The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Why do Cab IR's seem lacking?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #91
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
If speakers show large amounts of distortion, this means studio monitors have this problem too.

My monitors don't distort. My Sennheiser HD600 is also free from distortion.
Wanna bet?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #92
Good headphones and monitors should not result in any distortion. You cannot hear it only unless you have an impedance problem.

See for example the specs of my HD600 which is superb:
https://www.cnet.com/products/sennheiser-hd-600/specs/

0.1 % THD.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #93
Lives for gear
That's correct, they should not add distortion.

However, they do. The best distortion figures I've seen from a speaker were something like 0.05% THD, and that was a high-end 10" PA speaker being run at milli-watt levels, and it only managed it over a frequency range of a couple of octaves.

If you turn up the power, 1% THD is easily possible. I got that particular speaker to exhibit 40% THD by dropping a 70V RMS sine sweep into it.


The quoted 0.1%THD for the HD600s is an entirely useless figure. At what drive level was this achieved? What frequency?

I have some super-cheap headphones around here somewhere, and I'm certain I could get them to show less harmonic distortion if I was careful.


Chris
Old 2 weeks ago
  #94
Simply send a pure sine wave trough quality monitors and/or headphones and listen. If you're hearing overtones, something is faulty. Monitors and headphones, if the impedance is right, should have extremely low THD you won't notice at all. People use them for mixing and mastering. This allows them to notice distortion in the signal or other issues.

Good test for your ears:
Old 2 weeks ago
  #95
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
Simply send a pure sine wave trough quality monitors and/or headphones and listen. If you're hearing overtones, something is faulty. Monitors and headphones, if the impedance is right, should have extremely low THD you won't notice at all. People use them for mixing and mastering. This allows them to notice distortion in the signal or other issues. Saying a monitor distorts the signal is utter bull****.
Prove it.

Download REW (it's free) and do the measurements. I have a selection of nice speakers here, including those high-end 10" PA speakers, which I could measure, but I'm certain you won't bother with any measurements except your own.

So, get the software, connect up a mic, and run the sweeps. The typical distortion level of a solid-state amp is about 0.01%THD. Anything over that must be the speakers.

Chris

PS - Impedance is entirely irrelevant to this discussion. Class AB amps usually show slightly higher distortion at very low impedances (2ohm), but we're talking about speakers here.

PPS - Looks like you've edited your post.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #96
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris661 View Post
Prove it.

Download REW (it's free) and do the measurements. I have a selection of nice speakers here, including those high-end 10" PA speakers, which I could measure, but I'm certain you won't bother with any measurements except your own.

So, get the software, connect up a mic, and run the sweeps. The typical distortion level of a solid-state amp is about 0.01%THD. Anything over that must be the speakers.
Don't have the time at the moment. Maybe one day. But there's already so much you can find on this subject online. Carefully tested. Not sure if my test would help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris661 View Post
PS - Impedance is entirely irrelevant to this discussion. Class AB amps usually show slightly higher distortion at very low impedances (2ohm), but we're talking about speakers here.
No it's not. Many people are having problems by distorting their headphones because their soundcard is offering too high impedance and their headphones are too low on impedance.

If your speakers or headphones are distorting you simply have a problem. They should not distort. Or do you really think all engineers are listening to distorted speakers where every sine wave sounds like a square wave?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #97
Lives for gear
 
Yuri Kogan's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
Don't have the time at the moment. Maybe one day. But there's already so much you can find on this subject online. Carefully tested. Not sure if my test would help.



No it's not. Many people are having problems by distorting their headphones because their soundcard is offering too high impedance and their headphones are too low on impedance.

If your speakers or headphones are distorting you simply have a problem. They should not distort. Or do you really think all engineers are listening to distorted speakers where every sine wave sounds like a square wave?
Sound-card then feed ANALOGUE headphone amps, which in turn feed HPhones.
Now headphones are just small speakers in an enclosure. And ALL speakers exhibit distortion at certain frequencies due to the nature of them. Some more, some less but its just the nature of things. Design of the amp has a lot to do with it. f you watch some youtube vid (2-3min) about damping factors... things will become somewhat clearer.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #98
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
If your speakers or headphones are distorting you simply have a problem. They should not distort. Or do you really think all engineers are listening to distorted speakers where every sine wave sounds like a square wave?
Yes, all engineers are listening to distorted speakers.
The distortion isn't so severe as to make a sine wave into a square wave. As I said earlier, I've measured speakers at 0.05% THD if you're being really really gentle.

