The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
attention: UK slutz
Old 13th January 2007
  #1
Lives for gear
 
ersheff's Avatar
 

attention: UK slutz

Hi, all.
It's quite late (early?) here in Wisconsin right now. Almost 7:00am and I haven't slept yet, so bare with me if I sound loony.
I'm a 25-year-old audio geek finishing up a music education degree. A year and a half ago, the wind ensemble from my school (University of Wisconsin-Whitewater) was invited to play at an international festival in Manchester at Royal Northern. We spent a few days in Manchester and a few days in Edinburgh, and since then I've been seriously considering a return trip, possibly an extended (permanent?) one.
I'm supposed to get my degree in a year, and I'm still not really sure what I want to do yet. I DO know that as of now, getting a teaching job in Wisconsin is not the first thing on my list.
So I've been bouncing some other options around in my head. One of those is to perhaps do post graduate studies in the UK. I noticed that the University of Edinburgh has some intersting post graduate music options, including sound design and acoustics and music technology (note that this is just from a peak at their website- I have no idea what their program or facilities are like). I could maybe even teach music for a few years in the UK. Most teachers don't stay at their very first job, so it would be practical to teach there for a few years and then come back to the states if I so desire. Then, there's also the slutty prospects!
Any advice from UK slutz? How is the music education in public schools? Any of you been there recently or have kids in those programs now? In the states, the schools get less and less money every year, especially for the arts. Lots of teachers I've been talking to lately are doing twice the work they used to do for the same pay because funding keeps getting cut!
On the other topic, do any of you know anything about good university music programs with a heavy technology emphasis? I'm not necessarily looking for a "recording school". I'm interested in composition and other sound design as well.
Lastly, where are the recording studios? Is getting into the recording business in the UK like it is in the states? Does every Joe with a laptop and 002 advertise himself as an engineer and producer with a studio?
Just rolling some thoughts around. I'm guessing that some of you UK slutz were originally from the states yourselves, so any special info you can share would be great.
Thanks!
Old 13th January 2007
  #2
Lives for gear
Hey, some information is in my "Scottish Studios" topic that's just been moved into this forum.

The music that's taught in schools might not be to your fancy - but i would contact and research and see.. I've only ever been to one High School here!

University - the only one that i'd recommend is Paisley Univsersity (soon to be called West Of Scotland Uni). That's the one i am at, and i chose it for the fact that it's driven by Music (and the technology of).

Worth checking out their site .. http://www.paisley.ac.uk/
My best mate is looking into going to Edinburgh, but like you, i haven't seen their facilities - but i hope to change this soon!
Old 13th January 2007
  #3
Lives for gear
 
RichT's Avatar
 

Our assistant engineer Neil (that's twice I've said that this week) attended Rose Bruford College in London following a programme setup by guys at Manchester University.

It was pretty good on the technology side and as far as I know Neil got a shed load of studio and 'play' time on the course.

He's on the forum here as 'nellypan', why not drop him a PM?

Cheers,
Rich
Old 13th January 2007
  #4
Gear Nut
 

A lot of questions to answer so here goes:

Firstly, schools are a mess here generally. However, some schools specialise in music and some of those are very very good. A good example is Chetham's School of Music in Manchester. Basically a school for grooming talented young people for attending the Royal Northern College of Music or the University of Manchester or both. I'd imagine getting a teaching position in that type of school would not be easy.

As for Universities, it greatly depends on your interests. RNCM has good postgraduate programmes in more traditional composition and performance. Univ. of Manchester has an interesting masters in electroacoustics with the BEAST system to play with. Birmingham with the MANTIS and York (I think) have similar programmes and facilities. Queens University in Belfast has some incredible resources now too and is at an exciting time. Finally, University of Sussex in Brighton has a good modern music department with excellent staff. All of these are well respected, as is the more technical acoustics options at Salford.

You should consider the each cities merits especially the music environment. To this end, Manchester is second only to london and punches way above it's weight across the board (bands, nightclubs, record labels, radio, gigs, DIY attitude, affordability, universities, festivals) and that's why I chose it. Edinburgh is very much second to glasgow in terms of active music scenes but there's enough to get by. Brighton is small but decent as is Belfast. Birmingham and York, I don't know, certainly don't seem to be as active or exciting as the others.

Finally, did you look at the institute of sonologie in the Hague. Very interesting if you are interested in the electronic end of the spectrum. Probably much cheaper in terms of fees and living costs than the U.K. and the language barrier isn't too much of an issue for work or study.
Old 13th January 2007
  #5
Lives for gear
Sorry folks, but it's cold bucket of water time!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mopppish View Post
How is the music education in public schools? Any of you been there recently or have kids in those programs now? In the states, the schools get less and less money every year, especially for the arts. Lots of teachers I've been talking to lately are doing twice the work they used to do for the same pay because funding keeps getting cut!
It's far worse here. Many schools have dropped musical education completely, so it is not unusual for kids coming into the studio to be confronted by structures, middle-eights, progressions etc. for the first time. My last two interns came from the US and I was amazed at how much better their background education in music was, compared to here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mopppish View Post
On the other topic, do any of you know anything about good university music programs with a heavy technology emphasis? I'm not necessarily looking for a "recording school". I'm interested in composition and other sound design as well.
There are a handful that form a kind of Mafia. Surrey Uni is the only viable career path for music tech and for music there are the Royal Acadamey, Royal College and Guildhall School of Music. I know that all sorts of people will disagree bitterly here, but those are the colleges that people go to who actually run a real risk of having a career in music.

Yes, I do know that there are all these other places like Trinity and LIPA and every college out there offers some sort of music tech course, but I just am going by the people who get paid by producers and labels to walk into a studio to work. As Howard said, I can call 'em like I see 'em!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mopppish View Post
Lastly, where are the recording studios? Is getting into the recording business in the UK like it is in the states? Does every Joe with a laptop and 002 advertise himself as an engineer and producer with a studio?
In a word, yes!

The city studios are all struggling against wildly inflated property prices and a falling CD market, the 'destination ' studios have to really be up to top standard to survive and the bottom-feeders are all pretending to have business that just is not there. London has a handful of large rooms and maybe 15 good medium sized rooms, there are just four or five destination studios in the UK and another 20 or so medium sized rooms and one or two large rooms, like Real World, outside London that are of 1st class standard.

If you draw the line between demo room and medium sized room at large analogue desk and 800 sq ft of recording space with a full concert grand, then the UK has perhaps 30 studios, maybe even fewer.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump