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How does equipment stay up in a rack?
Old 16th January 2007
  #1
Gear Nut
 

How does equipment stay up in a rack?

I built myself a custom rack the other day. All really nice hardwood glued to ****, really durable. It's basically a wood box. And then on one open end, about half an inch inside, I stuck a block of hardwood on each side. These served as my rack rails. They are also tacked and glued in and overall it looks NICE!

But more importantly...how should I go about mounting my equipment? I can drill holes in the wood rails, get some bolts and nuts and run a bolt from the front through the equipment, the rail, and then into a nut on the back. It just seems to me that this would warp the rack ears on my gear overtime.

Any suggestions?
Old 16th January 2007
  #2
......

you didn't want to use standard 19" rack rails & screws?

am i missing something?

..
Attached Images
How does equipment stay up in a rack?-rackrail.jpg 
Old 16th January 2007
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Acoustic Cloud's Avatar
 

Hmmm

Rack gear isnt 18 inches deep like it was in the 80s, nor is it as heavy. Your ears arent going to warp any more with rack rail, than they would using wood to mount the gear into.

Like Sqye said, it seems we are missing something in your question...
Old 16th January 2007
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Rack ears are made strong enough to hild the equipment so don't worry about that.

What I would worry about is screwing directly to wood! The wood may overtime wear and your gear will start to droop until the strain will cause a possible domino effect and evrything comes down.

So unless I misunderstood use metal angle mounts (as illustrated above) securily mounted to your rack.

jim
Old 16th January 2007
  #5
Gear Guru
How does equipment stay up in a rack?

Viagra?


Sorry.
Old 16th January 2007
  #6
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Acoustic Cloud's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluzzi View Post
Rack ears are made strong enough to hild the equipment so don't worry about that.

What I would worry about is screwing directly to wood! The wood may overtime wear and your gear will start to droop until the strain will cause a possible domino effect and evrything comes down.

So unless I misunderstood use metal angle mounts (as illustrated above) securily mounted to your rack.

jim
If you screw gear directly into good quality wood, it wont sag, unless you move the gear around alot, and the holes get schloppy.

Besides, he is worried about the ears themselves tweaking.... I have never heard anyone worry about that.
Old 16th January 2007
  #7
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by gutsofgold View Post
I built myself a custom rack the other day. All really nice hardwood glued to ****, really durable. It's basically a wood box. And then on one open end, about half an inch inside, I stuck a block of hardwood on each side. These served as my rack rails. They are also tacked and glued in and overall it looks NICE!

But more importantly...how should I go about mounting my equipment? I can drill holes in the wood rails, get some bolts and nuts and run a bolt from the front through the equipment, the rail, and then into a nut on the back. It just seems to me that this would warp the rack ears on my gear overtime.

Any suggestions?
No need to worry about the ears.
I did something similar years ago, using 2x2 white pine wood as my rails. (used to be a cabinet maker)
It worked fine, however it was only holding some light weight effects units.

Your best bet would be to remove the wood, and use normal rack rails as others have suggested.
If your wood rails are already "glued on", and you don't want to deal with removing them (sawzall, router, scraper, belt sander....)
Aproach it like this.
Drill your holes all the way through the rails, slightly larger than your machine screws, and use t-nuts in the back.
The t-nut accepts the machine screw, and has "teeth" around the outside so it permentally stays in place without having to [email protected] around with a loose nut in the back everytime you wnat to remove something.
Without seeing what you have built, there is no way to know how much weight the wood rails will take before warping or splitting.....
Keep the heavy stuff near the bottom (lol)
Good luck Brotha!
Old 16th January 2007
  #8
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Berolzheimer's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PRobb View Post
Viagra?


Sorry.
I really didn't want to say it, it's totally innapropriate for this forum, to talk about a P..pp.p.pp....nah, I can't say it here....

P..p..p..pe... Ne....

Nope, not here, even if it's handed to me in a thread title like that.
Old 16th January 2007
  #9
Lives for gear
 

Rack rails tend to connect all the chassis together, and might encourage ground loops.

Instead of screwing into wood, I would suggest drilling and bolting, with nylon washers under steel washers. Use nylock nuts.

I used to own some of that 1980's rack rubble that was about 6' long, and none of the ears ever bent on me.

The more stuff you add, the stronger it gets.
Old 16th January 2007
  #10
13030
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by PRobb View Post
Viagra?


Sorry.

Ciallis is better.

Quicker..ahem...'response' time, but won't keep the 'wood' as long as Viagra.
Old 16th January 2007
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwiburger View Post
Rack rails tend to connect all the chassis together, and might encourage ground loops.

Instead of screwing into wood, I would suggest drilling and bolting, with nylon washers under steel washers. Use nylock nuts.
Most of my bolts have plastic washers between them and the units, others don't have any washers (on items which I'm not worried about minor rack-rash). Are ground loops a big issue here, cause I've not heard of this before as a 'must do'?

Back on topic, I built a wooden rack about 7 years ago where I screwed or bolted the units direct into the timber. Its much faster and cheaper to erect, if you just want something 'throw-away'. Mine looked a bit shoddy, but was very sturdy. To attach the units with screws, drill just a very small holes in the wood where your screws will go in, so they have a 'track' to bite to as they go in, and use good thick wood screws with a washer at the front. Alternatively, and if the units are heavy, better to drill a clean hole right through the wood and use nuts and bolts, with wide washers at the back between the wood and the nuts. In fact, I'd recommend re-inforcing the whole rack with some screws and brackets instead relying on glue.
Old 16th January 2007
  #12
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by PRobb View Post
Viagra?


Sorry.
Rubbish! Little rack-elves hold the back of the equipment up with their little fingers. I thought everyone knew that!
Old 16th January 2007
  #13
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djui5's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acoustic Cloud View Post
If you screw gear directly into good quality wood, it wont sag, unless you move the gear around alot, and the holes get schloppy.

That's what they did to the racks at Transcon, screwed the gear right into the wood rails. Works great.
Old 16th January 2007
  #14
Lives for gear
 

It doesn't keep me up at night but I do sort of wonder...

I have a 4 space rackmounted computer that weighs a crapload. How the hell does that thing stay right with just 4 little screws into those rack-rails?
Old 16th January 2007
  #15
Lives for gear
 
djui5's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by redddog View Post
IHow the hell does that thing stay right with just 4 little screws into those rack-rails?

It's an Engineering marvel...
Old 17th January 2007
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by PRobb View Post
Viagra?


Sorry.
lol
Old 17th January 2007
  #17
when i built my first studio, i had my gear mounted
in custom built wood frame racks, onto recessed wood rails.

it just got messy after a while, because i was always moving gear.

i still have some of those ancient giant heavy monster death road cases
in my garage, from my touring days, as well.

now i always use metal rack rails.

i also insulate with plastic washers on both sides of the rail,
(which can be a little tricky)
and keep all my power separated from my audio in back of the racks.

generally, i've found this to be fine. no problems with ground loops, at all.

best of luck.

..
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