Turn up the power, and it's easy to get single- or double-digit THD figures.

I've measured this time and time again, even with high-end speakers.


Remember, distortion isn't necessarily the sort of thing you'll get with a guitar pedal.


Chris

PS - Some reading: http://www.neumann-kh-line.com/neuma...2578B20039968C
Those curves suggest fairly low distortion, but there certainly still is some.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #99
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri Kogan View Post
Design of the amp has a lot to do with it. f you watch some youtube vid (2-3min) about damping factors... things will become somewhat clearer.
Well, we're talking about distortion in speakers here.

An amplifier with a non-zero output impedance will have knock-on effects on the frequency response of the speaker, which in turn will alter the distortion profile.

Either way, though, the fact is that speakers introduce harmonic distortion, which is proportional to drive level.

Chris
Old 2 weeks ago
  #100
The overtones are super, super low, because I can't detect any when using a pure sine wave on playback. So my ears can't detect it on my Equator powered monitors and Sennheiser HD600 headphones.

If there's distortion (sure, in a analog signal there's always a small amount of THD) it is so low it is ignorable.

The only thing that might be interesting is some voodoo happening in 12" guitar speakers... But I think the one thing adds to the overtones: the power amp. It also adds compression (which is caused by overdriven circuit). And these things can easily be simulated digitally.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #101
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
I love it when a rookie tries to step up to the big leagues in a technical discussion. There are technical sharks in these here waters, shallow enders beware, you have entered the deep end of the pool.

Anyway, my Focal speakers distort noticeably when I turn them up with a DI'd bass. They are not broken. But it is ear-catching.
Old 1 week ago
  #102
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
The overtones are super, super low, because I can't detect any when using a pure sine wave on playback. So my ears can't detect it on my Equator powered monitors and Sennheiser HD600 headphones.

If there's distortion (sure, in a analog signal there's always a small amount of THD) it is so low it is ignorable.

The only thing that might be interesting is some voodoo happening in 12" guitar speakers... But I think the one thing adds to the overtones: the power amp. It also adds compression (which is caused by overdriven circuit). And these things can easily be simulated digitally.
Your unwillingness to learn bewilders me.

1 - Turn the level up a bit, then, and perhaps you'll hear the overtones. Did you do the sine tests in the video you posted? I found I was at 3% THD at 500Hz and 5% at 100Hz before I could definitely say that I was hearing overtones - I closed/opened my eyes as the video suggested.

2 - There IS distortion. Please stop denying it in the face of overwhelming evidence. The graphs I posted for the 12" guitar speaker show 40% THD at moderate power inputs. I can produce more graphs, if you like, of not-guitar-speakers which also show distortion.

3 - The power amp I used in the distortion test was a Crown MA12000i. I'd suggest you look that one up - it's a top-end amp from an excellent manufacturer, and you can buy one right now for just 29x the cost of your Sennheiser headphones. I promise you there was no compression, and minimal distortion, happening within the power amp. It's literally the reason I chose to use that amplifier.

Chris
Old 1 week ago
  #103
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris661 View Post
Your unwillingness to learn bewilders me.

1 - Turn the level up a bit, then, and perhaps you'll hear the overtones. Did you do the sine tests in the video you posted? I found I was at 3% THD at 500Hz and 5% at 100Hz before I could definitely say that I was hearing overtones - I closed/opened my eyes as the video suggested.

2 - There IS distortion. Please stop denying it in the face of overwhelming evidence. The graphs I posted for the 12" guitar speaker show 40% THD at moderate power inputs. I can produce more graphs, if you like, of not-guitar-speakers which also show distortion.

3 - The power amp I used in the distortion test was a Crown MA12000i. I'd suggest you look that one up - it's a top-end amp from an excellent manufacturer, and you can buy one right now for just 29x the cost of your Sennheiser headphones. I promise you there was no compression, and minimal distortion, happening within the power amp. It's literally the reason I chose to use that amplifier.

Chris
How did you send the signal to the amp from your computer? What interface are you using?
Old 1 week ago
  #104
Lives for gear
It was a digital mixing desk - a QSC TM30Pro, connected to the computer via USB.

All operated well within limits - the desk is capable of +22dBU before clipping, and I didn't get close to that as the speaker cone would've launched across the room. It's a big amplifier.

Chris
Old 1 week ago
  #105
I ran a test running a clean sine wave from the Reason Thor synth running through my Scarlett interface into the Equator monitors (see https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/equator-audio-d8). Volume was at three quarters of the maximum, needed to wear earplugs (-30 db) and volume was still too intense to be bearable for anything longer than a few seconds.

I recorded the tones on my Sony D-50 recording using the build-in electret condenser mics.

Brought these in Ableton Live, set the gain of all samples at -3 db and checked the harmonics on the spectrum analyser.

Here's what I found:
440 hz at -3 db
second harmonic at -53 db
third harmonic at -49 db

110 hz at -3 db
no detectable harmonics

1760 hz at -3 db
second harmonic at -65 db
third harmonic at -58 db

3520 hz at -3 db
second harmonic at -56 db
third harmonic at -73 db

All harmonics are not detectable by ear. The loudest harmonic I found was 45 db lower than the original sine. Every 3 db lower, means half the volume.

And these are lower than the noise floor of a guitar amp, see for example Typical noise floor on guitar amplifier??

The harmonics caused by a speaker cannot be detected by ear (and we're talking perfect situation here: isolated sine waves, so no already distorted complex tones), they even lay below the noise floor of a guitar amp.

If you push the speakers to the max, sure distortion goes up. My Sennheiser HD600 headphones are as clean as it should be, but of course I can overdrive then by sending a signal through it that's simply too loud. This will harm the cones though. Is this happening with guitar speakers? Yes sometimes, people might use a more powerfull amp which the speakers can't handle. The speaker than 'breaks up' but that is not a nice tone. That's not something you ever want to hear in an IR.

IRs can be convoluted at a reasonable level. Preferable using a transistor amp, although additional distortion will not be captured in the IR since the IR can't capture overtones, since it measures only one frequency in relation to itself.
Attached Thumbnails
Why do Cab IR's seem lacking?-3520-hz.jpg   Why do Cab IR's seem lacking?-1760-hz.jpg   Why do Cab IR's seem lacking?-440-hz.jpg   Why do Cab IR's seem lacking?-110-hz.jpg  
Old 1 week ago
  #106
Lives for gear
It would've been easier to run the sweeps - just run the headphone output of the Sony into your interface.

This'll help you calculate your distortion percentages:
http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-thd.htm

FWIW, the harmonics are clearly visible on the 110Hz spectrum.

Chris

PS - Speakers will show distortion even if they're in no danger of burning out.
Old 1 week ago
  #107
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris661 View Post
This'll help you calculate your distortion percentages:
http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-thd.htm
The highest harmonic I found was at - 45 db under root. That means a THD of 0.5623413 %

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris661 View Post
FWIW, the harmonics are clearly visible on the 110Hz spectrum.

Chris

PS - Speakers will show distortion even if they're in no danger of burning out.
You are right, they didn't look like peaks because they are rounded but that's because these are low frequencies. I found this:
110 hz at - 3 db
second harmonic at - 54 db
third harmonic at - 66 db
Old 1 week ago
  #108
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyxx View Post
I love it when a rookie tries to step up to the big leagues in a technical discussion. There are technical sharks in these here waters, shallow enders beware, you have entered the deep end of the pool.

Anyway, my Focal speakers distort noticeably when I turn them up with a DI'd bass. They are not broken. But it is ear-catching.

It's entertaining when people talk past each other for a while... I do like when people can learn things that help them make better recordings or understand what is happening with their gear and instruments.

Besides harmonic and inter-modulation distortions, there are issues of audibility and confirmation bias going on here. Making simulations sound more like physical equipment is a laudable endeavor because realities of budget, space, and neighbors often preclude using combo amps to record guitar. Sometimes, the final mixes sound different between the methods. Sometimes, they're indistinguishable....

There are many factors too - playing technique, style, and the listener all play into "close enough". My boy's godfather could reliably hear out past 20kHz and I usually listened very carefully to what he thought of tweeters he was designing with. I may not hear the differences in most situations, but they were pretty obvious to him (and he did have preferences, not just a clinical standard).





-tINY

Old 1 week ago
  #109
Gear Guru
 
monkeyxx's Avatar
Yeah it's always nice when things come together harmoniously, too. Hard to argue with that.

I was wondering "why" my IR cab sims don't sound like my "real" amp recordings and this thread has given me some clues, maybe even some answers.

I am wondering if some of the more advanced speaker sims such as the Two Notes and possibly the IK/UAD, not sure, use some kind of distortion model to enhance the IR's or maybe just abandon IR altogether. Not sure how the models are designed.

I was also wondering "why" my monitors keep getting so distorted. Pretty simple answer, they are being pushed to their maximum limits. This thread confirmed that for me.

Learning is such a wonderful thing and I am grateful to the people who take the time to share their knowledge.
Old 1 week ago
  #110
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris661 View Post
Thanks for taking the time to read my work.

I must point out that I did, in fact, run the sweeps at a variety of different levels, ranging from 1W to 256W.

I found this on the Wiki page about inter-modulation distortion:


If you could expand on why it is that complex waveforms are required (mathematically, it doesn't appear to be the case), that would make interesting reading.

Regards,
Chris
You're welcome. Something I think you missed in my post - or maybe I didn't articulate it as well as I had thought - is that there's a HUGE difference between running sine wave sweeps at a bunch of different levels and doing testing using a complex waveform and a signal that is dynamically varying between different levels, which is what you need if you're really trying to qualitatively analyze the behavior of a guitar speaker.

And yeah, devising a proper test is really difficult.

Why are complex waveforms required? Think about it for a moment - it should be obvious if you understand guitar speakers.

Unlike other types of audio speakers, modern guitar speakers are all about harmonic distortion. What designers of conventional speakers toil to eliminate is embraced by guitar speaker designers - it turns the whole world of speaker design on its head.

All dynamic speakers have a very high incidence of distortion. Conventional designers seek to eliminate it; guitar speaker designers design with it.

Guitar is a polyphonic instrument, so the speaker will be called on to reproduce more than one note, with its attendant harmonics and distortion, at a time. (That's a complex waveform) Guitar speakers, with their predominantly paper cones, tend to produce a significant amount of IM. The question is, what will the tonal quality of the IM be, because it will form a significant factor in the tone of the speaker. This is, of course, largely divorced from the frequency response.

One other kicker is that, while most conventional tests employing complex waveforms use pink or white noise, that doesn't work here because it's too random to support the kind of analysis required.

EDIT:

One other, somewhat more metaphysical thing - It is impossible to truly do a mathematical analysis of art.
Old 1 week ago
  #111
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
..
And yeah, devising a proper test is really difficult.
..

..
...embraced by guitar speaker designers - it turns the whole world of speaker design on its head.
..


Yup...




-tINY

Old 1 week ago
  #112
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Guitar is a polyphonic instrument, so the speaker will be called on to reproduce more than one note, with its attendant harmonics and distortion, at a time. (That's a complex waveform) Guitar speakers, with their predominantly paper cones, tend to produce a significant amount of IM.
Sound in real life is polyphonic indeed but our ears and speakers can only capture or produce a sequence of vibrations. That's why you only see one waveform when recording on your screen. Just one frequency with a certain amplitude at a specific moment, that's all. This is exactly what a IR reproduces.

A speaker can only produce one vibration at the same time. Like our ears. It's just a matter of a vibration going back and forth between a plus and a minus with in the middle ilde, silence.
Old 1 week ago
  #113
Lives for gear
 
Fay Smearing's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
Sound in real life is polyphonic indeed but our ears and speakers can only capture or produce a sequence of vibrations. That's why you only see one waveform when recording on your screen. Just one frequency with a certain amplitude at a specific moment, that's all. This is exactly what a IR reproduces.

A speaker can only produce one vibration at the same time. Like our ears. It's just a matter of a vibration going back and forth between a plus and a minus with in the middle ilde, silence.
Strange assertions. Maybe just not worded very well.
Old 1 week ago
  #114
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fay Smearing View Post
Strange assertions. Maybe just not worded very well.
Yeah, I did wonder if it was a translation thing.

It's all got a bit too philosophical for me - I've presented some data, and some of the discussion has been interesting.

Enjoy.

Chris
Old 1 week ago
  #115
Lives for gear
 
Yuri Kogan's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris661 View Post
Yeah, I did wonder if it was a translation thing.

It's all got a bit too philosophical for me - I've presented some data, and some of the discussion has been interesting.

Enjoy.

Chris
Yes, me too. You provided the data, which even non-technical people knew for decades. So you have the concept and the scientific proof. The rest is just weird possibly, maybe , highly likely...
But thanks for actually taking the time (quite a bit of it) and doing it.
Old 1 week ago
  #116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
If speakers show large amounts of distortion, this means studio monitors have this problem too.

My monitors don't distort. My Sennheiser HD600 is also free from distortion.
Your reading comprehension is not good.

To reiterate:

Guitar speakers have design goals that are somewhat opposite from your studio monitor speakers. Monitor speakers are designed to be as clean and phase coherent as possible. Guitar spekers are intentionally designed to generate distortion is specific ways that it has been determined that guitar players think "sounds good".

And you're wrong about your monitors, anyway - ALL dynamic speakers distort. All of them. In any playback chain, be it a monitor system at Abbey Road or a $100,000 hi-fi system in a billionaire audiophile's home, the speakers generate more distortion than the whole rest of the system put together.

If speakers didn't generate distortion there would be no reason to have different kinds of speakers because they would all sound the same. But they don't.

BTW, your HD600 also distorts. You just don't recognize it as distortion.

Compare your Sennheisers to a set of Stax Electrostatics. You will hear the difference. Since the Stax are electrostatic, not dynamic, they have far lower distortion. It's like the difference between a U87 condenser and an SM57 dynamic.
Old 1 week ago
  #117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
Sound in real life is polyphonic indeed but our ears and speakers can only capture or produce a sequence of vibrations. That's why you only see one waveform when recording on your screen. Just one frequency with a certain amplitude at a specific moment, that's all. This is exactly what a IR reproduces.

A speaker can only produce one vibration at the same time. Like our ears. It's just a matter of a vibration going back and forth between a plus and a minus with in the middle ilde, silence.
You are wrong.

You really don't understand how acoustics and sound in general work.

I you were correct the we would only be able to hear on frequency at a time. But we can obviously hear many different frequencies at the same time. The electrical signal generated by a good omnidirectional microphone is a more or less accurate representation of the pressure/velocity state of the diaphragm at any given moment in time.However this instantaneous pressure state is meaningless in an audio context without also referencing the changing pressure states preceding and following it over enough time to give it context. Taken together and analyzed over time this chain of pressure state can easily represent many different simultaneous frequencies.

The electrical output of a microphone is no different.

I'd suggest that you try and wrap your head around concepts such as multiplexing and heterodyning. You also might try perusing a copy of F. Alton Everett's Master Handbook of Acoustics.

If you're really interested in speakers try a subscription to Voice Coil Magazine, the journal of the speaker industry.

Quote:
A speaker can only produce one vibration at the same time.
And actually you're wrong again. If a dynamic speaker was a perfect piston that might seem to be true but even then it's not and most speakers are not perfect pistons*. Most speakers use a cardboard or similar material for the cone, and such materials flex. Also, since speakers cones are, well, cone shaped, different parts of the cone tend to resonate at different frequencies depending on the diameter at a given distance from the center.

If you look at an audio waveform on a lab oscilloscope you'll see the lower frequencies with the higher frequencies "floating" on the LF waveform. What you're seeing is different sounds being reproduced at the same time. An analog representation of pressure states in the air.


* - I know of a couple of drivers intendeds for subwoofer use that attempt to approximate a perfect piston and do a credible job, but those LF drivers are incapable of reproducing anything much above 200 HZ, if that.

Last edited by John Eppstein; 1 week ago at 10:27 PM..
Old 1 week ago
  #118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
Good headphones and monitors should not result in any distortion. You cannot hear it only unless you have an impedance problem.

See for example the specs of my HD600 which is superb:
https://www.cnet.com/products/sennheiser-hd-600/specs/

0.1 % THD.
Oy vey!

You distortion "spec" is meaningless. It's nothing more tha a figure published by their advertising department to impress people like you.

What was the full spec, or did they even tell you? The "full" spec, such as it is, should be something like "0.1% THD @ 1kHz, 10 mW input" And your phones may very well do that. However, most people do not listen to phones with only a 1k pure sine wave, they don't listen at only one optimum level (chosen for lowest distortion), and that "spec" tell you NOTHING WHATSOEVER what those phones do when presented with a complex waveform containing may frequencies mixed together of at dynamically changing levels.

The 1kHz "standard" was chosen by manufacturers because it is a very easy frequency for most audio devices to reproduce and it's more or less in the middle of the perceived range of hearing.

In other words, a 1kHz sine wave test tone will make most audio equipment look good while actuality telling you much about how it behaves where it counts.

And that spec tells you nothing about the spectrum of the harmonic distortion being produced. I would be willing to be that you probably could not recognize distortion in a music signal with 10% THD if that distortion was all 2nd harmonic. you might very well notice a tonal difference, but you probably would not recognize it as distortion because 2nd harmonic is fully consonant with the fundamental, being the 1st octave harmonic. You might recognize it as a "warming up" or perhaps "fattening" of the sound, if you noticed it at all.

I also notice that Sennheiser doesn't say a thing about IM distortion, which might be a far more interesting figure.
Old 1 week ago
  #119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raaphorst View Post
Simply send a pure sine wave trough quality monitors and/or headphones and listen. If you're hearing overtones, something is faulty. Monitors and headphones, if the impedance is right, should have extremely low THD you won't notice at all. People use them for mixing and mastering. This allows them to notice distortion in the signal or other issues.

Good test for your ears:
I hear distortion in the basic audio in that video clip. It's pretty useless.

What a crock.

You can't measure distortion in a speaker with a pure sine wave. Not accurately, anyway.

Speakers are not intended for listening to pure sine waves. Speakers are intended to reproduce complex waveforms made up of multiple frequencies. You can only know how the speaker actually behaves by testing under similar circumstances - which is difficult but not impossible.

To really test a speaker for distortion you'd need access to a really good rig for analyzing intermodulation distortion - which, over a sufficient range of combinations of frequencies, might actually give you a reasonable picture of how well a speaker does, distortion-wise. If you could understand the results. And to really understand how the speaker behaves you'd also need to add dynamics into the equation.

However the readout from such testing would almost certainly be incomprehensible to a non-technical person such as yourself - you would probably take one look at the moderately thick book of various graphs and give up.

BTW, "People" might use phones for "mastering". Actual mastering engineers do not.
Old 1 week ago
  #120
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
* - I know of a couple of drivers intendeds for subwoofer use that attempt to approximate a perfect piston and do a credible job, but those LF drivers are incapable of reproducing anything much above 200 HZ, if that.
Minor correction: it's possible to get to over 1kHz with the diaphragm acting as a piston. Hard metal cones manage it regularly. Seas make some good examples of that sort of driver - I'm listening to the H1252 drivers as we speak, crossed to some compression drivers at 900Hz.

However, the price to pay is a series of sharp breakup modes where the cone literally rings like a bell. It takes some work in the crossover to really stamp out that ringing, but the results are worth it.

Chris
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump