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More pro sounding guitars?
Old 15th August 2019
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tedtan View Post
Bigger, wider, more full guitars come from the differences between the two sides. Try using different chord voicings, different guitars, different different amps, speakers/cabs, different mics,different mic positions, etc. oin order to get a second track that compliments the first track rather than duplicates it exactly.
You got the answer in the first response. Complimentary variations of arrangement and gear, with solid performance.

A thousand working examples could be listed, and your solution could be 1001.
Old 16th August 2019
  #32
Quote:
Originally Posted by sfilipee View Post
A lot of heavier music now is also being recorded DI so it can be reamp'd and tried on multiple combinations of amps and pedals later, saving studio time.
Yeah. IMO that's one of the things that's wrong with a lot of it. The sound of the rig and how it responds affects your choices in what you play and how you play it. Reamping destroys that.

Of course avoiding reamping means you have to arrive at a sound and commit to it, and in the DAW age may people are terrified of actually committing to anything.

"Playing with technology" vs "playing music".
Old 16th August 2019
  #33
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ Mastering View Post
Thew guitar sound and stereo placements of the guitars are dependent on each mix the guitars are placed in.
The same exact guitar sound can sound good in one song and bad in another song. So 'pro sounding' guitars can be any guitar sound, as long as it fits that mix.
This is key. I've heard a lot of guitar parts that sounded amazingly great in context but sounded like trash in solo.

Generally speaking, it's best to make your tonal choices in context whenever possible.

Avoid the solo button except when you're chasing an actual problem.
Old 18th August 2019
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Yeah. IMO that's one of the things that's wrong with a lot of it. The sound of the rig and how it responds affects your choices in what you play and how you play it. Reamping destroys that.

Of course avoiding reamping means you have to arrive at a sound and commit to it, and in the DAW age may people are terrified of actually committing to anything.

"Playing with technology" vs "playing music".
This is very true. But more and more you see very capable guitar players who, with today's technology grew up with a DAW and Amplitube, I've had people come in to do sessions and they say they never even had an amp. So then they go into a studio and see all these amps and they want to try them all, which is even worse.

But there's also another, more positive, point of view, which is that now you can do high quality recordings in your room, while traveling, even in your car, and those might be great performances, you were in your zone at that moment, and now you can't or don't want to force that performance again so you just go to a studio or back to your gear and re-amp it.

I've seen both cases happen, but the first one shows me that you really don't know what you're doing and you're just playing bingo with sounds.
Old 18th August 2019
  #35
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Pindrive's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by tedtan View Post
Bigger, wider, more full guitars come from the differences between the two sides. Try using different chord voicings, different guitars, different different amps, speakers/cabs, different mics,different mic positions, etc. oin order to get a second track that compliments the first track rather than duplicates it exactly.
For sure. I've even run different pickups (Neck vs. Bridge) with different tone settings. Anything give the guitars a different voice in the mix. It can be like the ultimate layering. Really fill out the guitar space in the mix
Old 18th August 2019
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pindrive View Post
For sure. I've even run different pickups (Neck vs. Bridge) with different tone settings. Anything give the guitars a different voice in the mix. It can be like the ultimate layering. Really fill out the guitar space in the mix
At the end of the day you're mixing sounds. I remember reading on Guitar World Prince saying he used to layer his guitar with a keyboard, note for note, because it would sound richer.

Other bands do with the piano, I remember this really heavy Muse song where he plays the lowest octave on the piano with the fuzzed out guitar and distorted bass. You could barely hear it, but it added to the sound for sure
Old 18th August 2019
  #37
Quote:
Originally Posted by sfilipee View Post
This is very true. But more and more you see very capable guitar players who, with today's technology grew up with a DAW and Amplitube, I've had people come in to do sessions and they say they never even had an amp.
And I've known lots of people who grew up on McDonald's and Hot Pockets. That doesn't mean it's a good thing.

Quote:
So then they go into a studio and see all these amps and they want to try them all, which is even worse.
That's because they've never bother to get up off their ass and try some real amps. And most of the people I'm interested in recording nearly always bring their own, and I tend to go with what they have unless there's something really wrong with it. And if they want to use something here they generally know what they're looking for.

Quote:
But there's also another, more positive, point of view, which is that now you can do high quality recordings in your room, while traveling, even in your car, and those might be great performances, you were in your zone at that moment, and now you can't or don't want to force that performance again so you just go to a studio or back to your gear and re-amp it.

I've seen both cases happen, but the first one shows me that you really don't know what you're doing and you're just playing bingo with sounds.
I don't view doing your parts in isolation and deferring artistic choices as being any sort of positive development.

I also don't view technology that encourages people to play in isolation rather than with other musicians as in any way a good thing. As for me, personally, I find that I'm a lot more likely to "get in the zone" playing with others. I find the sterility of playing alone depressing. It's like "practicing", not playing.

As to the actual quality of the recordings, that's arguable. Even if you happen to have top notch gear in your home studio (as I do), performance always trumps technology.

I hardly ever play by myself anymore, even when learning material to take to the band. But I don't have to, my lead guitarist/music partner lives in the same house, as does his son who is also a player.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #38
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telecode's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
And I've known lots of people who grew up on McDonald's and Hot Pockets. That doesn't mean it's a good thing.



That's because they've never bother to get up off their ass and try some real amps. And most of the people I'm interested in recording nearly always bring their own, and I tend to go with what they have unless there's something really wrong with it. And if they want to use something here they generally know what they're looking for.



I don't view doing your parts in isolation and deferring artistic choices as being any sort of positive development.

I also don't view technology that encourages people to play in isolation rather than with other musicians as in any way a good thing. As for me, personally, I find that I'm a lot more likely to "get in the zone" playing with others. I find the sterility of playing alone depressing. It's like "practicing", not playing.

As to the actual quality of the recordings, that's arguable. Even if you happen to have top notch gear in your home studio (as I do), performance always trumps technology.

I hardly ever play by myself anymore, even when learning material to take to the band. But I don't have to, my lead guitarist/music partner lives in the same house, as does his son who is also a player.
+1 to this.

There is a huge, HUGE difference between playing in issolation alone in a room and playing in a room with other people.

What I started, I basically played along to the records I owned in my room for the first 5 or so years . Once I started playing with others it was a whole different ball game and I had to learn how to play with other musicians. It's all about reading the vibe of the room and especially where other musicians are coming from. Usually they are not coming from the exact same place as you are and are not influenced by the same artists and records as you are so you usually have to meet them half way to where they are going and the same applies for them. (Unless you happen to be stuck on a room with a total ego maniac dictator in which case you are screwed. ?)
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