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Home Recording vs. Real Studio - Credibility vs Quality
Old 17th January 2007
  #31
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AlexLakis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by go2go View Post
So.. again.. whats best for JAKE? Wouldnt his "story" and "image" be somewhat refreshing for the pop scene?
Nope. Nobody gives a **** about Jake or his story, and there's an overwhelming chance they never will.

Some kid is sitting in his bedroom somewhere with an Mbox strumming a guitar? What a truly compelling story. Really.

If you wanna sell millions of records, chances are you're gonna have to get on that top 20 wall somehow, at least for a little while, cuz that's what people buy. Not everybody is like us. In fact, most people are not like us. Most people like music, but are not passionate about it. They want to buy what is trendy and cool; What the top 20 tells them to buy. I've wasted too many of my years all ready working at various record stores, both volume-breaking corporate and local. It's the same story with 9/10 customers. Straight to the top 20 wall.

I think it would be best for Jake to start thinking realistically. What is Jake's cost of living? Does he have a family? Does he want to buy a house in the next 5 years? 10 years?

Create a financial plan. Then, weigh money in versus money out. If Jake recorded his "demo" (or whatever, see other thread,) bought a website, put some flyers up around town, started playing local shows, pressed up his own CDs and started selling them at shows, he'll probably wind up in the black in little time at all. If he keeps at it, he can slowly start producing/playing/selling on larger scales. Over time, he can afford to hire things like a manager/booking agent/public relations advisor. Now, all of a sudden, his DIY "story" has merit, as opposed to an unrealistic vision of suddenly "getting signed to a major" out of nowhere. Not that that matters, since the only people who care about that are other local musicians, who have probably all ready spoken with him, seen him live, and bought his album.

This is the reality for 99.9% of "professional" musicians who are making a living doing what they do (this is the goal, right? Or do you just wanna get chicks and be on the cover of Rolling Stone? ) I'm sure Avril Lavigne has a "story." Do I give a **** about it? F*CK NO.

Again, just speaking based on my relatively limited experience and knowledge in the business. Others here are more qualified to comment than I. Nice thread.
Old 17th January 2007
  #32
Make Jake a war orphan who weaseled his way out of an internment camp by singing his songs, a'capella, to the guards, tough guys who nevertheless got kinda choked up and looked the other way while he slipped through the fence.

There's a compelling story.
Old 17th January 2007
  #33
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwittman View Post
I'm not defending major labels, god knows... but the received internet wisdom that it's always bad to sign a record deal is just SILLY.

lots of people make money.
Often MORE money than they would on indies or on their own.
Received internet wisdom? I would say it's more common knowledge and I wouldn't go as far as saying lots of people, at least in regard to musicians. I believe it's more like very few. Most of the ones that do end up making money become an "image" or "product" of some type.

Here's another reference from our dear friend Mr. Albini...

http://negativland.com/albini.html

Yes, you're right if you want a shot at selling a million records, you are going to need the marketing dollars that only a major label can provide and they have to be willing to spend those dollars on your act. But again, we are talking about very few acts indeed.
Old 17th January 2007
  #34
Gear Maniac
 

AT HOME

Jake: Whadda ya think Mom?

Mom: Well.... Ya need to speed up the attack on the compressor...to many "sss"

are getting through. What's the inversion on the C#add9...the intonation

sounds out??? Here. Try this pic. It won't sound so clicky.


...................................................................................................................................
AT THE BIG BAD STUDIO

Producer: Dinner's here

Jake: Great! I'm starvin' !




Ron Allaire, Skyline
Old 17th January 2007
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexLakis View Post
If you wanna sell millions of records, chances are you're gonna have to get on that top 20 wall somehow, at least for a little while, cuz that's what people buy. Not everybody is like us. In fact, most people are not like us. Most people like music, but are not passionate about it. They want to buy what is trendy and cool; What the top 20 tells them to buy. I've wasted too many of my years all ready working at various record stores, both volume-breaking corporate and local. It's the same story with 9/10 customers. Straight to the top 20 wall.
Yes.. absolutely agree. But who tells the customer what is trendy/cool? THE MEDIA. And I am more than convinced that the media will eat Jake's story.. like a little child eats candy. And again, I agree.. it's nothing special these days to be an artist who records in his home studio. But once one of those artists "makes it big", everybody wants to believe they can do it too. Thats the american dream! "Oh... Jake recorded his demo in his bedroom and got signed that way? Wait, I can do that too".

I certainly think that **** gives an artist a whole different credibility and image as opposed to what people are used to in the pop genre. And lets keep in mind... Jake will re-record his songs anyway after he's signed, in a big studio with a big name producer. But what counts is the story that lead up to him getting signed. People want to know that ****. For a fan, music is only important to a certain extreme, at some point they want to connect with the person BEHIND the music. And once they do that, they'll most likely be a fan for life. Love is blind. Music love too!

Why was Avril Lavigne so successful? Because of her music? Maybe.. but mainly cause her record label had a smart marketing plan and presented her as somebody "real", the anti-Britney! Now think about how many records she would've sold if she would actually BE a real artist, despite to only being MARKETED as one.
Old 17th January 2007
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by go2go View Post
Yes.. absolutely agree. But who tells the customer what is trendy/cool? THE MEDIA. And I am more than convinced that the media will eat Jake's story.. like a little child eats candy. And again, I agree.. it's nothing special these days to be an artist who records in his home studio. But once one of those artists "makes it big", everybody wants to believe they can do it too. Thats the american dream! "Oh... Jake recorded his demo in his bedroom and got signed that way? Wait, I can do that too".

I certainly think that **** gives an artist a whole different credibility and image then what people are used to in the pop genre. And lets keep in mind... Jake will re-record his songs anyway after he's signed, in a big studio with a big name producer. But what counts is the story that lead up to him getting signed. People want to know that ****. Why was Avril Lavigne so successful? Because of her music? Maybe.. but mainly cause her record label had a smart marketing plan and presented as somebody "real", the anti-Britney! Now think about how many records she would've sold if she would've actually BEEN a real artist, despite to only being MARKETED as one.
I think you're under the impression that what Jake is trying to do here is new, fresh, or unique. Unfortunately, it is none of those things. It has been done before. Many many times. "The media" isn't going to give a **** about Jake just because he recorded his album at home with an Mbox. Again, if they did, we'd all be rock stars.

It has been done before. Many many times. What is going to set Jake apart from everybody else? What is going to make him unique? Because he gets signed? Uhhh, methinks you're skipping a step or two here...
Old 17th January 2007
  #37
Quote:
Originally Posted by go2go View Post
I find the following a very interesting topic, which I discussed with one of my friends last night who works in the A&R Department of a very big label. Before reading, understand that this is not another home recording vs. real studios discussion. This is rather a quality vs credibility and "best way to get signed" discussion. So please dont let this turn into a flame war between home recording dudes and professional engineers/producers! Thanks...


So here's the deal. Talented solo-artist (lets call him JAKE) knows how to write, arrange and produce songs. He has a nice setup in his bedroom and figured out recording techniques through various educational material (DVDs, books, etc). In fact, he only needs to record guitars and vocals. Everything else will be ITB. Therefore no amazing mic techniques are required anyway. So.... Jake's plan is it to record his demo in his home studio and then let an experienced engineer mix and master the songs.

Why should Jake decide to spend a lot of cash on a real studio, and NOT record in his bedroom? The money is there, Jake could easily afford to rent out a huge studio, etc.. but he also understands that image is important these days, probably more important than the quality of the recording production, at least when it comes to getting signed... and the story of the kid who recorded his songs all alone by himself in his bedroom will most likely sell better than the one of the kid who hired a professional producer, engineer, studio musicians, etc.

A major label will pick up anything that has a story, a buzz and marketability... keeping that in mind, isnt Jake better off deciding against a real studio? (Given that he'll be able to attract the attention of every major label anyway!)

Post your thoughts fellas. Curious what you think!
Traditionally in the UK, the A&R person will mess things up. worried about their own job on the line, they will want to nominate a hit maker person to record what the artist has done.. to do it 'properly' -

Just before all this happens.. the manager has to be 'flipped' - the record co will erode the confidence of the manager in the artists own abilities.. He may have walked in to the record co convinced that the artist has the skills to take charge of their own record, but halfway through... the manager, hypnotized by A&R mooks paranoia, starts to share the opinion that perhaps the talented artist DOES need a producer..

...THAT my friends is where the rot sets in.. because the one person supposed to be looking after the artist - the manager - gets conned too

what can happen then is they all embark on an endless " album studio tour" where they waste a lot of money - force the artist to co produce with people he doesn't really want to co produce with and to use studios and engineers he can probably very easily beat with his self refined recording chops at home.

End result - total music biz nightmare journey for artist. Over budget album, fired A&R person, dropped artist.....

Er........MySpace anyone?

Old 17th January 2007
  #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexLakis View Post
I think you're under the impression that what Jake is trying to do here is new, fresh, or unique. Unfortunately, it is none of those things. It has been done before. Many many times. "The media" isn't going to give a **** about Jake just because he recorded his album at home with an Mbox. Again, if they did, we'd all be rock stars.
You need to pay attention to what I say. He wont record his album with a Mbox. Only his demo, and even that should be recorded with better gear. You dont seem to get the overall big picture of this... cause again, the media WANTS a story, and NEEDS one to sell an artist. And they'd certainly give a **** about how Jake got signed, and how he created a buzz around himself. How you get signed is the foundation of every artist's image... cause once you get big, people will dig in your past and figure out whether you are for real or not!
Old 17th January 2007
  #39
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AlexLakis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by go2go View Post
You need to pay attention to what I say. He wont record his album with a Mbox. Only his demo, and even that should be recorded with better gear. You dont seem to get the overall big picture of this... cause again, the media WANTS a story, and NEEDS one to sell an artist. And they'd certainly give a **** about how Jake got signed, and how he created a buzz around himself. How you get signed is the foundation of every artist's image... cause once you get big, people will dig in your past and figure out whether you are for real or not!
I am listening to what you're saying (the Mbox obviously isn't the point.) However, you are using ends to justify means. You still haven't answered the question that your entire point is based around:

HOW IS HE GONNA GET SIGNED IN THE FIRST PLACE?

Based on the fact that he got signed all ready?
Old 17th January 2007
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexLakis View Post
I am listening to what you're saying (the Mbox obviously isn't the point.) However, you are using ends to justify means. You still haven't answered the question that your entire point is based around:

HOW IS HE GONNA GET SIGNED IN THE FIRST PLACE?

Based on the fact that he got signed all ready?
We just assume that he will. The discussion is not based around whether or not you CAN get signed with a home recording demo.. cause we all know that it is possible.
Old 17th January 2007
  #41
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And if I may add. I certainly believe that no A&R will turn down an artist just because he thinks the demo isnt perfect (production wise). If it's a good/clean recording, has been mixed properly, then it makes no difference to the A&R person. If it DOES, he is in the wrong business.

Of course you cant expect EVERY A&R person to hear a hit on a simple vocal/acoustic guitar demo, which contains a lot of hiss and stuff like that. But if the production is decent, the song is fully arranged and recorded, then it wont matter if it's perfect or not. If it's a hit, they'll hear it.

Listen to "The Kilers" demos for instance.
Old 17th January 2007
  #42
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AlexLakis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by go2go View Post
We just assume that he will. The discussion is not based around whether or not you CAN get signed with a home recording demo.. cause we all know that it is possible.
Gotcha. Didn't realize we were assuming that, I thought that was part of what we were trying to achieve. Apologies!

I wouldn't say it's impossible, to get signed based on a home demo, but that 99.9% figure might apply here as well.

This has been a great thread with some great responses. Kudos! thumbsup
Old 17th January 2007
  #43
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Crash's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronzie View Post
AT HOME

Jake: Whadda ya think Mom?

Mom: Well.... Ya need to speed up the attack on the compressor...to many "sss"

are getting through. What's the inversion on the C#add9...the intonation

sounds out??? Here. Try this pic. It won't sound so clicky.


...................................................................................................................................
AT THE BIG BAD STUDIO

Producer: Dinner's here

Jake: Great! I'm starvin' !




Ron Allaire, Skyline
I peed my pants with laughter reading that! Too funny.
Old 17th January 2007
  #44
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The bottom line.

If Jake isn't very attractive and between 20-26, he is wasn't his time. Totally wasting his time.

The music industry only cares about this because it has been proven, every day, that the popular music scene is driven by looks and marketability. Talent can be hired. The Matrix will write for anyone with enough money and that has been proven to be enough. If he can carry a tune - just barely carry a tune - and is great looking, he'll be fine. I honestly don't think the industry cares if you write anymore. It only cares about what can sell. Some average dude in his average bedroom writing great songs will NEVER have an audience. The Matrix however, has proved that they have the right formula. If an A&R can follow a formula that has worked with less downside risk, then there you go. This is an "american idol" market. Fame has always been about image. And if you don't have it, the greatest 12 song collection in 30 years will go ignored.

My .02
Old 17th January 2007
  #45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules View Post
Just before all this happens.. the manager has to be 'flipped' - the record co will erode the confidence of the manager in the artists own abilities.. He may have walked in to the record co convinced that the artist has the skills to take charge of their own record, but halfway through... the manager, hypnotized by A&R mooks paranoia, starts to share the opinion that perhaps the talented artist DOES need a producer..

...THAT my friends is where the rot sets in.. because the one person supposed to be looking after the artist - the manager - gets conned too

what can happen then is they all embark on an endless " album studio tour" where they waste a lot of money - force the artist to co produce with people he doesn't really want to co produce with and to use studios and engineers he can probably very easily beat with his self refined recording chops at home.

End result - total music biz nightmare journey for artist. Over budget album, fired A&R person, dropped artist.....

Er........MySpace anyone?

thanks Jules

reading this reminds me how lucky i was getting to do my thing my way - doesn't happen on a major! what a horrible and familiar clusterf*uck scenario.

so glad to be out of the biz. i work in a brutal place now, but the music industry makes it look positively humane
Old 17th January 2007
  #46
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Hi!
Interesting thread....may I be a little invasive and hijack slightly?

Let's take a different story, but similar to Jake. Let's call this guy "Steve," and have him living in California about 20+ years ago. Let's give him some inside connections in "the industry," and give him a bit over $10k to put a down-payment on a house and maybe grab some gear and construction costs. And let's give him the ability to borrow some gear from friends...all of this instead of selling away his true rights, and the freedom to express himself as he sees fit.

Or, he could use those same connections, and the cash, to begin a journey of using a "big name studio" and using "name brand" engineers and producers; and sell away bits and pieces of himself in a grand effort to make a very special set of recordings.

Sorry, but I feel there is a time and place for everything. If I could afford to pay an engineer to sit behind the gear and do his/her magic, and if I truly trusted them, sure; I have friends with credits who fit this bill nicely. Producer? Same as the latter, but x100 on being so very sure it was a good move, and the right to ignore tham at any point.

Some of us do have the talent, and some simply need "a little help from our friends." The problem is being able to step outside oneself and truly discern if they ARE what they think. I know my engineering skills and pristine ears are lacking compared to others I know. And I have friends I would call on in a heartbeat to help me. But my art is my art, and I would rather be true and sell 1 copy than sell 1 million and sacrifice even one percent of one ounce of that vision. And I think that is where people will differ: some see it purely as self-expressed art, while others see it as performance of art, with the art in that case being constructed FOR the performance. Or, maybe it is simply what one's ultimate goal is. For me, and many others, selling a boatload of albums would be nice, but most important is getting vision from head to "tape."

By the way- "Steve" did quite well, retained his vision, and from what I gather, was very happy with the results. I have an original pressing in my collection, a copy on CD, and was inspired enough by the story 20 years ago to follow my own dreams. Side-tracks, tragedy, mistakes galore, experienced "major label" BS, walked away, walked back, and in the end, have little to show...except experience...and alot of cool memories, and a big smile. "Steve" is doing well too; his first album did ok. Granted he is a wicked exception to the rule. As an inspiration to opt for self-discovery before selling away- worked for me.
Old 17th January 2007
  #47
Gear Nut
 

How is Jake going to be marketed? Who is his target audience? If it is the same people who buy Avril Lavigne's stuff, then who records his demo does not really matter much. The music and image need to be a fit for the intended target audience.
Old 17th January 2007
  #48
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bunnerabb's Avatar
Quote:
Er........MySpace anyone?
God, no.
Old 17th January 2007
  #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bunnerabb View Post
God, no.
Well but MySpace is the biggest platform for artists these days. Most majors even have special staff who do nothing else but browse MySpace all day long to find the next big thing.
Old 17th January 2007
  #50
Gear Nut
 

DIYer Maker

i disagree with several of the previous posts. i think that there is a story angle to be exploited by Jake having recorded his album in his bedroom. If Jake has great songs and enough production savvy to get the most out of his recording environment and gear, i believe that there is a significant percentage of people out there who would latch on to that. Everyone on this board knows that the home studio market has been growing at an exponential rate and the truth is, people want to hear a success story. Something that will inspire them to press on. Something to keep their own dreams alive. If Jake can write the songs that make the whole world sing, he probably has some degree of depth to his story already and a homemade album of reasonable fidelity will only benefit his legend. He's ready to stand next to Fugazi, Ani DiFranco, and Sir Millard Mulch in the elite ranks of...wait...nope...never mind...

Jake isn't going to do that. Jake has decided only to record the DEMO in his bedroom studio. For some reason, his agent thinks there's going to be some wild public interest in an unreleased bedroom studio demo. Jake needs to fire this shmuck.
Old 17th January 2007
  #51
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bunnerabb's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by quietdrive View Post
Well but MySpace is the biggest platform for artists these days. Most majors even have special staff who do nothing else but browse MySpace all day long to find the next big thing.

Huh... anybody get singed and released from there?

Seriously. I haven't kept up with that. the whole
place just looks like a lot of bad web pages, to me.
Old 17th January 2007
  #52
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sneezebomb View Post
i disagree with several of the previous posts. i think that there is a story angle to be exploited by Jake having recorded his album in his bedroom.
I have to disagree with this. For 95% of the music-buying audience today, the recording process is totally opaque. If you try to talk to them about where something was recorded or what kind of gear was used, you will just get a blank stare. It makes no impression on them at all one way or the other.

The one overriding factor is probably the thing that one of the first posters on the thread hit on: labels don't invest in artists or recordings these days, except for their most popular acts. They want new acts to walk in the door with a ready-for-release disc in hand, a tour all planned, and a promotional package wrapped up and ready to go (all at the artist's expense, of course). All the label has to do is slap their logo on it, and take their cut.

Having said all that, I agree with a lot of the other posters that maybe trying to get signed by a major isn't necessarily the best career move for Jake. A better move might be to produce a record independently (either in a great garage studio or a decent-but-not-top-notch commercial studio), do the college circuit, sign with a small label, and build the buzz. Then, after the buzz is already built, go to the major label and work out a distribution deal.
Old 17th January 2007
  #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bunnerabb View Post
Huh... anybody get singed and released from there?
OF COURSE.. do you live on this planet? More bands get signed via MySpace right now than anything else. The internet is the way to get signed nowadays. And I know a lot of guys may not agree, or like this.. but its true. Nobody cares about your silly gigs anymore, where you plan in front of 10 people. The internet is the way to go. You can reach hundreds of people in minutes.

Watch out for Hollywood Undead. They were signed simply by the buzz they created on MySpace. No live shows, nothing. Just an internet following. They gonna come out this spring/summer on MySpace / Interscope Records. YES.. MySpace has its own label!!! And that band is gonna make a HUGE impact. Mark my words on that. They'll take hip hop to a new level. Especially since Hip Hop is becoming a parody of its own right now and thats exactly what Hollywood Undead exploit with their image and songs.
Old 17th January 2007
  #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cornutt View Post
I have to disagree with this. For 95% of the music-buying audience today, the recording process is totally opaque. If you try to talk to them about where something was recorded or what kind of gear was used, you will just get a blank stare. It makes no impression on them at all one way or the other.
Thats not even how you should exploit this whole thing.. it should be on another level. And I too see a lot of marketability in this. Most people on here probably disagree because to them home recording is nothing new, or special. But for the public it is. Jake may very well be able to have a unique story with this, even though it may not be unique..
Old 17th January 2007
  #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cornutt View Post

The one overriding factor is probably the thing that one of the first posters on the thread hit on: labels don't invest in artists or recordings these days, except for their most popular acts. They want new acts to walk in the door with a ready-for-release disc in hand, a tour all planned, and a promotional package wrapped up and ready to go (all at the artist's expense, of course). All the label has to do is slap their logo on it, and take their cut.
Thats plain bull****. I dont know who you guys get these information from but labels invest a ****LOAD of money in pretty much every act they sign. Pretty much every artist thats on a major (whether they are commercially successful or not) gets his songs mixed by a big mixing engineer. That alone is an investment of 100k, if not more. Not including recording and mastering!!!

Its true that artist development these days is not as "popular" as it used to be, but even thats not true. If a label believes in an artist, they'll develop him/her. Just one example --> Samantha Moore (www.myspace.com/samanthamooremusic), signed to Interscope. Her manager is the same dude that got Avril Lavigne signed, Cliff Fabri. Samantha was signed in 2003! Her record will drop this year. That's over 4 years of artist development!!


EDIT: And the story of "They want new acts to walk in the door with a ready-for-release disc in hand" is pure crap because labels will have you re-record the songs anyway. Why? THEY WANT TO OWN THE MASTERS! If they dont own the masters, they dont own your ass, and if they dont own your ass they basically have nothing. In that case they would work for YOU. But they cant work for you, thats not how labels make their money. YOU need to work for THEM. Its either that way or the highway..
Old 17th January 2007
  #56
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bunnerabb's Avatar
Quote:
Do you live on this planet?
Technically.

Although 7 months out of the year it's on a small island mixing two shows a day.

Roosevelt could be in office for all I know.
Old 17th January 2007
  #57
Gear Nut
 

You have to be professional all aound period. Have a great lawyer,have great confidence i yourself,make sure your music is as good as you can make it but also your music has a feel where mass amounts of people will also like it. Its a business music is a product now a days. you make a good product or catchy product that has a potential to sell. Yu wn covince the record comany that you can make them alot of money. HAHA MONEY MONEY keyword.i if they see your music"product" will make them alot of money, you will get signed, make sure you look really good that day too ,it will help
Old 17th January 2007
  #58
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dcisive's Avatar
 

While it can go either way at times, I'll recount an experience I had regarding something along these lines.

Many years ago (circa 1980) I dated a gal that was a personal friend of Stevie Nicks. Fleetwood Mac was on tour and she was asked by Stevie to join her on tour in Denver Colorado. While they were on tour, Stevie happened to hook up with Don Henley (who of course at the time was wildly popular with the Eagles and also was romantically involved with Stevie).

With those details out of the way, I'll get to the good stuff. Stevie was with Don Henley in a hotel suite and they hooked up a little Sony cassette deck with a half way decent mic and recorded just a acoustic guitar, Stevie and Don's voice doing what would later be known as "Leather and Lace". Along with several other songs with Stevie at the piano alone. This girlfriend of mine brought this tape home for me to hear as it became a gift from Stevie to her.

I only let a handful of folks hear it, and it blew them ALL away. Including myself I might add. The shear sexual energy portrayed by their raw rendition of "Leather and Lace" NEVER.....I repeat NEVER translated to the final production of it which made it to her solo album some time later. So it IS possible to have a raw non commercially recorded product have an impact. I still remarkably have this tape in my possession. No doubt if Stevie knew it she'd go bonkers. It is very special indeed and just further illustrates that IMHO it's 75% the performance and the other 25% is the engineer's job. Many if not most will disagree.......there ya have it. Now I have to go dig this tape up and enjoy it one more time....
Old 17th January 2007
  #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcisive View Post
It is very special indeed and just further illustrates that IMHO it's 75% the performance and the other 25% is the engineer's job. Many if not most will disagree.......there ya have it. Now I have to go dig this tape up and enjoy it one more time....
Oh I looove this. Most guys will hate your guts man

And absorb this:
A crappy musician will make you as a producer or engineer look bad, but a great musician will make you look amazing. So who's really adding the biggest percentage to the end result here?
Old 17th January 2007
  #60
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Of the artists around me that got signed to REAL recording deals by heavy hitters in the last couple - none of them had a name producer/engineer/ or even a worthy studio.

The only thing they all had in common is that they got their product into the right hands of people who knew the right people. The thing you have to understand is that the label doesn't know what they want until they hear it.

This trancends the hype & the production. If you "have it" you'll get it. The rest is just excuses.
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