The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Culture Vulture VS Culture Vulture Mastering Edition
Old 20th January 2007
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Culture Vulture VS Culture Vulture Mastering Edition

I need some help here, I'm about to treat myself to something special, but have a serious question.... I've only experimented with the mastering edition (loved it to death) and was wondering whether I could save some money and get the normal Culture Vulture??? I'm really only wondering how much the sonics differ between these two units???
Old 20th January 2007
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Sui_City's Avatar
 

The sound shouldn't differ much at all, it is only the balanced in and outs and the detented outputs pots on the mastering edition that diifere from the normal version.

great box
Old 20th January 2007
  #3
Gear Nut
 

R. Meltzer had something to say about culture vulture in his book, "Gulcher." Probably not applicable here except as pertains to rockroll as social phenomonon. All knob fiddlin' referred to as euphamism only.

Good read if you can find it.
Old 20th January 2007
  #4
Gear Nut
 

In various descriptions, I read some talk of "military grade tubes" in the "Mastering Edition", could the sound differ dramatically as a result???
Old 21st January 2007
  #5
Gear Nut
 

BUMP
Old 25th February 2009
  #6
MV owner here...

The Mastering one has Valves that will last longer. Plus the knobs have steps, while the NO Mastering one just turns freely, so it's difficult to set previous settings again... to me it is just a matter of how do you use it: experimentally? Go normal version. You get that final touch from the Culture Black Thing? You know what can give you? Go Mastering Version (it can give you a lot).

YOMV... your opinion may vary
Old 26th February 2009
  #7
regular non MV here and I love it. when I ordered mine from mercenary they were out of the regular version so they sent me the mastering version. I guess I had it for almost a month before they got me the regular version.

guess they figured it'd be hard to give up - but it's a steep increase in price.

anyway - bottom line is - sonically they sound/function the same in my rig.

I've got mine on an effect bus that I use to run final mixes through before going back into the box. it really gives stuff a solid true analog feel.

I also use it as a straight up distortion effect in weird and extreme ways. It's a flexible box and works in a wide range of applications.

I couldn't justify the extra cost of the mastering version given the way that I use it - and knowing the history of how the non mastering version had been used up to that point.

Great Box either way.
Old 2nd March 2009
  #8
Lives for gear
 
duvalle's Avatar
 

"The Phoenix is being updated continually and this unit is the Master version (suffix M) with higher stability and faster release than earlier models. A side chain filter has now been added to provide 75Hz & 150Hz, but more permutations are possible when the MC is used in stereo mode with the link switch engaged.

The Master Phoenix is easier to recall as it has a mixture of indented and switched controls and the screwdriver adjustment on the chassis behind the meters controls the current through the valves on this unit, so this corrects to some extent for valve ageing. A screwdriver is supplied with the Master Phoenix and should be used periodically to adjust the meters to zero"


Old 3rd March 2009
  #9
Gear Addict
 
Siem's Avatar
 

I have the mastering version and I used the non mastering version before. I think if I had to buy it again I might go for the non mastering version.
We did a rough AB test once in the studio and we couldn't tell them apart. Before the test I had the feeling the non mastering version sounded warmer.
the mastering version has different lowpass filters settings, why they choose for these specific filter frequencies I don't know. The non mastering knobs look much more classy, the mastering knobs look like the cheapest ones you can buy at a hobby electronics store. The stepped knobs are handy, but the bias knob is not stepped and very sensitive (but you can use the meter for setting that one).
Oh and you - can - get lit meters when you ask for it, otherwise the only light will be the green powerlight on the front (plus the valves inside).
Old 3rd March 2009
  #10
Lives for gear
 
seaneldon's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by redvelvetstudios View Post
guess they figured it'd be hard to give up - but it's a steep increase in price
Nupe. We just do cool things like that whenever we can so you don't have to wait for new tools heh
Old 4th March 2009
  #11
Lives for gear
 
duvalle's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Siem View Post
I have the mastering version and I used the non mastering version before. I think if I had to buy it again I might go for the non mastering version.
thx for the info - very interesting ... could save me some cash.

cheers!
Old 4th March 2009
  #12
well, ya'll rule! I've had nothing but the best experiences with you guys. I got an SPL SMC from you guys that was bonk and you turned around the replacement asap so I could make my session. Thanks again!

Quote:
Originally Posted by seaneldon View Post
Nupe. We just do cool things like that whenever we can so you don't have to wait for new tools heh
Old 30th December 2010
  #13
Gear Head
 
Chris White's Avatar
 

---- August 5th, 2011 Update: Welcome visitor! I guess you're here because you're wondering about the differences between the CV and the Mastering version? Well, jump right down to Post #26 (click) for the *definitive* comparison in a bite-sized all-in-one post. It contains everything that's been said so far, as well as new discoveries. Enjoy! ----

Hi everyone,

We've decided to get a Culture Vulture for our studio, since we love what it does. However, we've only tried the non-Mastering version.

The Mastering version has the following extras:
* Balanced ins/outs
* Detented knobs for easy recall
* Higher quality valves which means the unit will live longer
* Better matched valves to ensure that the two channels sound the same, which helps when processing stereo material


We don't really care about the balanced ins/outs (it's a distortion unit after all), but the rest sounds very nice... very nice indeed. Particularly being able to recall settings by noting the knob positions, and of course easier stereo matching by being able to reference precise knob positions.

Here are some questions:

* Does anyone know if the detents on the knob are fine enough to avoid that problem of "oh snap, 11 sounds too subtle; OH SNAP, 12 SOUNDS TOO OVERWHELMING"? I hope it doesn't suffer the problem of overly broad knob steps?

* How does it sound if you sweep the various parameters (particularly Bias and Drive) on the detented knobs? Does it sound harshly stepped? I would guess the benefit of easy recall given by the mastering version comes at the cost of being unable to do smooth sweeps for effect purposes?

* I've heard that the detented knobs on the mastering version feel very cheap and flimsy, is this true?


We are not in any hurry to get the unit and would really appreciate any and all answers to these questions, particularly the second question which could force us to get the regular version instead. Answers to these questions have not been seen elsewhere (I've checked all threads on GS re: the CV), and I'm sure it would definitely help out other prospective buyers as well. Thanks in advance.
Old 2nd February 2011
  #14
Gear Head
 
Chris White's Avatar
 

---- August 5th, 2011 Update: Welcome visitor! I guess you're here because you're wondering about the differences between the CV and the Mastering version? Well, jump right down to Post #26 (click) for the *definitive* comparison in a bite-sized all-in-one post. It contains everything that's been said so far, as well as new discoveries. Enjoy! ----

With a Culture Vulture Mastering Version in our studio, I'm now able to answer the questions for anyone that stumbles upon this topic:

* The detents are only on the Input Drive and Output Volume knobs (not on the Bias knob), and they are extremely fine. There is no problem whatsoever of overly broad steps. You will be able to get exactly the result you want. Even sweeping the stepped drive knob doesn't sound harshly stepped at all. It is indeed very fine.

* The detents on the knobs help greatly both for session recall purposes and when matching the volume of the two channels. Start out by setting the Input Drive of each channel to the same amount, then do the same for the Output Volume. Next, sweep the un-detented Bias knobs without any audio going through the unit (otherwise it affects the meters). Do this to match the VU meters for the two channels, as they show how much current flows through the valves and are very accurate. You will now have completely stereo-matched channels. This is unlike the non-Mastering Version, where people constantly complain of unmatched channels, due to its lack of detented knobs and its lower quality and less-matched tubes. I've heard plenty of people that see their non-Mastering units as "2 separate units" rather than a stereo processor for these reasons. If processing stereo material is important to you (and it most likely is), get the Mastering Version, no doubt about it. You can take a gamble with a regular version if you are trying to save some money, but you will risk getting tubes that sound very different for the two channels.

* "Higher quality valves in the Mastering unit that live longer". I can't comment on this, but even if your non-Mastering version tubes fail, Thermionic (via Unity Audio UK) sells replacement tubes for £95. I can't really call the longer-life Mastering tubes a significant benefit, considering that replacement tubes are so affordable.

* Lastly, about the various people reporting that the detented knobs feel cheap and flimsy: That's partly true. As mentioned above, the two controls that use detented knobs are the Input Drive and the Output Volume. The Input Drive feels VERY solid, smooth and high quality. The Output Volume is another story; it's plasticky, creaky and flimsy, but not more than to be a minor annoyance and it's still immensely usable. I have received word from from Unity Audio and Thermionic that they are looking for a matching replacement, and that if they find one it'll be easy to get a replacement kit and solder in the new pots yourself (or a friend that's good with electronics), or to send it in for a fee.

That should answer all of the questions. In short: Get the Mastering Version, it is well worth it.


Chris White
Old 6th June 2011
  #15
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris White View Post
With a Culture Vulture Mastering Version in our studio, I'm now able to answer the questions for anyone that stumbles upon this topic:

* The detents are only on the Input Drive and Output Volume knobs (not on the Bias knob), and they are extremely fine. There is no problem whatsoever of overly broad steps. You will be able to get exactly the result you want. Even sweeping the stepped drive knob doesn't sound harshly stepped at all. It is indeed very fine.

* The detents on the knobs help greatly both for session recall purposes and when matching the volume of the two channels. Start out by setting the Input Drive of each channel to the same amount, then do the same for the Output Volume. Next, sweep the un-detented Bias knobs without any audio going through the unit (otherwise it affects the meters). Do this to match the VU meters for the two channels, as they show how much current flows through the valves and are very accurate. You will now have completely stereo-matched channels. This is unlike the non-Mastering Version, where people constantly complain of unmatched channels, due to its lack of detented knobs and its lower quality and less-matched tubes. I've heard plenty of people that see their non-Mastering units as "2 separate units" rather than a stereo processor for these reasons. If processing stereo material is important to you (and it most likely is), get the Mastering Version, no doubt about it. You can take a gamble with a regular version if you are trying to save some money, but you will risk getting tubes that sound very different for the two channels.

* "Higher quality valves in the Mastering unit that live longer". I can't comment on this, but even if your non-Mastering version tubes fail, Thermionic (via Unity Audio UK) sells replacement tubes for £95. I can't really call the longer-life Mastering tubes a significant benefit, considering that replacement tubes are so affordable.

* Lastly, about the various people reporting that the detented knobs feel cheap and flimsy: That's partly true. As mentioned above, the two controls that use detented knobs are the Input Drive and the Output Volume. The Input Drive feels VERY solid, smooth and high quality. The Output Volume is another story; it's plasticky, creaky and flimsy, but not more than to be a minor annoyance and it's still immensely usable. I have received word from from Unity Audio and Thermionic that they are looking for a matching replacement, and that if they find one it'll be easy to get a replacement kit and solder in the new pots yourself (or a friend that's good with electronics), or to send it in for a fee.

That should answer all of the questions. In short: Get the Mastering Version, it is well worth it.


Chris White
\

excellent post mate exactly what i needed to read.....
Old 6th June 2011
  #16
@Chris White - Totally agree with your opinion of the non mastered version - mine has a creaky output knob on one channel & both channels sound different - not massively - but enough to make lining it up for stereo a bit of a pain in the arse.. The sound quality of what comes out of it though more than exonerates it!
Old 6th June 2011
  #17
Lives for gear
 
Batchainpuller78's Avatar
 

well I haven't heard the MV+ yet only the normal version but just looking at the site the MV+ has a distortion setting or two extra?
Old 21st June 2011
  #18
Gear Head
 
Chris White's Avatar
 

---- August 5th, 2011 Update: Welcome visitor! I guess you're here because you're wondering about the differences between the CV and the Mastering version? Well, jump right down to Post #26 (click) for the *definitive* comparison in a bite-sized all-in-one post. It contains everything that's been said so far, as well as new discoveries. Enjoy! ----

Hey everyone, glad to hear that you found my posts helpful.

@Batchainpuller78: Both the normal and Mastering version have the exact same three distortion modes; Triode, Pentode 1 and Pentode 2. The differences between the two versions are listed earlier in this thread, see my posts (post #13 and #14).

The one you're thinking of was the very limited-availability Anniversary edition which added extended overdrive and some additional distortion modes (10 rather than 3), but the extra modes were nothing other than a lowpass filter put in serial with the 3 original distortion modes, to soften them in various ways. Don't even think about trying to find an Anniversary edition though; they're long since sold out at every dealer in the entire world, and the chances of seeing one on eBay are very slim since very few were made and most people don't part with theirs. Sure, the filtering was a very nice extra to have built right into the box, but anyone can run their normal Culture Vulture through a filter and get better results, so you're really not missing out on anything worthwhile.


Chris White
Old 21st June 2011
  #19
roc
Lives for gear
 
roc's Avatar
 

Do you know where I can find a CV MV ? They were a limited addition and sold out some time ago AFAIK .
Old 21st June 2011
  #20
Gear Head
 
Chris White's Avatar
 

---- August 5th, 2011 Update: Welcome visitor! I guess you're here because you're wondering about the differences between the CV and the Mastering version? Well, jump right down to Post #26 (click) for the *definitive* comparison in a bite-sized all-in-one post. It contains everything that's been said so far, as well as new discoveries. Enjoy! ----

Quote:
Originally Posted by roc View Post
Do you know where I can find a CV MV ? They were a limited addition and sold out some time ago AFAIK .
You're thinking of the Anniversary edition with the red faceplate and extra features (of which they sold both Normal and Mastering Anniversary versions), that's the only one that's no longer available since a very limited number of them were made for their anniversary.

Are you in Europe? If so, I suggest using Thomann for the lowest prices:

Normal: THERMIONIC CULTURE CULTURE VULTURE - Thomann UK Cyberstore
Mastering Plus: THERMIONIC CULTURE CULTURE VULTURE MASTER PLUS - Thomann UK Cyberstore

Refer to post #13 and #14 for the differences. The most significant difference is that the Mastering version is far better matched for stereo, which is a major reason to spend the extra cash on it. With the regular version you will most likely end up with two channels that sound quite different, making it difficult or time consuming to process stereo material with it (worst possible case you'd have to process the left/right channels 1 channel at a time, through just one of the distortion channels of the CV, to have the result sound the same). It's entirely down to luck whether you get a well-matched unit or not if you go for the normal version. With the Mastering version, Thermionic has gone through the trouble of finding extremely well-matched tubes so that you'll have zero issues processing stereo material. That was worth it for me.


Chris White
Old 22nd June 2011
  #21
fdc
Gear Head
 
fdc's Avatar
thx for the info.
i have a culture vulture at home at the moment. but the left channel is broken. i got it a bit cheaper but can give it back or let it repair.
but if the 2 channels are not well matched it´s no use for me cause i want to use it on my mixes.
so i ask better to give it back and save some bucks for the mastering version...or does this problem of not well matched channels occur only rarely?
what´s the experience of a normal culture vulture user?
Old 22nd June 2011
  #22
Here for the gear
 

i have the red mastering "Mullard" version, i think it's the bestculture vulture!
I don't care about the stepped pots but i think the additionnal pentode and squash mods are killers. I use it mostly for mixing rock and it's kind of a magic box for me
Old 22nd June 2011
  #23
Gear Addict
 
fivepoundmusic's Avatar
 

BTW, German musicstore now offers a limited run of units with green faceplate, mullard and siemens tubes, 10 distortion settings and an extra overdrive setting.
Old 30th July 2011
  #24
Gear Head
 
Chris White's Avatar
 

---- August 5th, 2011 Update: Welcome visitor! I guess you're here because you're wondering about the differences between the CV and the Mastering version? Well, jump right down to Post #26 (click) for the *definitive* comparison in a bite-sized all-in-one post. It contains everything that's been said so far, as well as new discoveries. Enjoy! ----

Quote:
Originally Posted by okailla View Post
BTW, German musicstore now offers a limited run of units with green faceplate, mullard and siemens tubes, 10 distortion settings and an extra overdrive setting.
Nice find! It's still in stock as of today.

Any European that missed out on the Red faceplate Anniversary Edition can get the Musicstore.com-exclusive "Green Grand Opening Edition" which was made to celebrate the opening of that store. It seems to be the same as the Anniversary edition except that it has a Green faceplate instead.

It definitely features the same Anniversary Edition Mullard tubes and the extra processing modes that apply various filters after the distortion circuitry.

Note that it's based on the normal version, not the Mastering version (whereas the Anniversary edition came in both normal and Mastering). This means no detented input/output knobs or balanced in/out, but you WILL be getting extremely well-matched tubes since this is like a "normal version on steroids". The lack of detented knobs does however make it harder to match volumes between channels, and to recall settings later.

Here are all 3 versions from that store, so that readers can compare:

1999 EUR Grand Opening Edition:
Thermionic Culture - Culture Vulture Grand Opening Ltd. Ed.,Siemens/Mullard Tubes : Dynamics / sound adjustments

1489 EUR Normal Version:
Thermionic Culture - Culture Vulture Stereo Valve Distortion : Dynamics / sound adjustments

1899 EUR Mastering Edition:
Thermionic Culture - Culture Vulture Master Plus Stereo Valve Distortion : Dynamics / sound adjustments

They're extremely limited so if anyone reading this has any urge for those extra filter modes - this is your only chance. You can just forget finding one via auctions later unless you search every day for years, so act immediately if you think you think this is for you. As an existing Mastering Edition owner, there's zero reason to change. The detented knobs are an important tool for recall, and the extra filter modes don't matter, as you can easily apply your own filter after the output of the Culture Vulture. However, I am sure having built-in filter modes is a pretty nice bonus for some people. With all this being said, I'd still suggest getting the Mastering PLUS instead. Read post #26 for information on that.


Chris White
Old 4th August 2011
  #25
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris White View Post
Hey everyone, glad to hear that you found my posts helpful.

@Batchainpuller78: Both the normal and Mastering version have the exact same three distortion modes; Triode, Pentode 1 and Pentode 2. The differences between the two versions are listed earlier in this thread, see my posts (post #13 and #14).
Chris White
no, just got a new MV+ today, it has an additional "P3" Pentode 3 setting, which sounds great! However the LPF is now just an on/off switch. I took a peak inside before turning it on as one tube appeared possibly loose(wasn't) and the PCB does say ltd edition on it.... same board as the green ones?
Check the pic on their site it shows the P3 update:
THERMIONIC CULTURE ALL VALVE DESIGN PROFESSIONAL AUDIO EQUIPMENT
Old 5th August 2011
  #26
Gear Head
 
Chris White's Avatar
 

------- UPDATED COMPARISON BETWEEN THE VARIOUS EDITIONS. THIS POST IS NOW THE ONLY COMPARISON YOU'LL EVER NEED. -------

My original comparison came from discussions with Thermionic Culture, but it turns out they had left out several of the differences. Then there's the whole "Mastering PLUS" thing, which is a massively updated Mastering unit that was released about a year ago (as it turns out, that's the one we have in our studio).

The lack of a proper "press releases" area of Thermionic's site made this news hard to catch, as well as the fact that they've removed the product page for the old Mastering version.

I've now been able to piece together what has happened, and the following covers *all* the differences between the three editions (Normal, the old Mastering Edition and the new Mastering PLUS), as well as everything else that's been said in the thread. This post is now the only comparison you'll ever need, and yes it has a lot of information, because it covers *everything* there is to know.


2007 or maybe even earlier: Culture Vulture Mastering Edition is released, with these differences compared to the Normal version:
  • Transformer-balanced ins/outs for less noise and less unwanted coloring of the sound.
  • Detented knobs for easy recall. The detents are only on the Input Drive and Output Volume knobs (not on the Bias knob), and they are extremely fine. There is no problem whatsoever of overly broad steps. You will be able to get exactly the result you want. Even sweeping the stepped drive knob doesn't sound harshly stepped at all. It is indeed very fine, and these detents help *greatly* with session recall. Some people say that the detented knobs feel cheap and flimsy: That's partly true. The Input Drive feels VERY solid, smooth and high quality. The Output Volume is another story; it's plasticky, creaky and flimsy, but not more than to be a minor annoyance and it's still immensely usable. I have received word from Unity Audio and Thermionic that they are looking for a matching replacement, and that if they find one it'll be easy to get a replacement kit and solder in the new pots yourself (or a friend that's good with electronics), or to send it in for a fee.
  • Higher quality, longer-life valves which means the unit will live longer without needing service. I can't comment on this, but even if your non-Mastering version tubes fail, Thermionic (via Unity Audio UK) sells replacement tubes for £95. I can't really call the longer-life Mastering tubes a significant benefit, considering that replacement tubes are so affordable.
  • Better matched valves to ensure that the two channels sound the same, which helps when processing stereo material. A large portion of people that have the non-Mastering units see theirs as "2 separate units" rather than a stereo processor, due to ending up with one that has badly matched tubes (this is very common). If processing stereo material is important to you (and it most likely is), get the Mastering Version, no doubt about it. You can take a gamble with a regular version if you are trying to save some money, but you will risk getting tubes that sound very different for the two channels.

Late 2010, maybe a bit earlier: Culture Vulture Mastering PLUS is released, and the old Mastering Edition is discontinued. Cosmetically it's a little bit different thanks to the new features, and the logo features the addition of the word "PLUS". There's a remarkable array of improvements, not least of which is that it now uses the exact same ultra-high-quality tubes that were previously only used in the extremely limited Anniversary edition! The new Mastering PLUS brings the following changes:
  • ALL OF THE ABOVE DIFFERENCES.
  • Military grade tubes throughout: 2x Mullard M8100 low noise high gain valves in the input stage, a pair of GE 5725s for Distortion effects, and the Philips 5963 in the output. By comparison, the normal CV uses very different, noisier, lower-end Tubes with inferior frequency response (input: 2x EF86, distortion: 2x 6AS6, output: 5963).
  • The improved tubes are the *EXACT SAME* ones as the Anniversary edition, and they lead to *very* low noise and far better frequency response than the old Mastering Edition (and of course the Normal version). The frequency response of the current NORMAL edition is "+/- 1.75dB over 50Hz to 15kHz (at low distortion)". The frequency response of the current MASTERING PLUS edition is "+0.5dB/-1dB over 40Hz to 20kHz".
  • One additional distortion type: The old P2 setting is now called P3, with P2 being a new setting that's similar to P1 but goes into mad distortion when the valve is overloaded. The normal version (and the old mastering version) only has T, P1 and P2 (with the latter, as mentioned, being P3 on the new Mastering PLUS Edition).
  • Instead of a single "bonus overdrive" setting (off/+20dB), it now has 3 overdrive settings (off/+10dB/+28dB), for a milder inbetween setting that's useful for gentler processing. Remember that this switch is just used *in addition to* the regular Drive knob, and is just used for bonus overdrive if you want more than the knob can give you. It's nice though to be able to flip a switch and get a semi-gentle +10dB drive boost without having to turn the two knobs, and it's definitely more useful than the single, extreme setting of +20dB.
  • The LPF switch on the Mastering PLUS Edition is now an on/off toggle of a 7kHz lowpass filter at 12dB/octave. The normal version (and old mastering version) has 3 settings instead: Off, 5kHz and 9kHz. This really does not matter, as 7kHz is a more logical cutoff point than 5/9. 7kHz preserves more air than 5kHz yet doesn't let in as much harshness as 9kHz. If you need additional flexibility, I'll continue to recommend that people pass the Culture Vulture output through a filter, as that lets you achieve any effect you could possibly want. It's as simple as that.
  • New toggle switches on each channel that lower the output by 10dB if enabled. These are very useful since the unit adds so much gain that the regular output knob benefits from a -10dB step of constant reduction first. This aids you in maintaining the same volume as the input material. We usually end up with these enabled at all times, as it makes Input/Output volume matching a breeze.


Now here are some final words about the Mastering Plus: The distortion of this unit goes from 0.2% THD to 99.5% THD. It spans the whole range from "gentle warming" to "absolute and total destruction". You can use it to distort or warm individual tracks or busses, or even to process the entire 2-mix if the song calls for it. The new Military-grade valves with their massively improved frequency response mean that you've got an excellent and extremely flexible unit for every possible usage case, as it lets you go from transparent to gentle warming to in-your-face and everything in-between.

Since these additional differences have been brought to light, I'll now say this without a shadow of a doubt: Get the Mastering PLUS edition. Don't even bother with the normal one.

With the "Mastering PLUS" you're getting an incredible unit, with the insanely good tubes that used to be reserved for the Anniversary Edition. In fact, the only difference to the rare Anniversary Edition is the lack of some gimmicky, dedicated filter-distortion-modes. However, as mentioned previously, that's a minor point as you're far better off just routing the CV output through a filter of your own and getting exactly the effect you want. The "Mastering PLUS" is now the best Culture Vulture you can get, by a long stretch!


Chris White
Old 9th August 2011
  #27
fdc
Gear Head
 
fdc's Avatar
thanks for the info. i ordered me a normal version but had to send it back cause one channel was broken (repair said a resistor needed to be exchanged). now they send me the repaired unit.
i wonder if its normal that you get a crack noise when switching between the modes.
Old 9th August 2011
  #28
Gear Head
 
Chris White's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fdc View Post
thanks for the info. i ordered me a normal version but had to send it back cause one channel was broken (repair said a resistor needed to be exchanged). now they send me the repaired unit.
i wonder if its normal that you get a crack noise when switching between the modes.
Hey there fdc!

Congratulations on getting a Culture Vulture! I'm sure you'll completely fall in love with it!

Yes, the noise as you switch between modes is the way it should be, as the mode switch literally reconfigures the physical pins on the vacuum tubes, changing which current goes where.

Vacuum Tubes are normally intended to be nothing more than clean amplifiers (they have a few more usage cases than that but that's the main one) and they usually have between 4-7 pins for the various inputs, gain, control voltages and outputs. The Culture Vulture achieves its beautiful distortion through applying extra gain along with various unintended pin configurations. As you're changing that mode switch, you're physically redirecting the electricity to the different pins, which leads to the different characteristics - and a brief noise as the pins readjust.

Have fun!


Chris White
Old 19th October 2011
  #29
Gear Head
 
Chris White's Avatar
 

I just found out that there's a baby-Vulture coming out. A single channel version aimed at guitarists (since they only need 1 channel) but equally usable by someone that processes a lot of mono synths, like a Moog for instance. The valves are not as high quality as the top-quality military valves in the Mastering PLUS, but then again you're not getting this baby-Vulture for 2-bus processing, since it only has one channel and an inferior frequency response! I think it looks like a great idea for guitarists and other single-channel users, and it has a new "Presence" control not found on other units (my guess is that it's most likely a mid-range boosting EQ knob that's tuned to the mid-range frequency of an electric guitar, but that remains to be seen; if it is, then existing units can easily replicate it by boosting the material with an EQ before entering the vulture). Will be interesting to see what price it lands at and how it looks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevlar View Post
The Culture Vulture Solo is a new development of the Vulture recently designed with help from Vic's young protégé Ricky Sharp. There is more of a focus on use with guitar and bass di / amplifier front end applications but the unit also retains all the useful features for line level applications that previous models, including the Limited edition Culture Vulture, offered.

The Culture Vulture Solo is a single channel unit in a 2U 19" rack chassis. It features the ability to switch, via the front panel or a dedicated footswitch, between the Clean and Dirty channels.

The Clean channel is an active channel that provides up to 35dB variable gain to an instrument level signal with a flat but warm sounding frequency response.
The Dirty channel has the Vultures Drive, Distortion type, Bias controls found on a standard Culture Vulture. It also features the PQ positions found on a Limited Edition Culture Vulture and the two Squash positions found on the Mastering and Limited Edition Culture Vultures.
The Dirty channel has a brand new Presence control and a more control over the amount of LPF available.

The rear input connector of the Culture Vulture Solo is unbalanced and semi-floating for improved integration with a DAW setup.

We believe that the Culture Vulture Solo has a greater range in the tonality that can be applied to mono instrument signals than ever before. Providing any signal with warm sounding gain or infinitely adjustable amounts of saturation, distortion and bite.

The valve complement of the Culture Vulture Solo is:

1 ECC83 double triode
1 5725 / 6AS6 single pentode
1 12DW7 / ECC832 double triode

Price TBA
Old 27th October 2011
  #30
Gear Addict
 
Kevlar's Avatar
 



here's the official pic heh
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump