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More pro sounding guitars?
Old 8th August 2019
  #1
Gear Nut
More pro sounding guitars?

So I've been recording in some fashion for the last 5-6 years and done some heavier records. I think the basic level for starting on heavy guitars is to do 2 tracks panned hard left and right to get that big full sound. I feel like it sounds pretty decent, but not quite pro-level.

I was wondering if anyone had any advice on where to go from there for the next big leap. I have read some articles and watched some videos and I know sometimes there are room mics involved, DI signals, 2 amps recorded through an ABY. Does anyone have any advice on getting a bigger, more full distorted guitar sound? Lately I've been using an SM57 and MD421 through an analog mixer, then mono out to my interface.

-Daz
Old 8th August 2019
  #2
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tedtan's Avatar
 

Bigger, wider, more full guitars come from the differences between the two sides. Try using different chord voicings, different guitars, different different amps, speakers/cabs, different mics,different mic positions, etc. oin order to get a second track that compliments the first track rather than duplicates it exactly.
Old 8th August 2019
  #3
Gear Nut
Quote:
Originally Posted by tedtan View Post
Bigger, wider, more full guitars come from the differences between the two sides. Try using different chord voicings, different guitars, different different amps, speakers/cabs, different mics,different mic positions, etc. oin order to get a second track that compliments the first track rather than duplicates it exactly.
Makes sense. Thanks! Do you think it's worth having a room mic or some kind of non-close mic on the cab?
Old 8th August 2019
  #4
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Owen L T's Avatar
Unless your room sound particularly nice - ie a well-proportioned, acoustically sound live room - then, no, adding in "real" room sound from an ambient mic is not likely to be as helpful to the sound as simply adding some well-chosen reverb - be it small-room reverb or otherwise.

It's all going to be down to, in approximate order: the quality of the guitar part (including, the rhythm and voicing); the quality of the playing; the choice of guitar tone (including pickup position and amp/cab sim); how you EQ it to fit in the mix; and last, oh, yeah, compression, reverb and other seasoning.

Worth mentioning: having "double-tracked guitar panned left and right" as your starting point is kind of a crutch, that could be preventing you from making better choices regarding the quality of the guitar part itself. Hard-panned double-tracked guitars are ... a flavour of guitar. But, right off the bat, that means it doesn't sound like "a guitar", as that's not where it's placed in the mix. Maybe you'd have to work a little harder on the arrangement/production if you didn't fill up the stereo spectrum with a hard-panned guitar part. It's kind of like sticking a keyboard pad into a production early on; sure, it makes things sound less bare-bones - but it also makes it easier to avoid having to come up with more musical solutions.
Old 9th August 2019
  #5
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BIG BUDDHA's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dazmo View Post
Makes sense. Thanks! Do you think it's worth having a room mic or some kind of non-close mic on the cab?
close mics for sure.

2 inches in front of the 12 inch speaker, and looking right at it.

57s and 421s are fine.

Rock guitars are all about SOUNDS, and combinations of classic Guitars and Amps. Like a Gibson 335 into a Messa boogie 22 mk1. thats a sound, or a Strat into a Fender 100 watt tube twin, thats a Sound.

and like the other post said, if you double a Part, then try a different GTR, or change the pick up choice on the same GTR, or change the amp, or the amp settings slightly. that all helps.

Buddha
Old 9th August 2019
  #6
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sfilipee's Avatar
 

The sound itself appearing more professional or not doesn't have to do with going thru a classic tube amp or not, a lot of disco, soul and funk records which sound amazing were DI.

A lot of heavier music now is also being recorded DI so it can be reamp'd and tried on multiple combinations of amps and pedals later, saving studio time.

Every tip above is a must try when recording guitars, and you should get into it, maybe even book a day in a studio to try all that out and see what suits you, but I think what you're after is a good mixing job.
Old 9th August 2019
  #7
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tedtan's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dazmo View Post
Makes sense. Thanks! Do you think it's worth having a room mic or some kind of non-close mic on the cab?
For modern metal guitars, no. Modern metal is pretty dry, so I wouldn't add any ambience up front; I'd save it for the mix (if I used any at all).

For other styles, only if you have a great sounding room. Otherwise, I'd still wait to add any ambience in the mix using something like Altiverb or Ocean Way.
Old 10th August 2019
  #8
Gear Maniac
Try double mic'ing the guitar amp. I use a 57 and a warm audio 47jr. I make sure to place them right to avoid phase. I record each mic simultaneously but to seperate tracks. However once recorded it is treated as one guitar not 2. Once i find my blend that i like I buss them together and process them as a single guitar. The tonal differences in a dynamic and a condenser are pretty big and blending the 2 together really yields a great sound. I dont always blend the 2 mics i just find what sounds and works best for each song.
Old 10th August 2019
  #9
Gear Head
 
cat alley's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dazmo View Post
I was wondering if anyone had any advice on where to go from there for the next big leap. I have read some articles and watched some videos and I know sometimes there are room mics involved, DI signals, 2 amps recorded through an ABY. Does anyone have any advice on getting a bigger, more full distorted guitar sound? Lately I've been using an SM57 and MD421 through an analog mixer, then mono out to my interface.
I think the most important elements to consider are the guitar and the guitar amplifier. Diezel VH4 is my personal favorite for modern heavy guitar sounds - there are many great options. Assuming that you have those covered, an SM57 can sound outstanding when going through a great mic preamp. It can also sound pretty boring if going through a mediocre mic preamp. The API 512c is a good option for that application, among many others. Make sure your console's preamps complement your microphones nicely. If you have that covered, adding a hardware compressor to your chain might help you achieve the sound you have in mind more quickly. EQ adjustments might help too, but, I wouldn't rely on aggressive EQ moves to create the desired sound. Rather, to complement an already satisfying tone.

Other approaches already mentioned like mixing different timbers or even adding reverb might help. However, if I understood correctly, you are not completely satisfied with the guitar tone you're getting. If that is the case, adding other elements might not be the best way to achieve what you're looking for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Owen L T View Post
Worth mentioning: having "double-tracked guitar panned left and right" as your starting point is kind of a crutch, that could be preventing you from making better choices regarding the quality of the guitar part itself. Hard-panned double-tracked guitars are ... a flavour of guitar. But, right off the bat, that means it doesn't sound like "a guitar", as that's not where it's placed in the mix. Maybe you'd have to work a little harder on the arrangement/production if you didn't fill up the stereo spectrum with a hard-panned guitar part. It's kind of like sticking a keyboard pad into a production early on; sure, it makes things sound less bare-bones - but it also makes it easier to avoid having to come up with more musical solutions.
Not necessarily. We don't know what genre of music or sound aesthetic Daz is going for. This technique is common practice in many rock and metal music settings. When producing a guitar-riff-based metal or modern rock track, it could be counterproductive to leave open space in the mix for other elements during production or even composition when ultimately there will be a hard-panned guitar on L and R channels playing the same riff.
Old 10th August 2019
  #10
less gain often gives a bigger sound, double tracking is actually a lot harder than many people think, you have to be a really tight player and on the ball. I always prefer real amps over sims as well but that's another whole can of worms that people get very upset about, being able to control the tone by moving the mic around is important to me.
Old 11th August 2019
  #11
Quote:
More pro sounding guitars?
I think the basic level for starting on heavy guitars is to do 2 tracks panned hard left and right to get that big full sound.
Thew guitar sound and stereo placements of the guitars are dependent on each mix the guitars are placed in.
The same exact guitar sound can sound good in one song and bad in another song. So 'pro sounding' guitars can be any guitar sound, as long as it fits that mix.

If you are not getting the sound you want for every single mix you are mixing, then try different approaches, like mix placement, miking a different speaker, angle of mic, placing the cabinet in another area of the room, different guitar amp settings, different pedal settings, if you are using a pedal stomp effects.

As far as just placing the guitars hard left and right. You should think about the mix, just like a 3D painting. You can and should place guitars and every other instrument, so they appear to be in a 3D sound stage and in their own space. An example is placing them back left, back right, front left front right, 50% middle left, 50% middle right, Back center, front center, mid center, 75% front right, 75% back right, 75% front left and so on and so on ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Old 12th August 2019
  #12
Lives for gear
 

Dirty little secret from the pros:
Heavy metal producers HEAVILY edit the guitars with their DAW so that all the guitar tracks are perfectly quantized on the beats. After a few hours of edition, you can use a well adjusted gate to clean up the sound. Then scoop a bit the sound and use a high pass filter at 50Hz to give a little room to the bass which also needs to be quantized and gated.
Quantizing, gating and scooping with your DAW will probably yield the result you are seeking
Old 12th August 2019
  #13
Gear Head
 
cat alley's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by numero6 View Post
Dirty little secret from the pros:
Heavy metal producers HEAVILY edit the guitars with their DAW so that all the guitar tracks are perfectly quantized on the beats.
There is that. But, there are also proficient and experienced musicians.
Old 12th August 2019
  #14
Gear Nut
Thank you to everyone for taking the time to help me out.

