral, and that was the upper limit of personal loans they do (my credit union doesn't do business loans).

Where do these guys get these huge chunks of change to build a studio?

Dumbfounded,
-Neil
As many have already said, when you see mid-level local studios with a reasonable amount of gear it's quite likely that this is the culmination of years of acquiring gear bit by bit. Just because someone has lots of gear doesn't mean they bought it in one go.

The studio gear that I have has been accumulated over 15 years piece by piece, and after big projects I would invest back into the studio with another piece in the jigsaw.

Don't get me wrong, there are people out there who set up nice mid-level local studios that are decked out in gear all in one go. However these are usually privately funded, the owners are wealthy or have wealthy relatives. Getting a bank loan to do such a thing these days would be quite a poor investment in my opinion, and you'll probably find that these people aren't actually turning good profit, but hey... they're wealthy.

As you've said, you're ready to move. It also sounds like you've got enough gear for a decent studio set up. So you could just find a studio place to rent and try it out. That's what I did, and when I initially moved in I didn't have anywhere near the equipment I have now. It won't cost that much, just a deposit of a month or so of rent. Then you just need to cover the monthly rent overhead. You could even share the space with another engineer or producer that you know, share your gear and halve your costs.

The other option is to build a studio yourself. I know people who have rented industial space and built a studio shell inside it, it will cost money on the outlay but over years you will save lots of money compared to renting. Renting industrial space is far less expensive than renting a treated studio space in a complex!

I also have friends who have converted their lofts or outbuildings into studio spaces, but then you have the same issue of the studio being at your own home.

I suppose the answer you don't want to hear is: it's not easy however you try to do it, and once you have that space it's not easy keeping it either
Old 14th December 2015
  #18
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logicll's Avatar
 

First off do you have a client base to support growth?

With commercial studios it’s all about angles MOM and DAD’s money, an investor or a side income.

I know guys who make great money off of licensing (generic) music..

Do anything non-music related and it will make money to throw in the sinkhole called music/studio.
Old 14th December 2015
  #19
Work with what you have and buy what you need not what you want. Sweetwater no interest for 2 years helped me get some gear I wanted now as well
Old 14th December 2015
  #20
Gear Maniac
 

When I shut down my studio back in 2001, I sold the majority of my gear to a Nigerian guy who -- it eventually was revealed -- had made a really big drug deal, and gotten out of the game. Very nice guy.
Old 14th December 2015
  #21
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogBrain View Post
Hey guys,

I'm absolutely curious, and can't figure it out.

I'm not talking about the $1,000,000+ facilities where there must be investors or somebody is independently wealthy.
And I'm not talking about the guys who save up for a few years (and max out some CCs) and upgrade their project studio.

I'm talking about the middle level local studio.
I see guys here buying $five figure$ consoles, and racks of great gear and a buildout that must cost tens of thousands.How do they do it?

I almost got laughed out of my bank just for inquiring about a $30,000 "business" loan. I would have to put my house up for collateral, and that was the upper limit of personal loans they do (my credit union doesn't do business loans).

Where do these guys get these huge chunks of change to build a studio?

Dumbfounded,
-Neil
Work.

I've built my business for 20+ years, all from music. Started in high school, playing in bands, working in a music store....in college, playing in bands working in a recording studio. I always had a studio setup in my home. Then I rented a small warehouse for rehearsal space and studio space. At that time, I was playing in bands, working in my own studio, and working in other studios. I eventually quit playing in bands, to spend more time making records. Now I work in my studio and run a record label. All this time, I've been picking up gear along the way.

This entire time I've worked 60,70,80 hours a week. I've worked every weekend forever. I work on holidays. Talk to any business owner that managed to stay in business over 2 years and they will tell you the EXACT SAME THING. My friends in the corporate world think I'm nuts, but I think they're nuts. Everyday is fun and I love it. They complain how everyday sucks. I'm 42 years old, I gonna try to do it for another 42 years.

There has never been a better time to start a recording studio. All you need is a laptop and 80hours a week. Just make sure you're better than everyone else and only make music that people like and you'll be fine.

Cheers!
Old 14th December 2015
  #22
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nightchef's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iaminnominate View Post
You don't need a business loan. You can learn how to manage money, stay out of debt, and save. I know, it's not sexy. Most people here will tell you that it's ok, everyone does it, and it's a part of life and it's there for a reason.
This seems like an appropriate time of year to answer you thus:



In all seriousness, though, I wonder what result we would get if we polled all the Gearslutz members who are running successful commercial studios to see how many of them got to where they are without ever taking on debt to finance capital expenditures. I suspect the percentage would be tiny. But I'd be curious.
Old 14th December 2015
  #23
If you are a poor you are a customer and you pay the highest price.

If you are a business, you'll have some to spend, tax advantages and you'll get some more discount.

If you are a really succesfull business, you'll have plenty to spend and you'll get great deals and discounts.

If you're a 'star' money will be pooring all out of your pockets and everybody will push their stuff on you for free, you'll have so much stuff you'll don't know what to do with it.

Wich category you are in is all a matter of attitude I guess...
Old 14th December 2015
  #24
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Sk106's Avatar
 

I'd like to echo what many have said above. I don't own alot of hardware, I'm no studio owner, but I got an efficient workplace set up that can make some non-music people 'sigh' in desire.

It's important to see through the illusion. A beautiful studio photo can feel like the owner got most of it made and can live happily ever after. But in truth, that photo is usually a snapshot of a constantly changing and evolving thing that's been going on for years and years. The owner of it do not feel the same thing you feel when you look at that picture. Whatever new thing you get, it loses its allure very quickly once you get it. You often want what you don't have, because you attribute that desire of satisfaction to the picture/dream/gear you see. The essence of a gearslut, perhaps? :P

I might look at a photo of a male bodybuilder in great shape and think "Hm, I wouldn't mind looking kindof like that", but what I don't see is all this strict boring diet of tuna and powders, can't have sweets/fastfood/alcohol, and all those hellish months/years lifting iron in the gym whether you want to or not. We people tend to just see the goods, not what's behind it.

For myself, like many above, this is what I do. It's all that I do. I don't race fancy cars or motorcycles, or got a huge house which takes up time, or go on monthlong world exploration vacations, or spend 2 hours in the gym every day, or do alot of team sports, I don't hang out with the guys in the city center at night etc. This, the music thing, is what I do. All day, every day, and it's been like that since as far back as I can remember.
I've had opportunities to go into other areas of things, like teaching or administration ... people have always suggested I should work with other things so that I can get to do what I really want to do. That equation doesn't work out in my mind. If I work with that, then I don't get to do this. It's as simple as that, to me. If I work as a busdriver, then that's what I do, takes up 80% of my time and energy. I'd be afraid to 'get stuck' in doing something else instead.

With gear, you just accumulate alot of things with time. I've had older colleagues give me hardware (and software) for free, kindof as encouragement or support, because they're at pension age and winding their own thing down, they know me since before and feel I'm a serious character etc. That would never have happened if I worked as a busdriver and did music on the side.

I bet, if you been fixing cars/bikes most your life, work at a car repair shop, race cars a bit on your free time and attend car exhibitions/gatherings etc, then you just start attracting things that comes your way in your field. Tips and rumors of great deals arrive at your ears before they reach other ears. You attract more offers in your area of things, because people know what you're about. You attract tips, learn where the great waterholes are etc etc.

I do know of people who's been amassing plenty of money in just 1-2 years, by working really hard with suspiciously profitable things. They can build up a decent park of gear pretty quick, but since they don't have the social network they don't get any other clients than stage-hungry 16/17 yo amateur girls. They're not seen as serious characters by the established folks in the biz, because they haven't been around before, nobody knows them, and people are kindof suspicious and not comfortable about them. They generally don't get recommendations by the serious ppl in the biz either.

Last edited by Sk106; 14th December 2015 at 07:04 PM..
Old 14th December 2015
  #25
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toledo3's Avatar
 

I learned to program crazy video graphics stuff while working another job...

...which then led to doing a bunch of it professionally, for groups like Beastie Boys, Green Day, deadmau5, Bon Jovi, John Mayer, Foo Fighters, Prince, squarepusher, etc.

...and with that, I buy my mikey phones, preamps, etc.

Long before that though, I had my own studio and rehearsal venue for a few years - ran it with my father... fairly low end.

Music and art can be a rough career, and there are undoubtedly many ups and downs for even people at the top of the pile.

There is a comment above:

"Do anything non-music related and it will make money to throw in the sinkhole called music/studio."

Sounds about right.

I would say, when you make an investment in music gear, think of it like a real business. How many hours will you have to work, or how many things will you have to sell to make that money back, or make money from having the thing!?

When I crunch the numbers, and they don't pan out, I just think... "well, I do want the experience of having one of those things to use before I kick the bucket." And then I try to guess if I am going to take a loss on it if I ever decide to sell it, and how much. If that is a reasonable number, then it's just paying for a pleasurable life experience, more or less.
Old 14th December 2015
  #26
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logicll's Avatar
 

I am frustrated with this “business” , 99% of people front, lie and cheat.

I have slowly accumulated world-class gear (no vacation, health insurance or extras) and worked in major studios. Took 20 years to get "this far"

The studio I am in now (#3 on Google for the state), we have worked with artist from Justin Bieber to Sublime and it doesn’t bring in great clients!!

I am loosing clients to the cheap $35.00 an hour rooms with crap gear… while seeing kids fresh out of “audio school” getting on AES panels and doing interviews….(yes, yes tell us of your vast experience on those TWO albums you worked on.)
Old 14th December 2015
  #27
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by clearwave View Post
Work.
+1

That's along the lines of my path and big +1 to the fact that not all of us have family money or outside income etc, I gigged, ran a wedding band, taught some lessons, produced (LOTS) of stuff, play church gigs etc etc etc. It's possible, you just have to work you ass off and understand that comparatively that other friend who got an EE degree and job with Western Digital is going to make more...

Also I don't ski, snowboard, buy ATV's or guns or any other expensive hobbies. I camp, hike, jog, and solder!

The other thing I would add in there is that it's all about long term planning. My wife and I bought a house that has a MIL apartment and rent it now it cash flows over the mortgage. Now we bought another commercially zoned place where I will eventually be able to build a *real* studio, but we are going to cash-flow it while expensing (tax write off) the stages of developing it.

Pay as you go is much better than financing. People think they need something big and fancy to make money and you don't, clean your bathroom, practice your instrument(!!!!!) and get good enough to provide real value and grow from there.
Old 14th December 2015
  #28
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AnalogBrain's Avatar
 

Hey guys,
Thanks for the advice.
A lot of it is pretty common sense, and I absolutely am NOT looking for a quick easy way to moving out of the house.

I have ZERO debt (No car, loan, student loan nothing) aside from home mortgage and plan to keep it that way.

I have been saving for a few years and have a little chunk.
I am already running an analog studio. So I don't NEED any gear.

I still however, can't understand these guys over at the Studio Build thread who live in small towns and are building these 6 figure studios with new API 1608s?

Even if its all credit, how can they make enough to pay for a $3,000 finance payment each month along with a little something to bring home.

The only thing that seems viable is the industrial warehouse (shell within a shell) idea. But to do it halfway decent is still $25,000 or more.

I'm not looking for the easy way, just sick of turning down work.

Also, the work from other places idea is great, and i've done it. but most studios around here are just a computer in a room, with no analog gear to speak of. And most artists budget won't allow to rent a room, and pay me on top of it.


Thanks guys for ideas,
-Neil
Old 14th December 2015
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by clearwave View Post
Work.

I've built my business for 20+ years, all from music. Started in high school, playing in bands, working in a music store....in college, playing in bands working in a recording studio. I always had a studio setup in my home. Then I rented a small warehouse for rehearsal space and studio space. At that time, I was playing in bands, working in my own studio, and working in other studios. I eventually quit playing in bands, to spend more time making records. Now I work in my studio and run a record label. All this time, I've been picking up gear along the way.

This entire time I've worked 60,70,80 hours a week. I've worked every weekend forever. I work on holidays. Talk to any business owner that managed to stay in business over 2 years and they will tell you the EXACT SAME THING. My friends in the corporate world think I'm nuts, but I think they're nuts. Everyday is fun and I love it. They complain how everyday sucks. I'm 42 years old, I gonna try to do it for another 42 years.

There has never been a better time to start a recording studio. All you need is a laptop and 80hours a week. Just make sure you're better than everyone else and only make music that people like and you'll be fine.

Cheers!
inspiring! thanks.
Old 14th December 2015
  #30
Lives for gear
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogBrain View Post
Hey guys,
I still however, can't understand these guys over at the Studio Build thread who live in small towns and are building these 6 figure studios with new API 1608s?

Even if its all credit, how can they make enough to pay for a $3,000 finance payment each month along with a little something to bring home.
In the early 90s I went together with a number of guys and we all invested in a Soundcraft Saffire 24 console and an Otari 16tr tape machine along with a few outboards and mics. If you join your finances with others, you can get pretty far - especially if each of you can take out a small loan along with it.
Perhaps the guys in the Studio build thread owns things together with other people, but they speak of it as their own? (either unintentionally or intentionally).
I know a guy who works as the inhouse engineer of an SSL-equipped midsized studio owned and run by the culture department of the municipality. He tends to speak of it as 'his studio'.

Or the obvious: have you asked those guys about precisely this? Try not to sound accusing or questioning, and you might get some honest explanations
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