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Anyone ReAmp their DI guitar tracks in a pro studio?
Old 21st May 2020
  #1
Anyone ReAmp their DI guitar tracks in a pro studio?

Anyone ReAmp their DI guitar tracks in a pro studio?
What was you experience?
What studio did you use?

Looking for something preferably in NY/NJ (so I can actually do it in person after the health crises is over) but any good studio with good people will work since the session can be done remotely.

Looking for a studio to have a nice collection of amps - I have a soft spot for JCM800 and fender blackface deluxe amps

Preferably I would like to get two tracks for every reamped track one SM57 and one Royer 121.
Old 21st May 2020
  #2
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Yuri Kogan's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarist9891 View Post
Anyone ReAmp their DI guitar tracks in a pro studio?
What was you experience?
What studio did you use?

Looking for something preferably in NY/NJ (so I can actually do it in person after the health crises is over) but any good studio with good people will work since the session can be done remotely.

Looking for a studio to have a nice collection of amps - I have a soft spot for JCM800 and fender blackface deluxe amps

Preferably I would like to get two tracks for every reamped track one SM57 and one Royer 121.
We used to offer that as a service. Had requests from all over the country, people uploading tracks for a re-amp. Had "remote" sessions where people from UK and Japan were watching it on Skype and commenting. But these days its hard to find the time for that, for the money we charged at least. Good practice for junior engineers and students though.
We have about 190 amps, vintage, boutiques...
Old 21st May 2020
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri Kogan View Post
We used to offer that as a service. Had requests from all over the country, people uploading tracks for a re-amp. Had "remote" sessions where people from UK and Japan were watching it on Skype and commenting. But these days its hard to find the time for that, for the money we charged at least. Good practice for junior engineers and students though.
We have about 190 amps, vintage, boutiques...
Yes the studios I did contact gave me quotes I thought were WAY to high. I understand they are running a business but I have been doing this for 15 years myself and can see when they are trying to take advantage of me (I won't name drop any studios).

If I actually came to the studio I know I can do the job in an hour. Now, of course I know my song, what sounds I am going for etc but still some are telling me it will take 3 hours to reamp 5 DI guitar tracks for one 3 minute song? Its not like I am sitting there recording and doing takes.

At this rate I will wait until the crises is over and just book one hour at a studio and do it myself (finding a studio that doesn't have a 3 hour minimum is another story)
Old 21st May 2020
  #4
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Yuri Kogan's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarist9891 View Post
Yes the studios I did contact gave me quotes I thought were WAY to high. I understand they are running a business but I have been doing this for 15 years myself and can see when they are trying to take advantage of me (I won't name drop any studios).

If I actually came to the studio I know I can do the job in an hour. Now, of course I know my song, what sounds I am going for etc but still some are telling me it will take 3 hours to reamp 5 DI guitar tracks for one 3 minute song? Its not like I am sitting there recording and doing takes.

At this rate I will wait until the crises is over and just book one hour at a studio and do it myself (finding a studio that doesn't have a 3 hour minimum is another story lol)
They are probably looking at freeing a time slot, engaging an engineer or an assistant who knows the studio and wouldn't blow n expensive amp. Knows where the mics are and will help with the setup. Get the right cabs you need and will setup the re-amp/record chain. Then once you have the sound you will re-amp all 5 tracks lets say in an hour, after tinkering with the tone enough. Then you need to pack up the studio and leave it ready for the next guy. So I would say over 2 hrs, rounded up to 3.
We did a lot of it on our own time once we got instructions from the client (that's if he knew exactly what he wanted, which often was not what he wanted if you get my drift). After paying the junior for his efforts, there was nothing left for the studio. So we don't do it much any more. Mostly as a part of the project, if the client changed his/her mind re tone, or just wants to try another idea.
Old 21st May 2020
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri Kogan View Post
They are probably looking at freeing a time slot, engaging an engineer or an assistant who knows the studio and wouldn't blow n expensive amp. Knows where the mics are and will help with the setup. Get the right cabs you need and will setup the re-amp/record chain. Then once you have the sound you will re-amp all 5 tracks lets say in an hour, after tinkering with the tone enough. Then you need to pack up the studio and leave it ready for the next guy. So I would say over 2 hrs, rounded up to 3.
We did a lot of it on our own time once we got instructions from the client (that's if he knew exactly what he wanted, which often was not what he wanted if you get my drift). After paying the junior for his efforts, there was nothing left for the studio. So we don't do it much any more. Mostly as a part of the project, if the client changed his/her mind re tone, or just wants to try another idea.
I get it from their perspective, but I don't think I should be charged for the, packing the studio/studio tear down...(on the side I work with songwriters that want a full band arrangement after they wrote their song on acoustic guitar or piano. I program drums for them, strings if needed, play bass and guitar. Also track their vocals. I never charge for any preparation I need to make or teardown. I simply charge an hourly rate for when the work (from the clients perspective) is actually being done)

anyway if this is how all studios operate, I will need to find something where I will only use their live room and a 4x12 speaker cabinet. I can bring my own amp heads, pedals, mics, pres/converter/laptop. And be my own engineer. If it will end up taking 2 hours instead of one at least I will be in control of the situation and know that it actually took me longer. (if it is the setup that takes me longer than anticipated, I will reamp 3 songs at a time instead of one). I remember that the studio I used to record in, once I dialed the sound once, every consequent visit through the same amp/speaker cabinet the setup time was 10/15 mins long.
Old 21st May 2020
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarist9891 View Post
I get it from their perspective, but I don't think I should be charged for the, packing the studio/studio tear down...(on the side I work with songwriters that want a full band arrangement after they wrote their song on acoustic guitar or piano. I program drums for them, strings if needed, play bass and guitar. Also track their vocals. I never charge for any preparation I need to make or teardown. I simply charge an hourly rate for when the work (from the clients perspective) is actually being done)

anyway if this is how all studios operate, I will need to find something where I will only use their live room and a 4x12 speaker cabinet. I can bring my own amp heads, pedals, mics, pres/converter/laptop. And be my own engineer. If it will end up taking 2 hours instead of one at least I will be in control of the situation and know that it actually took me longer. (if it is the setup that takes me longer than anticipated, I will reamp 3 songs at a time instead of one). I remember that the studio I used to record in, once I dialed the sound once, every consequent visit through the same amp/speaker cabinet the setup time was 10/15 mins long.
I get it. But you are charged for time primarily. Whether you are going to setup their amp or yours, you are there occupying the studio. Meaning they cannot use it for anything else, they pay power bills, cleaning, maintenance. If you stuff up some gear which is worth $$$ because you are not familiar with it or are just frustrated, will you reimburse them for it? Would you pay the increase in insurance premium? Would you you replace this equipment during the downtime? Would you buy them a new speaker if you blow it. Many engineers do not want to come in for 1 hr, because it takes them longer to get there and back. Some studio owners consider it a precedent - ie if you get a favour, everyone else will ask for it and destroy their business.
Yes each take is only 3-5 min. But the preparation takes longer and the take-down means downtime for them. Besides they are probably paying their assistant to do it, out of their own pocket. Your engineer will probably be much more efficient with that assistant there then without one in an unfamiliar studio. Plus they don't know who you are. I remember we had a client who brought an "experienced engineer" and his assistant. Turned out the "engineer" was 2nd year in the SAE, the assistant just a mate. They were 2sec away from blowing a 1972 Hiwatt and an early 70s SVT. Couldn't figure out even the basic chain and when the client complained that half a day has gone, they tried blaming it on the studio. He later came back (after paying for the other session) to do it with us, and my student did everything he wanted in half a day. He left a very complementary reference in our client book after that. From then on, assistants are compulsory. The equipment is too expensive (sometimes irreplaceable) and downtime is costly too. And the reputation of the studio is paramount. But it costs money. My downtime for setups (which we include on the previous night for >2day bookings), pack-up and the session cost me time = money.
Sorry for a long one.
Old 21st May 2020
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri Kogan View Post
I get it. But you are charged for time primarily. Whether you are going to setup their amp or yours, you are there occupying the studio. Meaning they cannot use it for anything else, they pay power bills, cleaning, maintenance. If you stuff up some gear which is worth $$$ because you are not familiar with it or are just frustrated, will you reimburse them for it? Would you pay the increase in insurance premium? Would you you replace this equipment during the downtime? Would you buy them a new speaker if you blow it. Many engineers do not want to come in for 1 hr, because it takes them longer to get there and back. Some studio owners consider it a precedent - ie if you get a favour, everyone else will ask for it and destroy their business.
Yes each take is only 3-5 min. But the preparation takes longer and the take-down means downtime for them. Besides they are probably paying their assistant to do it, out of their own pocket. Your engineer will probably be much more efficient with that assistant there then without one in an unfamiliar studio. Plus they don't know who you are. I remember we had a client who brought an "experienced engineer" and his assistant. Turned out the "engineer" was 2nd year in the SAE, the assistant just a mate. They were 2sec away from blowing a 1972 Hiwatt and an early 70s SVT. Couldn't figure out even the basic chain and when the client complained that half a day has gone, they tried blaming it on the studio. He later came back (after paying for the other session) to do it with us, and my student did everything he wanted in half a day. He left a very complementary reference in our client book after that. From then on, assistants are compulsory. The equipment is too expensive (sometimes irreplaceable) and downtime is costly too. And the reputation of the studio is paramount. But it costs money. My downtime for setups (which we include on the previous night for >2day bookings), pack-up and the session cost me time = money.
Sorry for a long one.
Totally get what you are saying. I get it from a studio owner perspective. Makes sense. I guess I will keep shopping around until I find what works for me.
Old 21st May 2020
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarist9891 View Post
Totally get what you are saying. I get it from a studio owner perspective. Makes sense. I guess I will keep shopping around until I find what works for me.
Yes . Can you borrow a re-amp box, an the cab? I presume you have a 57 and some pre? And you have mentioned you already have the head. If you can borrow or lease, you can do everything in your own time in the environment you are familiar with. May come out cheaper?
Old 21st May 2020
  #9
I have a Radial reamp box. As far as pre it is a HA73jr in a Rubert Neve designs 500 series chassis. Mics are 57,58, at4033cl, Neumann u87. It is the volume thatโ€™s the issue. I plug my Marshall head into a Suhr reactive load and use cabinet IRs because of neighbors. So ye technically if a studio just let me use their 4x12, their live room, and a pair of ns10s (donโ€™t want to bring my own) I would be fine. Donโ€™t need to touch their console, or outboard or anything. We will see, if worst come to worst there are expensive options available. Or just keep using IRs. (As of now it is an experiment to see if reamping guitars is worth it) I just donโ€™t want reamping guitars to cost more than about 70 usd. Especially since theoretically I plan to do it often. We will see what I can find.

Last edited by Guitarist9891; 21st May 2020 at 07:48 AM..
Old 21st May 2020
  #10
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I could see a (struggling) smaller studio with good amps being OK with that but from a business perspectives (pro studios are businesses, right?) I understand's Yuri's point of view.

And as he hinted it, they would be dealing with all kind of bedroom shredder wannabes who can barely play and would be bitching the reamp did not make them sound like Eddie Van Halen so no thanks.
Old 21st May 2020
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by numero6 View Post

And as he hinted it, they would be dealing with all kind of bedroom shredder wannabes who can barely play and would be bitching the reamp did not make them sound like Eddie Van Halen so no thanks.
hope you don't mean me

Last edited by Guitarist9891; 21st May 2020 at 09:31 PM..
Old 22nd May 2020
  #12
Well I found a high end multi room facility in NYC to do it for a VERY good price without the multi hour B.S. minimum. And this is the studio that I will now go to for ALL my future pro studio needs. We are talking Neve board, tons of amps, tons of outboard and a VERY impressive mic collection. When you treat someone fair you get a client for life.

Hopefully next session I will actually be able to attend in person and the current health crises will be over.
Old 22nd May 2020
  #13
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Yuri Kogan's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarist9891 View Post
Well I found a high end multi room facility in NYC to do it for a VERY good price without the multi hour B.S. minimum. And this is the studio that I will now go to for ALL my future pro studio needs. We are talking Neve board, tons of amps, tons of outboard and a VERY impressive mic collection. When you treat someone fair you get a client for life.

Hopefully next session I will actually be able to attend in person and the current health crises will be over.
See, he who looks, will find.
WRT client for life - are you sure you will be able to find enough money even for a day next time? To continue funding 1hr (or less) sessions on a continuous basis, is akin to working for $0 (or sustaining a loss).Meaning a really bad business model. But everyone to their own, I guess. I did freebies for people I know from time to time, but it is definitely, not a part of our business model. People need to respect the service we provide.
Old 22nd May 2020
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarist9891 View Post
Anyone ReAmp their DI guitar tracks in a pro studio?
What was you experience?
What studio did you use?

Looking for something preferably in NY/NJ (so I can actually do it in person after the health crises is over) but any good studio with good people will work since the session can be done remotely.

Looking for a studio to have a nice collection of amps - I have a soft spot for JCM800 and fender blackface deluxe amps

Preferably I would like to get two tracks for every reamped track one SM57 and one Royer 121.
Perhaps you're limited for space and the ability to make it loud, but for not ridiculous amounts of money, you could build your own setup - start small with one or two amps, a couple of mic's, a re-amp box (I use a Radial i got for 99 bucks) and roll your own re-amped tracks.

Blackface Bandmasters from the late 60's are going in the 700-800 dollar range, SF Twins a bit more (you can BF them). There a are many great Marshall clones (I use a DRZ Maz Jr I bought for 1200 dollars ten years ago).

By the time you pay for studio time and time of your own on remote recording, you can begin building your own setup. Again, if space or noise makes this a non-starter, apologies.
Old 22nd May 2020
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri Kogan View Post
See, he who looks, will find.
WRT client for life - are you sure you will be able to find enough money even for a day next time? To continue funding 1hr (or less) sessions on a continuous basis, is akin to working for $0 (or sustaining a loss).Meaning a really bad business model. But everyone to their own, I guess. I did freebies for people I know from time to time, but it is definitely, not a part of our business model. People need to respect the service we provide.
It's for my own personal project. If I was ReAmping tracks I recorded for a client the client would pay the studio fee.

As for a business model, as a client I am looking for the best deal for me. The studios are looking out for themselves, I am looking out for myself. The only way a transaction can happen is if we both find the terms acceptable. If it works it works, if it doesn't it doesn't.

If I don't want to pay for setup or teardown time, I could care less how it works form a studio's point of view. I am looking out for my own wallet, the same way most studios are looking out for their wallets hence the booking minimum. There could be a multitude of reasons why that studio decided to offer me the price I am comfortable with. Thats their decision, why they offered me a price that I was comfortable with is irrelevant to me, as long as the price and service is good.

Obviously client for life only applies if we both continue to find all terms of the session acceptable. Hopefully we will. If at some point we won't I will find another studio. There are plenty of studios to choose from.

"are you sure you will be able to find enough money even for a day next time?" Don't really get that statement. If I decide that the price is fair for a service, sure I will find the money And there are plenty of things I can do in my own home studio, so I seldom would need a whole day in a pro studio if ever.
Old 22nd May 2020
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharp11 View Post
Perhaps you're limited for space and the ability to make it loud, but for not ridiculous amounts of money, you could build your own setup - start small with one or two amps, a couple of mic's, a re-amp box (I use a Radial i got for 99 bucks) and roll your own re-amped tracks.

Blackface Bandmasters from the late 60's are going in the 700-800 dollar range, SF Twins a bit more (you can BF them). There a are many great Marshall clones (I use a DRZ Maz Jr I bought for 1200 dollars ten years ago).

By the time you pay for studio time and time of your own on remote recording, you can begin building your own setup. Again, if space or noise makes this a non-starter, apologies.
I know, I got plenty of gear, its turning up the amps loud thats the issue. I actually get very good tones with tube amps going to a suhr reactive load going to IRs, this is honestly an experiment - if reamping in a studio will be an audible step up once the song is mixed.
Old 22nd May 2020
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarist9891 View Post
It's for my own personal project. If I was ReAmping tracks I recorded for a client the client would pay the studio fee.

As for a business model, as a client I am looking for the best deal for me. The studios are looking out for themselves, I am looking out for myself. The only way a transaction can happen is if we both find the terms acceptable. If it works it works, if it doesn't it doesn't.

If I don't want to pay for setup or teardown time, I could care less how it works form a studio's point of view. I am looking out for my own wallet, the same way most studios are looking out for their wallets hence the booking minimum. There could be a multitude of reasons why that studio decided to offer me the price I am comfortable with. Thats their decision, why they offered me a price that I was comfortable with is irrelevant to me, as long as the price and service is good.

Obviously client for life only applies if we both continue to find all terms of the session acceptable. Hopefully we will. If at some point we won't I will find another studio. There are plenty of studios to choose from.

"are you sure you will be able to find enough money even for a day next time?" Don't really get that statement. If I decide that the price is fair for a service, sure I will find the money And there are plenty of things I can do in my own home studio, so I seldom would need a whole day in a pro studio if ever.
You are absolutely correct - from your point of view. Can a studio survive in those conditions - that's their point of view. At the end of the day its a commercial decision. That cab sot e few hundreds of dollars. The mic and pre-amp ~whatever. Electricity, supervision, rent.... Wouldn't stay open for long doing little 1hr sessions (lunch money) here and there. But as you said - it is THEIR decision. I would say, by the time you go back there, the studio will be a forgotten memory. There are other studios, for sure. But will they make the same investment to subsist on 1hr sessions? Can they even afford the rent? Stuff? I would doubt it. This sort of investment is made for artists who need a creative place with options. They then make a financial commitment (like any business) because they respect the opportunity and the commitment from the studio. THAT relationship will continue into the future.
Good luck with your re-amp, I am sure you will get great results.
Old 22nd May 2020
  #18
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I am amused that the OP doesn't understand why he should be paying for setup/teardown costs for his session - it's a failure to understand business principles of total costs. If you rent a space for an event, you'd pay for the time you're using the space, whether that's load-in/setup, event, or teardown/load-out. You wouldn't just pay for the time the event happens. But perhaps you found a studio so desperate for cash they'll do anything to get live bodies in the door (and cashflow). Enjoy it while it lasts.
Old 22nd May 2020
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by nedorama View Post
I am amused that the OP doesn't understand why he should be paying for setup/teardown costs for his session - it's a failure to understand business principles of total costs. If you rent a space for an event, you'd pay for the time you're using the space, whether that's load-in/setup, event, or teardown/load-out. You wouldn't just pay for the time the event happens. But perhaps you found a studio so desperate for cash they'll do anything to get live bodies in the door (and cashflow). Enjoy it while it lasts.
Actually if anything I am interested in the total price that the studio would give me for the job. Especially in this case when I am doing it remotely. If the number works we do the session, if not I will shop around.
Old 25th May 2020
  #20
I have a pretty nice studio, with some cool amps, a Bogner Ecstacy 101b, a Fuchs Triple Drive Supreme, a Guytron GT100, a hardwired AC30, a Boogie MkV35, a 66 Fender Pro Reverb and a Randall RM100 with a few different modules. Once in a while I've done re-amp sessions but usually for projects I wind up mixing.
Old 25th May 2020
  #21
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I've done a reamping job once and it was slightly different because the client wanted a leslie. But it was very time consuming. It's was fun and interesting, but it wouldn't be a service I would promote as a part of the business.

To make cost effective reamping you probably need to run a studio where you have certain known amps setup and mic:ed all the time. Like a vintage Super Lead half stack, a Fender Deluxe Reverb or something and then before and after examples on the studio's website.

Then you can offer certain types of reamping at a predictable cost.

But starting from scratch... Basically that would be as much work as with any production, but with the disadvantage that the client isn't on site and can comment while developing the guitar sound.

It's of course fine for a higher budget project, but probably not for a hobbyist who hopes for great sounding guitars for his home recordings.
Old 25th May 2020
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Bigsby View Post
I've done a reamping job once and it was slightly different because the client wanted a leslie. But it was very time consuming. It's was fun and interesting, but it wouldn't be a service I would promote as a part of the business.

To make cost effective reamping you probably need to run a studio where you have certain known amps setup and mic:ed all the time. Like a vintage Super Lead half stack, a Fender Deluxe Reverb or something and then before and after examples on the studio's website.

Then you can offer certain types of reamping at a predictable cost.

But starting from scratch... Basically that would be as much work as with any production, but with the disadvantage that the client isn't on site and can comment while developing the guitar sound.

It's of course fine for a higher budget project, but probably not for a hobbyist who hopes for great sounding guitars for his home recordings.
The main issue is that the client usually THINKS he know what sound he wants and how to get it. Then ones he sets up he realises its not quite what he wants, so he starts tinkering to fine-tune, and then complains it has taken them 4 hrs instead of 1. Plus, as in this case he does not consider setup/pull down time and any assistant costs (he is probably not familiar with the studio and doesn't want to spend time on figuring things out).
As a result it turns into 4-6hr session plus assistant costs, which he has not budgeted for. He then says he will pay later and you don't see him again as he cannot get his files for free.
There is no "known" setup as every-ones requirements are different. Even song-to-song. Knowledgeable engineers will cut the time down but will charge. Surprisingly not many amps sound the same way the clients imagine it. So they try other options. And they don't think in complex terms because studio reality to get a sound is usually different to what was actually done (the "engineering secrets" ).
We offered re-amp'ing in the beginning as a service, then to minimise the costs it was done off-hours by a trainee. Still wasn't worth it. So we only do it as part of a fine-tune of a tracking session or in the mix.
Been there - done that.
Old 25th May 2020
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri Kogan View Post
The main issue is that the client usually THINKS he know what sound he wants and how to get it. Then ones he sets up he realises its not quite what he wants, so he starts tinkering to fine-tune, and then complains it has taken them 4 hrs instead of 1. Plus, as in this case he does not consider setup/pull down time and any assistant costs (he is probably not familiar with the studio and doesn't want to spend time on figuring things out).
As a result it turns into 4-6hr session plus assistant costs, which he has not budgeted for. He then says he will pay later and you don't see him again as he cannot get his files for free.
There is no "known" setup as every-ones requirements are different. Even song-to-song. Knowledgeable engineers will cut the time down but will charge. Surprisingly not many amps sound the same way the clients imagine it. So they try other options. And they don't think in complex terms because studio reality to get a sound is usually different to what was actually done (the "engineering secrets" ).
We offered re-amp'ing in the beginning as a service, then to minimise the costs it was done off-hours by a trainee. Still wasn't worth it. So we only do it as part of a fine-tune of a tracking session or in the mix.
Been there - done that.
Absolutely. I fully agree.

What I was trying to say is that IF you do reamping for remote clients, you need to find a very efficient way to do it and you need to very clear about what's included, what one can expect and potential risks and that no files leaves the studio unpaid...

As you are pointing out, there are so many potential pitfalls and you never know if it's going to fit the mix unless you do it as a part of the mixing process.

I am actually as we speak in the middle of a remix of an album where I have to reamp the bass, because the amp which has been working really well for most of the album just doesn't work in one song because it interferes with both one of the rhythm guitars and one of the synth, so I had to reamp the line recording with a different amp to make it work in the mix. A couple of hours extra work, but that's part of the job.

So I fully agree, reamping out of context is really risky no matter where it's done. But sometimes you are lucky and it can work really well.

I suppose that it's all about calculated risks for everyone involved.
Old 25th May 2020
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Bigsby View Post
Absolutely. I fully agree.

What I was trying to say is that IF you do reamping for remote clients, you need to find a very efficient way to do it and you need to very clear about what's included, what one can expect and potential risks and that no files leaves the studio unpaid...

As you are pointing out, there are so many potential pitfalls and you never know if it's going to fit the mix unless you do it as a part of the mixing process.

I am actually as we speak in the middle of a remix of an album where I have to reamp the bass, because the amp which has been working really well for most of the album just doesn't work in one song because it interferes with both one of the rhythm guitars and one of the synth, so I had to reamp the line recording with a different amp to make it work in the mix. A couple of hours extra work, but that's part of the job.

So I fully agree, reamping out of context is really risky no matter where it's done. But sometimes you are lucky and it can work really well.

I suppose that it's all about calculated risks for everyone involved.
Absolutely. Has to be in a context and sufficient time has to be allocated.
We did that and tracking for our clients remotely in the UK and the US. But they were watching the proceedings via Skype and commented on results. Then we uploaded to the Cloud.
Old 25th May 2020
  #25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Bigsby View Post

So I fully agree, reamping out of context is really risky no matter where it's done. But sometimes you are lucky and it can work really well.

I suppose that it's all about calculated risks for everyone involved.
For the ReAmp service I was given (by the way got great sounding files the NEXT DAY, truly amazing!) I sent the studio separate stereo stems of all instrument groups, di guitar tracks, as well a stereo stem of the guitar files I wanted reamped so the studio engineer can have an idea what sound I want. I was actually in the middle of mixing my song and realized the guitar sound was not quite working. So I sent them the stereo stems of all instrument groups in the current state of the Mixing process so they can dial in the sound in context of the mix.

Totally agree with Carl Bigsby, reamping outside the context of the mix is like shooting in the dark and hoping to hit the target.
Old 25th May 2020
  #26
Here for the gear
 

It seems as though it would realistically take 1/2 hour per track minimum to select an amp out of many choices, tweak the tone to suit the track, try a couple of passes to get the level set and maybe move the mic around a little. That, times 5 tracks is already two and a half hours. I know 5 x 3=15 but I think thatโ€™s not a reasonable expectation. As you are experienced at recording it should be clear that the time adds up in little bits when working in the studio. It would likely take you 10-15 minutes just to get in, get oriented and get comfortable. Not to mention The time spent loading the track into the studioโ€™s computer and setting up the console. Three hours doesnโ€™t sound unreasonable to me.

Last edited by fclum; 26th May 2020 at 12:08 AM.. Reason: Spelling
Old 28th May 2020
  #27
Lives for gear
 
latestflavor's Avatar
 

Years ago I took a mobile recording setup (laptop, ad/da, mics and re-amping gear) into Ultrasound in NYC. Brought a guitar as well as some tracks i wanted re-amped. Canโ€™t beat the rate with all those amps. The rooms are somewhat treated.
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