I do have some experience recording, so things like mic placement, bussing 2 mics down to 1 channel, etc... aren't totally foreign. That said, I don't have a really great mic pre. I has some very modest ones, but I've been told it's worth the investment.

I've visited larger studios where they'd work with as many as 14 guitar tracks (in the box) to achieve what sounds like 1 guitar, but it sounds great... They had close mics, far mics, and what looked like one guitar going to some kind of AB-Y and being played through 2 or 3 amps at once. This sparked my train of thought that ultimately lead to creating this thread.

I guess I was wondering if there was a tried and true next step that these big studios are doing that us home studio folks don't have the resource, time, skills or patience for.

-Daz
Old 12th August 2019
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dazmo View Post
Thank you to everyone for taking the time to help me out.

I do have some experience recording, so things like mic placement, bussing 2 mics down to 1 channel, etc... aren't totally foreign. That said, I don't have a really great mic pre. I has some very modest ones, but I've been told it's worth the investment.

I've visited larger studios where they'd work with as many as 14 guitar tracks (in the box) to achieve what sounds like 1 guitar, but it sounds great... They had close mics, far mics, and what looked like one guitar going to some kind of AB-Y and being played through 2 or 3 amps at once. This sparked my train of thought that ultimately lead to creating this thread.

I guess I was wondering if there was a tried and true next step that these big studios are doing that us home studio folks don't have the resource, time, skills or patience for.

-Daz

No snark intended, but the biggest pieces of the puzzle you are missing is the pro studio and the pro recording and mix engineers. Gear companies would love it if you believed a mic preamp or xyz gadget was the shortcut to a pro recording, but in the grand scheme of things, that’s a very small piece of the puzzle.

Maybe if you posted some examples of recordings you are looking to match that would help.
Old 12th August 2019
  #16
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dazmo View Post
I guess I was wondering if there was a tried and true next step that these big studios are doing that us home studio folks don't have the resource, time, skills or patience for.

-Daz
This is your problem. You have to take the time to develop your skills and use your ears. At the end of the day there is no tried and true method. Every situation is different from the room to the mic selection to the player to the guitar to the amp etc...

All of these suggestions above are different avenues to obtain the results you want. But you will never get it looking for a tried and true shortcut. Great mixers and engineers can make great records with crap gear because they have taken the TIME and had the PATIENCE to develop there SKILLS.
Old 12th August 2019
  #17
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Hey op, (and somewhat referring to the above post) ,you might just follow every single piece of advice on earlier posts.....try every single thing out....and still not get what you're looking for.

Why?

Because you're not presenting the question in a focused way.

Start by identifying one.....one only for the moment....commercial track with guitar results you admire.

That is what you will dissect. That is the one you'll call around etc to find out EXACTLY how was tracked, edited, mixed, and mastered.

Next....you'll do those steps on your session as much as possible.

Then, you move to commercial track #2 . And so on.

That...is how you triangulate...in your own brain processing...how to "do" better guitars. And only your brain can decide when you get there and what exactly "better" guitars mean to you.

Simple engineering progress 101.....learn by watching....personal phone calls....visits face to face with those who create the actual specific tracks that jazz you.

Stuff like this is not done behind the protective wall of the internet imo.

After your work, hey, perhaps you'll discover that the guy on post #adcd ended up being closest to what was done on the commercial recordings.....determined by your brain only.

But as it is, this stuff is all over the place....because you haven't identified the commercial tracks that speak "professional" in your head.

As it is, you're just asking how to find a better brunette girlfriend....and none of the answers may pertain to what you're looking for.
Old 12th August 2019
  #18
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenoodle View Post
Hey op, (and somewhat referring to the above post) ,you might just follow every single piece of advice on earlier posts.....try every single thing out....and still not get what you're looking for.

Why?

Because you're not presenting the question in a focused way.

Start by identifying one.....one only for the moment....commercial track with guitar results you admire.

That is what you will dissect. That is the one you'll call around etc to find out EXACTLY how was tracked, edited, mixed, and mastered.

Next....you'll do those steps on your session as much as possible.

Then, you move to commercial track #2 . And so on.

That...is how you triangulate...in your own brain processing...how to "do" better guitars. And only your brain can decide when you get there and what exactly "better" guitars mean to you.

Simple engineering progress 101.....learn by watching....personal phone calls....visits face to face with those who create the actual specific tracks that jazz you.

Stuff like this is not done behind the protective wall of the internet imo.

After your work, hey, perhaps you'll discover that the guy on post #adcd ended up being closest to what was done on the commercial recordings.....determined by your brain only.

But as it is, this stuff is all over the place....because you haven't identified the commercial tracks that speak "professional" in your head.

As it is, you're just asking how to find a better brunette girlfriend....and none of the answers may pertain to what you're looking for.
To the OP this guy just gave you a step by step way to do exactly what i said you needed to do. He gave you a guide on a successful way to develop your skills. It will take some TIME and PATIENCE. but you will develop your skills well and what you learn will be invaluable to you.
Old 13th August 2019
  #19
Lives for gear
 

Dylan Carlson of Earth has the most massive electric guitar sounds I have ever heard. Although Earth 2 and some of the earlier records had more distorted guitar the records he made starting with Hex; Or Printing In The Infernal Method generally have a "cleaner" sound. And I think Earth's records starting with Hex, and Earth recently live, are as heavy as the earlier records. I reckon I might recommend listening to Earth to get some ideas.

Live, Dylan Carlson had two solid state heads, one of which was a Crate Powerblock, with one speaker cabinet for each, one of which I think was a small bass cabinet. One speaker cabinet was to the left of Adrienne Davies's drums and the other was on the right. Dylan Carlson had just a little bit of slow modulation.
Old 13th August 2019
  #20
Lives for gear
 
Jeff Hayat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dazmo View Post
So I've been recording in some fashion for the last 5-6 years and done some heavier records. I think the basic level for starting on heavy guitars is to do 2 tracks panned hard left and right to get that big full sound. I feel like it sounds pretty decent, but not quite pro-level.

I was wondering if anyone had any advice on where to go from there for the next big leap. I have read some articles and watched some videos and I know sometimes there are room mics involved, DI signals, 2 amps recorded through an ABY. Does anyone have any advice on getting a bigger, more full distorted guitar sound? Lately I've been using an SM57 and MD421 through an analog mixer, then mono out to my interface.

-Daz
Some good points thus far. And, some not so good. But this is GS - what did anyone expect?

First, you have to be happy with your sound, when you play through your amp, even before you grab a mic.

Are you? You haven't said.

If you are not yet at the point where you stand (or sit) in front of your amp, and think to yourself, "yeah, THIS is what I want baby!!!"... don't think the sound is going to get better when recorded.

If you are at that point, then there are many factors to consider, many of which were covered. I will harp on two, one of which was mentioned earlier. The room is all-knowing and all-seeing. It is, after the player, the single most important thing in the recording process. If your room is sub-par, you are starting out at a disadvantage.

Secondly, and this is something that most people don't get - the amp needs to be turned up loud. This is not always the case for every single amp, but is almost all the time, especially when you are recording heavy rock and metal guitar. As one ex., 100w Marshalls - whether it's a JMP, a Plexi, an 800... were not meant to be played @ 2. They were meant to played LOUD - @ much higher levels than most people would be able to do in their apt. If you can't crank the amp up, you are now at another disadvantage. See how these add up?

Mic positioning is another key, esp. f you use an SM57; just a smidge to the right, left, up or down, can make a difference in the tone. Have someone help you, by moving the mic while you play and monitor the to-be-recorded guitar signal, so you can find the sweet spot.

Find some good sounding pro-recorded guitar (searching yt for isolated guitar tracks is a good starting point), and try and match the EQ response. Nothing wrong with "copying" someone that way.

Get a good verb (the Relab 480 is a good bet here; there are other good options as well) and use a very short (almost no tail) room sound to add some depth.

Also, posting an ex. of what you have done so far might help.

Finally, this thread may offer some more insight:

Master of Puppets SHOOTOUT!

Cheers.
Old 13th August 2019
  #21
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Hayat View Post
Some good points thus far. And, some not so good. But this is GS - what did anyone expect?

First, you have to be happy with your sound, when you play through your amp, even before you grab a mic.

Are you? You haven't said.

If you are not yet at the point where you stand (or sit) in front of your amp, and think to yourself, "yeah, THIS is what I want baby!!!"... don't think the sound is going to get better when recorded.

If you are at that point, then there are many factors to consider, many of which were covered. I will harp on two, one of which was mentioned earlier. The room is all-knowing and all-seeing. It is, after the player, the single most important thing in the recording process. If your room is sub-par, you are starting out at a disadvantage.

Secondly, and this is something that most people don't get - the amp needs to be turned up loud. This is not always the case for every single amp, but is almost all the time, especially when you are recording heavy rock and metal guitar. As one ex., 100w Marshalls - whether it's a JMP, a Plexi, an 800... were not meant to be played @ 2. They were meant to played LOUD - @ much higher levels than most people would be able to do in their apt. If you can't crank the amp up, you are now at another disadvantage. See how these add up?

Mic positioning is another key, esp. f you use an SM57; just a smidge to the right, left, up or down, can make a difference in the tone. Have someone help you, by moving the mic while you play and monitor the to-be-recorded guitar signal, so you can find the sweet spot.

Find some good sounding pro-recorded guitar (searching yt for isolated guitar tracks is a good starting point), and try and match the EQ response. Nothing wrong with "copying" someone that way.

Get a good verb (the Relab 480 is a good bet here; there are other good options as well) and use a very short (almost no tail) room sound to add some depth.

Also, posting an ex. of what you have done so far might help.

Finally, this thread may offer some more insight:

Master of Puppets SHOOTOUT!

Cheers.
I completely agree with the loud amp philosophy. I've been around plenty of sessions over the centuries where amps were not loud (comparatively speaking) and guitar players/amps were in the same room at the same time as a basic track going down... and that's one thing.

But personally, any lead guitar I've ever overdubbed myself since around 1968 has always been with the Marshall stack or Fender stack or Sunn stack (well, those were too big to stack)....or even a Twin....out in the studio, wires up the hallway, and me sitting in the control room to play unless I needed to be right in front of the amp to get a feedback overdub.

I can't get context unless I track that way. Even if the solo isn't eventually intended to be overbearing and obnoxious. In fact, I can't even get in the mood or in the mindset of what I want in my track unless the amp is set up like that almost a zip code away sometimes.

Which maybe the op does already. Regardless, I agree with the point. Marty Stuart maybe wouldn't, but I do.
Old 13th August 2019
  #22
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenoodle View Post
I completely agree with the loud amp philosophy. I've been around plenty of sessions over the centuries where amps were not loud (comparatively speaking) and guitar players/amps were in the same room at the same time as a basic track going down... and that's one thing.

But personally, any lead guitar I've ever overdubbed myself since around 1968 has always been with the Marshall stack or Fender stack or Sunn stack (well, those were too big to stack)....or even a Twin....out in the studio, wires up the hallway, and me sitting in the control room to play unless I needed to be right in front of the amp to get a feedback overdub.

I can't get context unless I track that way. Even if the solo isn't eventually intended to be overbearing and obnoxious. In fact, I can't even get in the mood or in the mindset of what I want in my track unless the amp is set up like that almost a zip code away sometimes.

Which maybe the op does already. Regardless, I agree with the point. Marty Stuart maybe wouldn't, but I do.
I think you and the poster in front of you are missing the point. Its not about volume and loudness. Its about pushing the amp. I know a lot of great records are cut with small combo amps. The first 2 or 3 Zeppelin records page used a supro combo amp. A ten watt tube amp pushed to the brink will get you just as sweet a sound as a 100 watt amp will. If you want a stack sound just use a closed back cabinet. Loud is not what you are after its the sound of the circuits being pushed.
Old 13th August 2019
  #23
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Jeff Hayat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HeadlessDinosaur View Post
Its not about volume and loudness. Its about pushing the amp.
Correct. And how do you push the amp? By turning it up.

I am NOT missing the point.

Cheers.
Old 13th August 2019
  #24
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Hayat View Post
Correct. And how do you push the amp? By turning it up.

I am NOT missing the point.

Cheers.
Yes but you specifically said loud. A 5 watt tube amp even one thats a class a amp isnt really all that loud. All your examples are of high wattage amps that to hit the sweet spot you have to get super loud.

Its not about LOUD. Its the sound of the pushed circuits.
Old 13th August 2019
  #25
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Jeff Hayat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HeadlessDinosaur View Post
Yes but you specifically said loud.
Since when is everything on the internet supposed to be taken exactly as written?

Yes, I said, the amp needs to be turned up loud. Sure, it would have been better if I had said, the amp needs to be turned up loud, to push the amp and the circuits... but I didn't. What can I say, I am not perfect.
Old 13th August 2019
  #26
I've improved a lot using better instruments, better speakers and better mics.

I'm a Fane speakers fan, the F90 sounds amazing for what I do. Regarding mics I found the Lewitt MTP 440 and I love it, also dig the Beyer M201, super cool mic.
Old 13th August 2019
  #27
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Hayat View Post
Since when is everything on the internet supposed to be taken exactly as written?

Yes, I said, the amp needs to be turned up loud. Sure, it would have been better if I had said, the amp needs to be turned up loud, to push the amp and the circuits... but I didn't. What can I say, I am not perfect.

No one is, but in a forum like this something like that could make a big difference depending on the level of the engineer reading it.
Old 13th August 2019
  #28
Gear Maniac
 
Progger's Avatar
Not sure if this will be your cup of tea, but here's a track from an industrial metal soundtrack project I did earlier this year. (Holy crap did I ever have a good time making tracks like this... the prompt was "Nine Inch Nails meets Led Zeppelin." )



I'm reasonably happy with how the rhythm guitars came out, and I was working with less-than-ideal circumstances at the time. I was trying a simplified version of how Billy Corgan reportedly recorded the guitars on "Siamese Dream," which is to just stack an obscene number of different performances of the same part, all mixed relatively low and blended together like a choir. (I didn't do nearly as many tracks as Billy probably did.) I panned them around to varying degrees, playing with ratios until I liked what came out.

I tend to feel like music actually feels heavier when it's less quantized. If you think about the effect of a choir, it's the differences and imperfections from voice to voice, compounded twenty or thirty times, that makes the sound huge and pleasing.

Of course, you might think my track sounds like garbage, and that's fine! It's all subjective, after all, and we like what we like and hate what we hate. So you can take or leave my perspective as you desire!
Old 13th August 2019
  #29
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Progger View Post
Not sure if this will be your cup of tea, but here's a track from an industrial metal soundtrack project I did earlier this year. (Holy crap did I ever have a good time making tracks like this... the prompt was "Nine Inch Nails meets Led Zeppelin." )



I'm reasonably happy with how the rhythm guitars came out, and I was working with less-than-ideal circumstances at the time. I was trying a simplified version of how Billy Corgan reportedly recorded the guitars on "Siamese Dream," which is to just stack an obscene number of different performances of the same part, all mixed relatively low and blended together like a choir. (I didn't do nearly as many tracks as Billy probably did.) I panned them around to varying degrees, playing with ratios until I liked what came out.

I tend to feel like music actually feels heavier when it's less quantized. If you think about the effect of a choir, it's the differences and imperfections from voice to voice, compounded twenty or thirty times, that makes the sound huge and pleasing.

Of course, you might think my track sounds like garbage, and that's fine! It's all subjective, after all, and we like what we like and hate what we hate. So you can take or leave my perspective as you desire!
Dont know anything about this kind of music but it sounds really good to me, progger. sounds like the guitars are tuned down, are they? drums sound great too.
Old 13th August 2019
  #30
Gear Maniac
 
Progger's Avatar
Thanks @ pquinn ! I think I probably had the guitars in drop-D for this one, but that's all. Yes, I had a lot of fun with drums, percussion, and angry industrial loops for this project!

Quote:
Originally Posted by pquinn View Post
Dont know anything about this kind of music but it sounds really good to me, progger. sounds like the guitars are tuned down, are they? drums sound great too.
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