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Is it essential to use a reamp box when reamping?
Old 14th February 2013
  #1
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kevin nowhow's Avatar
 

Is it essential to use a reamp box when reamping?

I have been gradually wondering about this since we're about to start recording with my band.I know the theory concerning reamping as well as wwhat means to have impedance mismatches but i don't have a reamper yet.No one that i know of has one either.Does it really make or break your sound a decision to proceed with such a box or not?I've previously sent synths to guitar stompboxes with cable lengths of up to 2 meters & sounded fine.Any thoughts?
Thanx!
Old 14th February 2013
  #2
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Depends on if the stomp box or amp you send to from an interface is capable of handling line level without distortion, or maybe you like the distortion or how it changes the tone.

Keyboard amps are made for line level low imp. Guitar/bass amps are made for hi imp, lower instrument level.

Reamp box takes line level low imp and changes it to inst level high impedance. If reamping a guitar track to a guit amp, line level into the amp will add overdrive like a guitar dist pedal does and the imp mismatch will change the tone.
Old 14th February 2013
  #3
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Silent Sound's Avatar
I don't think it's necessary. I don't use a reamp box, and everything sounds just fine to me. I will say, however, that by not using a reamp box, you will have to lower the output of the signal on your interface, and maybe even EQ it a bit to get it to sound more natural. I find that by not using a reamp box, the guitar signal going into the amp tends to have more high frequency content that you may or may not want.

In any case, I don't think it's mandatory at all. I can, however, be a much simpler and more convenient solution than having to readjust your volume and EQ before hitting the amp or pedals. But no, it's not mandatory.
Old 14th February 2013
  #4
Gear Addict
 

this depends very much on which amp (or fx device) you're using for the reamping ... there's a whole lot of applications where it doesn't make a difference, any amp that has inputs accepting line-level signals (and are not too sensitive when it comes to impedance / loading) can be used without a reamp box easily: Twin Reverb, JC-120, pretty much every bass amp etc etc.
just the same for the classic sansamp boxes: Tchad Blake said he does all his sansamp magic WITHOUT any reamping ...

there is however amps like AC-30s or any Matchless amp which are very sensitive and where the magic lies in the interplay between the magnetic pickups and the input stage of the amp, these definitely do need a instrument-level, hi-impedance input signal so you need a reamping device. same for fuzz boxes, especially vintage-style germanium transistor ones.
Old 15th February 2013
  #5
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Thank you all for your input!I think i'll be able to test it for myself afterall.Found someone who is willing to let me borrow it for a couple of days so i'll get my hands dirty.Cheerz!
Old 17th February 2013
  #6
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If you have a passive DI, using adapters, just run it backwards. Obviously the better the DI, the better the tone. Unfortunately this won't work with an active DI.
Old 18th February 2013
  #7
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kevin nowhow's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FireBros. View Post
If you have a passive DI, using adapters, just run it backwards. Obviously the better the DI, the better the tone. Unfortunately this won't work with an active DI.
Why is that?Is it because of phantom power requirements?
Old 18th February 2013
  #8
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kneelie's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by FireBros. View Post
If you have a passive DI, using adapters, just run it backwards. Obviously the better the DI, the better the tone. Unfortunately this won't work with an active DI.
Some work that way some don't. It is best to check the manual.
Old 19th February 2013
  #9
It's not essential but it is much better. I did without for a while, then used a passive DI in reverse, but getting a dedicated reamp box (not too expensive) made for much better results. It has level control, polarity switch and earth loop and it just sounds more like a guitarist is playing.
Old 19th February 2013
  #10
Gear Addict
It's best to use a reamp to maintain correct impedance loadings. The preamp stage of an amplifier or stomp box might react to the lower impedance.

You can use a DI in reverse like the Radial ProDI. You'll just need to lower the signal coming into the DI because it'll come in really hot. Also you may need a female-female xlr to come off the output into the DI. Or your output may be TRS in which case you just need a XLR-F/TRS cable.
Old 8th March 2013
  #11
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I recently found some information about using buffered pedals as reampers to correct impedance mismatches.What i don't get is this:Since such a pedal sees high impedance at its input, lowering Z after outputting, isn't this the opposite of what i want to achieve(low Z line output=>high Z amp input)???
Old 8th March 2013
  #12
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What you want to achieve is good sound. Don't worry about impedances unless you have a problem that impedance may address. Well, guitar input impedances anyway. Definitely worry about it with speakers and such!

There are lots of things I've tried over the years that are supposed to sound great. And perhaps they did for other people. For instance, I'd don't like Recorderman setups or ribbon mics for overheads, yet people rave about them all the time. I'm also not a big M/S fan, but others are. I don't worry about the input impedance on my guitar amps, because I can make a pretty good guitar sound with the equipment that I have. I'm sure it would be quicker to get a good guitar sound with a reamp box, but I've got other places to spend my money on at the moment.

So my advice would be to just use what you got. Experiment with different setups and see if it works for you. If it's not quite getting you to where you want to go, then try a reamp box and see what that does for you.
Old 9th March 2013
  #13
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kevin nowhow's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent Sound View Post
What you want to achieve is good sound. Don't worry about impedances unless you have a problem that impedance may address. Well, guitar input impedances anyway. Definitely worry about it with speakers and such!

There are lots of things I've tried over the years that are supposed to sound great. And perhaps they did for other people. For instance, I'd don't like Recorderman setups or ribbon mics for overheads, yet people rave about them all the time. I'm also not a big M/S fan, but others are. I don't worry about the input impedance on my guitar amps, because I can make a pretty good guitar sound with the equipment that I have. I'm sure it would be quicker to get a good guitar sound with a reamp box, but I've got other places to spend my money on at the moment.

So my advice would be to just use what you got. Experiment with different setups and see if it works for you. If it's not quite getting you to where you want to go, then try a reamp box and see what that does for you.
I actually stand by what you say.But thing is, it's not just sound i worry about.I've heard people saying they have fried their amps/stompboxes because of level/impedance mismatches.Others saying there's no danger whatsoever.I'm confused because of my lack of experience.I can get by with a fried stomp but an amp that doesn't belong to me...that's another story.

I have an impedance matching transformer going from low Z(600ohms) to high Z(30kohms).Still not the 1Mohms guitars love but was wondering if it can be of any use...along with careful level treatment...
Old 9th March 2013
  #14
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...plus the guy who was willing to lend me his reamper, sold it without saying so.So much for testing... :(
Old 9th March 2013
  #15
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I would try running the output at low volume, use a TRS-XLR with a low z to high z XLR-TS adapter into your amp. It will prob work fine.
Old 2nd January 2017
  #16
Here for the gear
 

Hi all I want connect external guitar pedals to use with vst s that I have on my daw would a reamp box allow me to do this or would I need another method
Old 2nd January 2017
  #17
I run a passive DI in reverse with a -30dB pad inline. Works fine.
Old 5th January 2017
  #18
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin nowhow View Post
Why is that?Is it because of phantom power requirements?
No.

It's because amplifier circuits don't work backwards and what makes an active DI active is a buffer amp circuit.
Old 5th January 2017
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kneelie View Post
Some work that way some don't. It is best to check the manual.
No. No active DI works reversed. See the previous post.
Old 5th January 2017
  #20
Gear Maniac
 
przemak's Avatar
The most important thing is ground isolation. Connecting ground of a computer with switching power supply and ground of the tube amp is a bad idea - sometimes it may work, but more often there is heavy buzz
The second thing is level - sometimes cheap -10dBV interfaces are too quiet to drive an amp with the level the real guitar can. Using reampbox which lowers this level is in this case a bad idea, and most reampboxes can only lower the level. So +4 interface and transformer is what you need to get it done properly
I make a reampbox/dibox (quite popular here ) and I found that with -10dBV interfaces one have to lower the level from guitar to interface and boost the level going from interface to an amp, and this means more noise.
Anyway - without ground lift it won't work as a rule.
Old 5th January 2017
  #21
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przemak's Avatar
And forget about "impedance mismatch", there is no such a thing in reamping
Old 5th January 2017
  #22
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It's not necessary but it certainly makes for a better recording. Once I got (and modded) my reamp box I wondered why I hadn't done it sooner.

I got the Radial ProRMP and did the resistor mod...super happy and only cost around $100 CAN total.
Old 5th January 2017
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KamandaSD View Post
It's not necessary but it certainly makes for a better recording. Once I got (and modded) my reamp box I wondered why I hadn't done it sooner.

I got the Radial ProRMP and did the resistor mod...super happy and only cost around $100 CAN total.
Ahh, the resistor mod... What's the resistor mod again?
Old 5th January 2017
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by original_min View Post
Ahh, the resistor mod... What's the resistor mod again?
Remove the 3rd resistor (R3)
Remove the other two resistors (R1) (R2)
Rebridge (R1) and (R2) with some wires.
Old 6th January 2017
  #25
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KamandaSD View Post
Remove the 3rd resistor (R3)
Remove the other two resistors (R1) (R2)
Rebridge (R1) and (R2) with some wires.
Thanks.

Can you describe the difference in sound quality before and after making the mod?
Old 6th January 2017
  #26
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przemak's Avatar
There is a difference in the output level. Sound quality is not a problem
Old 6th January 2017
  #27
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by przemak View Post
There is a difference in the output level. Sound quality is not a problem
Does the mod make the output louder, or more quiet?

Thanks.
Old 6th January 2017
  #28
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Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

I was using a headphone feed in 1969! I think the idea of a dedicated box is absurd.
Old 6th January 2017
  #29
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przemak's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by E-money View Post
Does the mod make the output louder, or more quiet?

Thanks.
Louder of course
Old 6th January 2017
  #30
Gear Maniac
 
przemak's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson View Post
I was using a headphone feed in 1969! I think the idea of a dedicated box is absurd.
Well, money
And with switching power supplys connecting grounds of computer and amplifier almost always couses hum.
Topic:
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