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Old 27th November 2014
  #841
You as well, Deng. I've only met one other lefty/righty in the forty years that I've been playing!
Old 27th November 2014
  #842
2005 Epiphone Les Paul Classic. Built to gibson 63 classic specs. Solid mahogany body with blue maple carved quilt top.

Electronics and pots replaced.

Dimarzio Evolution in the bridge
Dimarzio PAF JOE in the neck.

Sounds better than all the 3k dollar gibsons and prs customs ive ever played.
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Old 28th November 2014
  #843
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny nowhere View Post
You as well, Deng. I've only met one other lefty/righty in the forty years that I've been playing!
Plenty of famous and not famous lefties playing rightie - I am one and have several friends locally who are the same.
Old 28th November 2014
  #844
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deng's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivansc View Post
Plenty of famous and not famous lefties playing rightie - I am one and have several friends locally who are the same.
Left hander playing a lefthand guitar strung righty as well as playing a right handed guitar upside down ??.....that's us!!!!
In all the years I've been playing I've only met one too, a busker recently.

Lots of true lefties able yo play right-handed .... yeah!! but we are freakishly different....lol
Old 29th November 2014
  #845
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deng View Post
Nice to meet you....fellow left/righty!!!
Join the Albert King, Eric Gales, Doyle Bramhall II and others club....
But they play upside down, he seems to be using a left guitar strung right handed like a reverse right hand Hendrix thing. How in the hell do those chaps play upside down? Shorts out my brain.
Curious, does having that longer string length on the 6th help intonation?
Old 29th November 2014
  #846
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deng's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkhorse View Post
But they play upside down, he seems to be using a left guitar strung right handed like a reverse right hand Hendrix thing. How in the hell do those chaps play upside down? Shorts out my brain.
Curious, does having that longer string length on the 6th help intonation?
Yep! its the reverse of what Hendrix did, however Hendrix is a genuine left-hander but got a right handed bodied guitar and strung it for a left hander.
Missed out on getting a rare used Fender Hendrix Artist model years ago by a couple of days.
Left handed guitars were not readily available when I started out late '50s.

No intonation problem as the bridge/bridge saddles on Fenders have enough travel.
Old 29th November 2014
  #847
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deng View Post
Yep! its the reverse of what Hendrix did, however Hendrix is a genuine left-hander but got a right handed bodied guitar and strung it for a left hander.
Missed out on getting a rare used Fender Hendrix Artist model years ago by a couple of days.
Left handed guitars were not readily available when I started out late '50s.

No intonation problem as the bridge/bridge saddles on Fenders have enough travel.
Seems I have had many Strats where the 6th had to be pulled all the way flat to the bridge and still were not quite right. Some Fender's are dreadful. I find you really have to watch how hard you fret on the heavy strings as they are so easily pulled sharp by pressing too much. I try to set up with a pressure that is more normal to my playing.
I have sort of developed a technique and feel from playing so long where I can alter the slight intonation issue on the normal straight fret guitar via string pressure like those compensated true fret necks.
Just wondering if the longer string length helped the saddle intonation and if it made Hendrix's better tuned. I cannot fathom playing upside down when I see those cats do that it shorts out my brain. I always wondered why Jimi did not have custom left handers built unless he got something special from the reverse head stock. Seen a lot of guys like Joe Perry stick a left handed neck on a right body and do it that way. I almost tried that on my last build. I am so used to in line on top machine heads that sort of messes up my easy tuning feel turning the wrong way by habit.
Old 30th November 2014
  #848
Baz
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I read quite sometime back that the only reason Jimi played restrung righties was because they were made better. Could be something to it. I know with my L 78' Strat there are dowels in the headstock and my luthier freind told me it's because they used to have to "reverse the line" (w/e that means) when they went to make L models and drill into it to hold it down IIRC.

You can also see some poor tooling on the lower horn of my guitar that isn't even when they shaped it but I kind of like it as it adds some character.
Old 1st December 2014
  #849
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkhorse View Post
Seems I have had many Strats where the 6th had to be pulled all the way flat to the bridge and still were not quite right. Some Fender's are dreadful. I find you really have to watch how hard you fret on the heavy strings as they are so easily pulled sharp by pressing too much. I try to set up with a pressure that is more normal to my playing.
I have sort of developed a technique and feel from playing so long where I can alter the slight intonation issue on the normal straight fret guitar via string pressure like those compensated true fret necks.
Just wondering if the longer string length helped the saddle intonation and if it made Hendrix's better tuned. I cannot fathom playing upside down when I see those cats do that it shorts out my brain. I always wondered why Jimi did not have custom left handers built unless he got something special from the reverse head stock. Seen a lot of guys like Joe Perry stick a left handed neck on a right body and do it that way. I almost tried that on my last build. I am so used to in line on top machine heads that sort of messes up my easy tuning feel turning the wrong way by habit.
I'm not sure, but I think that Hendrix liked the different frequency response that the pickups accentuated when the strings were on upside down. To that end (for a broader palette of sound, that is) When I finally got the Tele, which was my first ever LH guitar, I filed a new nut and installed compensated saddles. When I routed out the middle position for the Strat pickup, I purposely made a RH rout and installed a RWRP to combat hum.

As far as improved low E intonation, I've no idea, since I've never played any other way!
Old 2nd December 2014
  #850
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Makes no difference on pickups turning one upside down is not reverse wind. A pickup does not know a thin string from a heavy one. Just mags with a coil of wire that makes an electrical signal as the string vibrates through the mag field. A reverse wound is a deliberate pcikup with the wire actually wound in the opposite direction. By itself it sounds the exact same, in combination with another single coil wound standard it creates the classic humbuckler effect, killing the noise single coils are known to have. Modern pickups these days are really quiet compared to the 60s stuff which was horrendous.
String length on either side of the nut or saddle does one thing, reduces sustain. That is a fact of physics. Long stretches of strings on either side of the bridge or nut serve to only reduce the sustain of the string vibration by virtue of resonance and dissipation of vibrations, just physics.

Some Fenders of that period were dreadful to intonate and everyone had problems understanding the tremolo and how it was designed to work. The floating fulcrum point drove a lot of players batty with the instability when they bent strings or broke a string and the whole guitar collapsed out of tune. I know of many things Jimi did to help his tone and make the guitar manageable for him.
1.) He screwed the trem hard down to the body and used 5 springs to keep it tight if a string broke. He mostly only bent the bar flat with effort, as sharp was limited and pushed into the guitar body. He did that to stabilize the bridge. Everyone likes a whammy/trem but no one likes the floating bridge concept as back then they had no stabilizer devices or bridge lock devices.
2.) Jimi tuned to Eb pitch and used 9s. While some presume this is about singing. I have tried in many arguments to explain that this makes a Strat sound better on string tension and playability. Even Malmsteen uses Eb and plays 8s.
3.) Jimi used a 20ft curly cable to actually use the capacitance loading to roll off, on purpose, the high end brittleness of Strats in that age. That along with the Eb pitch made his guitar more mid range without too much high end tinny. Many Strats in that age were rather dreadful instruments not gems.
4.) Playing a right hand upside down restrung left hand offers no real sonic benefit from a technical aspect. You also have to reverse the string nut which is a pain in the ass. The pickups make no difference and the string issues make no difference. All one can say is they like the look or that is what they are used to.
Jimi's tone is more a result of hand picked gear and slight mods by Roger Mayer as no two things in that age of no quality control were the same. Ask Roger Mayer who was there he said Jimi would go through a bunch of pedals trying to find ones that had the better sounding diodes, Mayer would often modify things to a certain thing Jimi preferred.
5.) A major trick of Jimi's was to use his Fuzz Face rolling the guitar volume down on his clean tones giving him an enhanced quality to the clean guitar like a precusor overdrive, boost, compressor pedal which did not exist in his day.

If one wants to put a left neck on a right Body or turn a right upside down and string it for left it is merely a matter of liking it, being different, or looking like Hendrix did. Sonically makes no real difference. Ever heard Jimi play a left guitar, a V and such, makes no difference as Jimi's hands made his music. I think he did that basically because left guitars were hard to come by and it made him different and stand out from the crowd which he liked a lot.
Old 3rd December 2014
  #851
Yes. No. Wait.

It took me three years of schematic design to get this guitar to do what it does. It is a complicated design. It does not use a blade switch to choose which pickup is activated, it utilises two pan pots, one push-pull pot, and two DPDT mini toggles. It allows me to dial in percentages of each pickup, providing an unlimited palette of tones.

The bridge pickup is tapped so that it can produce two distinct voicings. The middle pickup is a RWRP pickup, which I can throw in or out of phase with the other two. The neck pickup is a stacked humbucker, wired in parallel/series configuration. I designed this instrument to record with. To this end, all three pickups are constantly activated to a degree, so the guitar is unusually quiet.

Whereas I agree that the pickup doesn't recognise the difference in individual string gauges, the angle and/or distance along the path of the strings that the pickup is positioned makes a profound difference in the way the pickup reproduces the sound, precisely because of the physical properties which you describe.

Oh, and for the record, I can't freaking stand whammy bars.

Last edited by johnny nowhere; 3rd December 2014 at 02:08 AM.. Reason: I'm turning Japanese.
Old 3rd December 2014
  #852
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny nowhere View Post
Yes. No. Wait.

It took me three years of schematic design to get this guitar to do what it does. It is a complicated design. It does not use a blade switch to choose which pickup is activated, it utilises two pan pots, one push-pull pot, and two DPDT mini toggles. It allows me to dial in percentages of each pickup, providing an unlimited palette of tones.

The bridge pickup is tapped so that it can produce two distinct voicings. The middle pickup is a RWRP pickup, which I can throw in or out of phase with the other two. The neck pickup is a stacked humbucker, wired in parallel/series configuration. I designed this instrument to record with. To this end, all three pickups are constantly activated to a degree, so the guitar is unusually quiet.

Whereas I agree that the pickup doesn't recognise the difference in individual string gauges, the angle and/or distance along the path of the strings that the pickup is positioned makes a profound difference in the way the pickup reproduces the sound, precisely because of the physical properties which you describe.

Oh, and for the record, I can't freaking stand whammy bars.
Nice options. Yes indeed pickup wiring is the issue on tones no argument there. I was merely listing what Hendrix did in his day. But the upside down thing does not change the tone. It just looks odd and at times Jimi looked rather odd, he liked it.
Sounds like you have your's rigged to a similar wiring scheme of options that Jimmy Page has on his signature Les Paul. I love options myself.
Yes tilt effects the tone by changing the distance to the string. I think most have a habit of setting pickups too close.
I never use out of phase stuff much, just thins out too much especially on single coils. I like the combination plunky tones on 2 and 4.

And I can dig a whammy if it has proper setup and a mag trem lock device or a bridge lock that stabilizes it. I have not had one since a Carvin I had that had their bridge lock device which they no longer make for some reason. All my guitars are hard tail strings through the body design.
I had my kit guitar wired to a 9 position option then I switched out to a Seymour Duncan prewired gold Everything Axe set. That one has been a fav. My other Strat has a Dimarzio Area '58 and two Carvin dual rails, no phase switches or anything. Just straight up Strat on steroids. The Duncan is a marvelous set. The push pull on the bridge which switches the JB Jr into series coils sounds like the mid position I love on a Les Paul.
Old 18th December 2014
  #853
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Latest rendering of my kit Strat with newly added Roland GK-3 pickup. Seymour Duncan prewired Everything Axe set with Gold pickguard. Mod on the pickguard was to move the volume a little further from the bridge to give room for my fingers and hand to sit on the bridge more comfortably. Just was no room between the bridge and the volume for my fingers to rest.
Guitar is made of all Carvin parts, ebony fingerboard diamond abalone markers. Sperzel locking tuners all black chrome hardware. Meticulously intonated and proper neck tilt adjust, GK-3 piclup hard installed screw assembly. Finish is my blend of ebony, and red walnut stain with Tung Oil, not the prettiest girl in the finishing school but quite the tone monster.
Old 27th December 2014
  #854
Old 27th December 2014
  #855
Lives for gear
Measurable physics on vibration indicate string length on either side of the nut or bridge reduces sustain not increasing it. And all sorts of resonance and vibration dissipate vibration and sustain. That is just measurable science.
That being said "sustain" does not always mean that much in a guitars tone, it has been observed some of the old time players had the sustain a wood plank. Everyone thinks a Les Paul sustains more but in reality others have more.

I think Jimi did what he did to be different and stand out more iconic, seen what he wore? Jimi was very much about the image, the first thing one responds to when seeing that reverse guitar is him.
As for pickup angle, anything can be surmised but the actual physics response of the frequencies is probably not measurable in difference. One can compare the use of Humbucker pickups next to the bridge with an angle. Not sure that really mattered much at all. Certainly not enough to really play upside down models. No one yet seems to be reverse cutting them.
Pain in switching a right guitar left is one has to remove and redo the nut which cannot be fun nor something a general guitar player would attempt. Merely turning it around does not work well because the slots are cut backwards. We have to find some blow up pics of the end end of Jimi's guitars to see what he actually did. I believe it is a left handed cut string nut.

Jimi used a long coil curly cable to act as a capacitance load to roll off some of the brittle high end of the Strats in those days. He also used his Fuzz Face a lot with the guitar volume rolled down as sort of a preamping overdrive thing which did not exist in his day. Witnessed according to Roger Mayer.
Old 29th December 2014
  #856
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Porto View Post
Another thing to consider on a reverse strung Strat is pole piece stagger. The pole pieces will be higher on the bass side and lower on the treble side, which will effect string to string balance. Hendrix's guitar tech said that he used a thinner low E string to get the proper volume balance across the strings. he used .10 to .38. That would be in line with compensating for the higher pole pieces on the bass side. Trying to compensate by raising the whole pickup on the treble side would result in the G string pole being to close to the string.
Actually a good point, one can see Jimi's tilt on most pics.
Pole pieces are a factor but when one looks at a basic humbuckler all that sort of does not matter much. His sound was often so fuzzed and treated I cannot tell much in the order of string balance. Jimi also played Eb tension even with the lighter gauge strings.
I think the cat has a mythical status which puts more weight on everything he did when in reality he may have not had much of a clue to the tech side of things we know now. Hearing a lot of Jimi's live sound renders a wall of noise, hiss and hum, nothing much I ever aspired to attain. I like some of Hendrix more obscure tracks and his clean sound in the studio was outstanding. When it comes to the use of the Univibe and many other pedals many developed after his time, I enjoy what Robin Trower was doing. I do credit Jimi, with changing the Electric guitar and bringing in the dawn of effect pedals, he changed the guitar, that is iconic. As for being the myth of the "best" guitarist of all time, not really, there have been many. But before Jimi, except for early Clapton, Beck, Page and a few others, most of it sounded really bad. Jimi raised the bar.
And as a performer and creating the guitar god thing he was on top.
Old 30th December 2014
  #857
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TheTritoneTerror's Avatar
 

My Jazzmaster. It's a little, uh, loud in the looks department, but it's the best feeling and playing guitar I've tried.

Old 31st December 2014
  #858
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Porto View Post
I suppose if one wanted to use a RH Strat strung for lefty, it probably wouldn't be too hard to turn the pickups upside-down if it was a concern.

I am just mentioning what gets changed tonally. I agree, I don't think it was part of Hendrix's sound or mystique, at least as far as he was concerned personally. But for those who want to note for note (noise for noise?) copy Hendrix, it may matter to them.

Also, an interesting tidbit regarding Hendrix tuning down, Roger Mayer mentions in an interview that due to the reverse headstock, w/ the treble strings having a shorter length to the tuning posts, they would be stiffer to play, and so Hendrix preferred tuning down a half step to facilitate bending of the higher strings.

One of my favorite live Hendrix tunes was a version of Red House that he played a Flying V. He actually played a V quite a bit later in his career, and even had a proper left handed version designed for him.

I am just glad Jimi is remembered these many years since he passed. Whatever any inspiration anyone gets from him I am sure he would have dug it.
A unique talent no matter how you access him.
Old 31st December 2014
  #859
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTritoneTerror View Post
My Jazzmaster. It's a little, uh, loud in the looks department, but it's the best feeling and playing guitar I've tried.

Goes nicely with your couch.
Old 1st January 2015
  #860
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Always wonder why they do not put all those cool switch combinations and options on all guitars these days??
Old 2nd January 2015
  #861
Gear Head
Heres my 35th anniversary Dean Z I just got. Absolutely Beautiful Guitar!
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Old 4th January 2015
  #862
Today I'm really digging this one
Old 4th January 2015
  #863
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baz View Post
I read quite sometime back that the only reason Jimi played restrung righties was because they were made better. Could be something to it.
That's pretty much nonsense. If anything the lefties were made better because they were special order. And you have to remember that 1966/67 to the late '70s was the absolute PIT of CBS bad workmanship in guitars. Bad workmanship, corporate cost cutting, bad materials, slipshod assembly, nonexistent quality control - crank out as many as possible as cheap as possible.

No, the most likely reason Hendrix used restrung righties was that he could get them in quantity, cheap, pretty much anywhere and any time instead of having to pay full list price and wait 6 months or more for his order to be processed. Strats were pretty much a commodity to him, at least as far as road guitars were concerned.
Old 4th January 2015
  #864
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkhorse View Post
1.) He screwed the trem hard down to the body and used 5 springs to keep it tight if a string broke. He mostly only bent the bar flat with effort, as sharp was limited and pushed into the guitar body. He did that to stabilize the bridge. Everyone likes a whammy/trem but no one likes the floating bridge concept as back then they had no stabilizer devices or bridge lock devices.
Nonsense.

I saw Jimi play live on his first US headline tour and twice on his last US tour and he most DEFINITELY pulled up on the bar. And you can clearly hear it on his recordings, Third Stone From The Sun" being a good example.

Whoever told you that was pulling your leg/deliberately misdirecting you/just FOS.

And a really good touring tech can stabilize a stock Strat bar just fine, it just takes experiences and knowing a couple tweaks to do to the bar.
Old 4th January 2015
  #865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Nonsense.

I saw Jimi play live on his first US headline tour and twice on his last US tour and he most DEFINITELY pulled up on the bar. And you can clearly hear it on his recordings, Third Stone From The Sun" being a good example.

Whoever told you that was pulling your leg/deliberately misdirecting you/just FOS.

And a really good touring tech can stabilize a stock Strat bar just fine, it just takes experiences and knowing a couple tweaks to do to the bar.
You can still pull up but with limited range, You force the Trem into the body, Jimi was brutal on guitars, he did not give a crap what it did to them .
Roger Mayer was there and commented on that Jimi did and used. It is pretty commonly known he used 5 springs and deaded the trem to the body for stability. A lot of players do that as they cannot manage a floating fulcrum trem as it was designed, the old Fenders are pretty crappy compared to modern ones we have now. Roger said Jimi did this so in case he broke a string the spring pull would not savage the whole guitars tuning and he could keep going. I've done it on old Fenders and oddly enough that is where I got the idea.
You might consider Jimi did many things in the studio and had different guitars for different uses that were not used live, geeeessssshhhh.
As for nonsense, seriously man I get sick of being insulted by some on this board as if no one knows anything or cannot know anything that does not agree with a few. If Mayer does not know what he is talking about and many other articles written about Hendrix much less pictures man, you can see the 5 springs and the screwed down trem.
Old 5th January 2015
  #866
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Porto View Post
Hard to say what Hendrix did throughout his career, or even with different guitars. But if you watch the Woodstock video, which has some AMAZING closeups of his playing, on his white Strat the bridge is pinned flush with the body and he has 5 springs in the cavity.
Exactly. Hendrix was only with us a few short years and we have to sort of look at what he developed into near the end of his time.
Just as he used a long curly guitar cable despite the cap loading effect he did it to suck off some of the harsh high end Strat's had in that time. Roger said a fav trick of Jimi was to have his fuzz face on but the guitar volume rolled down on his cleaner tones which gave him enhancement precursor to overdrives and boosts which he helped spawn. I credit Jimi and Roger for bringing on the age of effect pedals and changing the way the guitar sounded.
He also used light strings and tuned to Eb pitch. Which many will argue due to singing but some know this simply lowers the tension on a Strat making playing easier and a Strat just seems to sound better at Eb pitch. Yet the arguments about that go on forever.
What I say, I know, it is never baseless opinion. Some of the other arguments I get into about hollow cabinets and so on drive one around the bend. This site in particular lends to constant arguments about what I used to consider given axiomatic subjects.
Old 5th January 2015
  #867
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkhorse View Post
You can still pull up but with limited range, You force the Trem into the body, Jimi was brutal on guitars, he did not give a crap what it did to them .
Roger Mayer was there and commented on that Jimi did and used. It is pretty commonly known he used 5 springs and deaded the trem to the body for stability. A lot of players do that as they cannot manage a floating fulcrum trem as it was designed, the old Fenders are pretty crappy compared to modern ones we have now. Roger said Jimi did this so in case he broke a string the spring pull would not savage the whole guitars tuning and he could keep going. I've done it on old Fenders and oddly enough that is where I got the idea.
You might consider Jimi did many things in the studio and had different guitars for different uses that were not used live, geeeessssshhhh.
I'd guess that he probably had different guitars with different setups for different songs. He may very well have pulled the tailpiece down to the body on some for stability and had others floating for the pull-up on certain songs. I know that for damn sure the wild and extreme pull-ups I saw him do on "Third Stone" would not have been possible with the bridge flat to the body, no matter how hard he pulled - he simply would have broken the bar off. Which was not had to do on Strats of that era, even with tying down the block. I dunno if the new ones break that easily or not, but back then it was a pretty common problem.

Quote:
As for nonsense, seriously man I get sick of being insulted by some on this board as if no one knows anything or cannot know anything that does not agree with a few. If Mayer does not know what he is talking about and many other articles written about Hendrix much less pictures man, you can see the 5 springs and the screwed down trem.
Well, all I can say is that I was there. Were you?

I'm sure Mayer knows what he's talking about but I doubt very seriously if he tells everything he knows. As to articles, there has been so much outright BS published that there is no way to really determine how factual a given article might be unless you actually know the person in real life. Some people have been known to intentionally give totally erroneous interviews, either to deliberately throw people off or simply as a joke to see what outrageous crap people will swallow. So you go ahead and read your interviews. I'll believe what I saw.
Old 6th January 2015
  #868
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
I'd guess that he probably had different guitars with different setups for different songs. He may very well have pulled the tailpiece down to the body on some for stability and had others floating for the pull-up on certain songs. I know that for damn sure the wild and extreme pull-ups I saw him do on "Third Stone" would not have been possible with the bridge flat to the body, no matter how hard he pulled - he simply would have broken the bar off. Which was not had to do on Strats of that era, even with tying down the block. I dunno if the new ones break that easily or not, but back then it was a pretty common problem.



Well, all I can say is that I was there. Were you?

I'm sure Mayer knows what he's talking about but I doubt very seriously if he tells everything he knows. As to articles, there has been so much outright BS published that there is no way to really determine how factual a given article might be unless you actually know the person in real life. Some people have been known to intentionally give totally erroneous interviews, either to deliberately throw people off or simply as a joke to see what outrageous crap people will swallow. So you go ahead and read your interviews. I'll believe what I saw.
So you were there, really? Are you in any documentaries, clips or interviews of the time as we have a whole lot of conformation as to what Roger has said in multiple interviews and film which "I saw" as well.
I am not sure what the argument is supposed to be, Jimi used things in the studio he did not use live? Of course, doesn't everyone?
He used 5 springs and screwed down trem live as the disaster of a broken string during performance kills the guitar. Crappy bad way to do a trem but unlike today we have trem stability devices that can allow the trem to be set up on a floating fulcrum point as it was designed and patented.
I actually stopped using old Fender's and Strats ages ago because of the cheesy classic machine heads, bridge parts and poor quality of pickups.
This was before the onset of the custom shop and signature models, some which still leave much to be desired.
I accredit Hendrix with changing the sound of the electric guitar and with the onset of the effect pedal market but he was not the best guitarist in the world, and certainly not the smartest.
Old 6th January 2015
  #869
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkhorse View Post
So you were there, really? Are you in any documentaries, clips or interviews of the time as we have a whole lot of conformation as to what Roger has said in multiple interviews and film which "I saw" as well..
Yes, I was there. Saw him once in Newark, NJ on his first US headline tour, Soft Machine opening. Saw him twice on his last U.S. tour, met him in between shows, talked to him and shook his hand. The two shows he did that day were written up by Rolling Stone as the best of the tour - which was a little strange, as AFAIK they never reviewed shows at The University of Oklahoma before or after that.

As I said, I WAS THERE, watched him live. Not read "articles" or third hand interviews.

I know what I saw.
Old 6th January 2015
  #870
Warning about going off topic.

Thead title is your favourite guitar. That's means one you own not someone else's.

Continue off topic and you might get an infraction.

Let's get back on track please.

Thank you

(no whiny PMs either please, thanks)
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