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thicker high freqencies
Old 3 weeks ago
  #61
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post
Even if I wasn't "in the business" of being a tech, as a musician I have spent quite a lot of time maintaining gear and much of that with a soldering iron in hand if for no other reason than keeping cables and adapters working properly.

With your new pups which have color-coded wiring it's next to impossible to screw up, especially since you can literally just mimic each existing pup's connection one at a time. Granted it's helpful to have some sort of Ohmmeter or at least a Continuity Checker (1,5v battery, 2 wires and a lamp?) but if you know which end of a soldering iron to hold and that you heat the joint not the solder (the heated joint melts the solder, not the iron), you can probably do a respectable job.

It's generally safer to let a tech do most work for you but basic soldering is a skill any electronic musician should learn. Saves time and money, too. Plus if you're of a spiritual bent, it becomes a "soul" investment
I actually did try to unsolder the new ones...I have a "gun", not an "iron". I'm not sure how different they are. But I couldn't unmelt the solder where the wires joined...And what I did manage to do I made it look a lot less clean afterward. Also the original pickup on the bridge is a humbucker with different wiring from the ssl's...so I am unsure of how I would attach the new bridge Single...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #62
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Mikhael's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
I actually did try to unsolder the new ones...I have a "gun", not an "iron". I'm not sure how different they are. But I couldn't unmelt the solder where the wires joined...And what I did manage to do I made it look a lot less clean afterward. Also the original pickup on the bridge is a humbucker with different wiring from the ssl's...so I am unsure of how I would attach the new bridge Single...
"Guns" usually have a LOT more power than the irons, and a big tip to boot. They are more likely to melt whatever it is you're working on, and are too big to do any delicate work. I don't even have one anymore - that's how useless they are to me. You can put a bigger tip on an iron, but you generally can't put a smaller one on a gun...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ty45 View Post
I actually did try to unsolder the new ones...I have a "gun", not an "iron". I'm not sure how different they are. But I couldn't unmelt the solder where the wires joined...And what I did manage to do I made it look a lot less clean afterward. Also the original pickup on the bridge is a humbucker with different wiring from the ssl's...so I am unsure of how I would attach the new bridge Single...
NEVER, EVER use a gun for circuit wiring - you will destroy components and probably burn the insulation off wires, creating the possibility of shorts.

Use a 40 watt hand iron. Guns should only be used for soldering ground wires to chassis and the cases of pots, where the excessive heat capability is needed.

Based on your post you probably shouldn't attempt tech work at all if you value your equipment.

Leave the teching to real techs.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #64
Quote:
Originally Posted by RyanM View Post
Mids and compression.
Probably not.

Electronic fiddling is rarely a solution for acoustical source problems. It tends to create more problems than it solves.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoobiedood View Post
Another idea is the Pickup Booster pedal, which has a switch to lower the resonant frequency of single coils, so they sound thicker and bigger.
Lower the resonant frequency of single coils? How does that work? A pickup coil has a fixed resonant frequency. AFAIK the only way to change the resonance of a coil is with an adjustable ferrite slug. (As in an old fashioned radio.) The only way to change that is to rewind the pickup.

Maybe you can run it through a circuit that adds another resonance, but the pickup is the pickup.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikhael View Post
"Guns" usually have a LOT more power than the irons, and a big tip to boot. They are more likely to melt whatever it is you're working on, and are too big to do any delicate work. I don't even have one anymore - that's how useless they are to me. You can put a bigger tip on an iron, but you generally can't put a smaller one on a gun...
Even if you put a big tip on an iron suitable for circuit work in most cases it won't have the necessary power to solder chassis grounds.

The gun is an essential tool, albeit a seldom used one.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #67
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Mikhael's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Even if you put a big tip on an iron suitable for circuit work in most cases it won't have the necessary power to solder chassis grounds.

The gun is an essential tool, albeit a seldom used one.
I seldom if ever see that need. Most of my work is in microelectronics. These days, if a chassis ground is needed, it's almost always a mechanical connection, not a soldered one.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #68
Gear Nut
 
telegramsam's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce View Post
O.K., I'll write myself a note.

John, do yourself a favor, don't try to explain things. Especially stuff you really don't understand. its tedious.


Best,


audioforce
If you look at John's vast history of posts on this forum, you might get an idea for how wrong you are. He might be guilty of being a bit salty now and then, but I routinely see folks on this forum trying to shout down people who are giving their best advice, based on years of experience, so perhaps that explains a bit of it.

How long are knowledgeable and experienced people going to continue to post, if know-nothings are constantly telling them that THEY (the pro) are the one that knows nothing?

We've all been guilty of just wanting to "win" an exchange, but come on.

edit: Sorry John, I know you don't need me to stand up for you, but these things occasionally drive me nuts.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #69
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post
Heya John Eppstein, a lil' toast fo ya ...."Here's tae us... them wha's like us... damned few...and thy're a' daid"

I thought your blast at audiofartz was right in the sweet spot but I seriously doubt anything is going to fix him (20 posts to get 1 that contains even a good opinion (never any correct tech info) and above all isn't just nasty flinging of obfuscating poo). I'm pretty sure he is hopeless and will never do anything but posture with a puffed chest - a true poseur. I gotta tell ya man it feels great to just forget that PAB with a single click on "Ignore". Try it, you'll like it... then you can watch this video and grin with each and every audiofartz post labeled "blocked", often several in a row.



Hope you grinned like a Cheshire Cat 8 ^ )

.
I've "ignored" him twice so far.

The problem with the "ignore" button is that I often end up hitting the "read ignored post" button anyway, especially, but not only if it gets quoted by someone else. And Fartz spews so much bad information that I kinda feel an obligation to say something in case some poor noob believes him.

Have not viewed the vid yet. Will do so.

EDIT: Well, I guess that's one way to paint a guitar.....
Old 3 weeks ago
  #70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikhael View Post
I seldom if ever see that need. Most of my work is in microelectronics. These days, if a chassis ground is needed, it's almost always a mechanical connection, not a soldered one.
That's one reason that modern amps are less reliable. A mechanical ground is simply not as robust as a soldered one. Especially in something like a guitar amp that gets subjected to a lot of vibration.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #71
Lives for gear
 
audioforce's Avatar
 

Higher Gauge strings Pros

Bigger Tone
More Sustain
More Volume


Lighter Gauge strings Cons


Not as Good of Tone
Less Sustain
Less Volume


cheers,

audioforce
Old 3 weeks ago
  #72
Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce View Post
Higher Gauge strings Pros

Bigger Tone
More Sustain
More Volume


Lighter Gauge strings Cons


Not as Good of Tone
Less Sustain
Less Volume


cheers,

audioforce
Wrong. More volume? sure. More sustain? Sustain depends on guitar design an amp volume. Bigger tone? Are you trying to tell us that Billy Gibbons and Jimi Hendrix had/have weak tone? Are you deaf?

Tone depends on a combination of the pickup and the amp. If the strings have any contribution it is minor.

Have another toke of whatever you're smoking.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #73
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lame pseudonym's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post

With your new pups which have color-coded wiring it's next to impossible to screw up, especially since you can literally just mimic each existing pup's connection one at a time.
I have seen pickup color codes differ from one another.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #74
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audioforce's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
More sustain?
Yes, John. Bigger strings sustain more. That's really basic.




Best,


audioforce
Old 3 weeks ago
  #75
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Bstapper's Avatar
 

BB King. .008
Old 3 weeks ago
  #76
Lives for gear
 
audioforce's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bstapper View Post
BB King. .008
Ha ha. Great voice. And the one-note b-string shake vibrato trick. Funny though when he said, “I’m not really a chord man”. Yeah bb, I guess not.

He also played approximately .008 notes per bar. True story. He liked to make ‘em count though, huh?


Best,

audioforce
Old 3 weeks ago
  #77
Old 3 weeks ago
  #78
Lives for gear
 
Bstapper's Avatar
 

You must be a master of tone. So let’s hear it. Any links to your mastery of the thick guitar string?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #79
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kennybro's Avatar
String gauge can have an effect, depending on how you play and your settings. Gibbons uses 7's, and has a massive tone with plenty of balls in the high end with sustain, never weedy. But from a long ago interview, he has a very light attack (you can hear his light attack), and his amp settings are tuned in for strong low-mids and plenty of gain, with the ice pick high end stuff rolled off.

I suspect that if SRV went to 7's and low action and kept his style and settings, that would have been a disaster. Slam a tiny diameter string with a lot of force, and it's going to crap out and get weedy. Tone truly is in the fingers, and in how you use and manipulate what is in your hands in the moment.

One of the more influential aspects of tone is where you pick the string. Players get into a habit of resting their palm on the tailpiece, and picking close to the bridge. Moving that pick a few inches south with have great impact on tone, especially when combined with other tone altering settings and techniques.

Tone is not gear... it's a dynamic combination of gear and the person using the gear... the person being the more important aspect of that equation.

I think most seasoned players here know this stuff instinctively, but many people do love to distill everything down to gear. It's so much easier to digest.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #80
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nyandres's Avatar
You are all fighting but you are all also right....

String gauge: String gauge definitely affects and can thicken tone, but more importantly if the player is comfortable to make the most of it. It can thin the tone otherwise.

Amp: Compression can create the illusion of a thicker tone, thought it can also make the tone smaller. Fruciante i believe uses compression as part of his tone

Cabinet: Well, i mean the resonances that some cabines can have, have a huge effect on creating a monstrous tone. My favorite for high gain for example was a Port City Wave Oversize cabinet.... That thing sounds thickkkk

Speakers: The cabinet above I had tried with both V30s and veteran 30s.. The cheaper and smoother veteran 30s had "thicker highs" (not sure what that means) but the smoothness made the overall sound thicker for sure. Same speakers on the famous marshall 1960 for example would sound tinny (by comparison of course. The marshall is a great cab, but is kinda crap next to the Port City)


TWO EXTREMELY IMPoRTANT ONES IN MY OPINION

Playing technique: The way a player reacts to the above. I know im gonna get flamed for this as I saw Hendrix brought up.. A lot of the thickness in hendrix tone is on the effects, as well as his interaction with his gear. I however do think a better player (FROM a technique perspective) would have a thicker tone with the same gear. But that is also possibly part of the effect anyways.

Arrangement: Some bands sound thicker because of the arrangement. A super obvious setup is in metal where there are songs with obviously synchronized kick, guitar and bass, which exagerrates to what comes off as a HUGE sounding guitar. The guitar itself is actually much smaller sounding
Old 3 weeks ago
  #81
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Bstapper's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennybro View Post
Tone truly is in the fingers, and in how you use and manipulate what is in your hands in the moment.

Amen...

from my first post in this thread: "String gauge on electric guitar can certainly make a difference, but not nearly as much as the fingers, the amplifier, and the pickups."
Old 3 weeks ago
  #82
Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce View Post
Yes, John. Bigger strings sustain more. That's really basic.




Best,


audioforce
No, they don't.

Take a listen to some Hendrix or Gibbons.

Compare to Dick Dale, who used HUGE strings and played with very little sustain most of the time.

Or to any of the old jazzers who played on bridge cables and had nearly ZERO sustain.

Actually, lighter strings have marginally better sustain, since it is much easier for them to be excited by the output of the speaker.

Heavy strings tend to be rather plonky.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #83
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Moonwhistle's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
No, they don't.

Take a listen to some Hendrix or Gibbons.

Compare to Dick Dale, who used HUGE strings and played with very little sustain most of the time.

Or to any of the old jazzers who played on bridge cables and had nearly ZERO sustain.

Actually, lighter strings have marginally better sustain, since it is much easier for them to be excited by the output of the speaker.

Heavy strings tend to be rather plonky.
Bit of a leap there John.

Not much increase in sustain with heavier strings but there is a little depending on the guitar. Need to lower the pickups a little though otherwise the heavier strings will actually decrease sustain.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #84
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audioforce's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonwhistle View Post
Need to lower the pickups a little though otherwise the heavier strings will actually decrease sustain.
Hmm. I can't say that I have ever changed the pickup height to accommodate heavier strings.

I think its true that having your pickups [especially single coil Strat-like pickups] jacked up super high will reduce sustain. It can also cause some other weirdness. It'll do that with any gauge strings though.

But going between 10-46 and 11-48 or 49 has never required a pickup adjustment, and the 11-48s do ring out a bit "stronger and longer".

I guess my pickups are set to where they work for either gauge.

In most cases, I think you have to have the pickups pretty darn close to the strings to have the pickups killing sustain, especially with humbuckers. But I think a lot of players probably do that, thinking that's the way to get more gain.


Best always,


audioforce
Old 2 weeks ago
  #85
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enorbet2's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by lame pseudonym View Post
I have seen pickup color codes differ from one another.
I have only seen that on after market replacement pups and those should have a diagram of some sort for the color code they used. Within any one manufacturer, especially the original guitar maker, one can expect consistency On a simple 2-wire arrangement, while there are advantages like improved shielding given one polarity arrangement, nevertheless as long as they are all the same brand/model, consistency will still conclude in a working install and flipping polarity isn't a huge deal if you want to see if you like that arrangement better.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #86
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bstapper View Post
will be genuinely interested in your opinion - please come back and share.

Thanks!
Brock
Not as impressed with the tone as I hoped. They are quite similar in that regard. One thing I like much more about the ssl's is the envelope of them compared with the stock. The attack is more immediate and the sustain is longer making the signal sound much more even.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #87
Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce View Post
Yes, John. Bigger strings sustain more. That's really basic.




Best,


audioforce
No, and no.

Most heavy sets on electric guitar don't increase sustain at all. I many c ases they actually sustain less because it's harder for the energy of the speakers to get a heavier string moving. That should be obvious, but i guess some people don't get that. Preconception can be a powerful thing.

Compare the sustain of Jimi Hendrix to the lack of sustain of a Joe Pass or Barney Kessel.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #88
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Moonwhistle's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Compare the sustain of Jimi Hendrix to the lack of sustain of a Joe Pass or Barney Kessel.
Loud marshall vs clean jazz amp.

Not a comparison.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #89
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audioforce's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
No, and no.

Most heavy sets on electric guitar don't increase sustain at all. I many c ases they actually sustain less because it's harder for the energy of the speakers to get a heavier string moving. That should be obvious, but i guess some people don't get that. Preconception can be a powerful thing.

Compare the sustain of Jimi Hendrix to the lack of sustain of a Joe Pass or Barney Kessel.
You're talking about something completely different just to try to be right, sir.

And you're even wrong about what you are talking about [which is already tangential].

Everybody, and I do mean everybody with any sense, knows you are wrong.

But keep tap-dancing, man, its funny.


Best,

audioforce
Old 2 weeks ago
  #90
Lives for gear
 
audioforce's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Compare the sustain of Jimi Hendrix to the lack of sustain of a Joe Pass or Barney Kessel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonwhistle View Post
Loud marshall vs clean jazz amp.

Not a comparison.

Ha, ha. Not to mention: Flatwounds vs Roundwounds.

Mr. Eppstein is just spinning in desperation. No idea, clueless. What a hoot.
.

He went from "string gauge will have an effect, but not as much....", on page 1, to now, "thicker strings have less sustain".

And again, how did amps and Hendrix's effects chain get in here? We are supposed to be talking about strings. Early on in this thread, and the other one, I and others already mentioned that there are people that use thinner strings who get a "good tone". WTF does that mean? Does it mean they wouldn't get a better tone with thicker strings? No, it does not mean that. Nothing is what that means. I mean, how many ways are there to affect tone? Do they all mutually disqualify each other? Obviously not.


Best always,


audioforce
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