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Help with Putting Together First Pedalboard
Old 9th June 2019
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Help with Putting Together First Pedalboard

I've just started to get into individual effect pedals and need some help with putting together my first board. I have a Nomad rechargeable pedalboard coming in the mail next week. I need to help with figuring out the order of where I should place my pedals. I know there are some information on the internet but I want to share the specific equipment I own and see if you guys can have some fun in putting them in order for me.

Amp: Vox AC10C1 (no effects loop....sad)
Guitar: MIM Strat Standard and a Squier Tele
Music: variety.....Beatles, Radiohead, Nirvana, Coldplay, CCR

See the pedals I have in the below image and help me put them in order? I have have a Boss TU-2 tuner and a DD-7 Digital Delay coming in the mail as well so please consider those as well.
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Old 10th June 2019
  #2
Gear Head
 

I’m no expert, and the true answer is you’ll have to experiment and use your ears, but I think the rule of thumb order would be something like tuner>filters/wah>distortion/fuzz>time based effects.
Old 10th June 2019
  #3
Lives for gear
 
davet's Avatar
 

Mine is;
Tuner, compression, distortion, chorus, phase shift, volume pedal, reverb, delay.

Seems the most important is reverbs/delays after the volume pedal so as not to
cut off the reverb tails.
YMMV........
Old 11th June 2019
  #4
Here for the gear
 

Individual effects can be a bit of a mind field as there are so many to choose from.
i'd recommend that you head here for full pedal reviews - https://guitareffectspedalz.com/

Personally I use an overdrive, delay, reverb, wah, synth and tuner
Old 4 weeks ago
  #5
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bowzin's Avatar
Dont worry abt amp effects loops, theyre a bit over-rated. Here's a solid order to get you started, but experiment because there are many valid options:

Tuner - wish the boss tuner was true bypass, its a lil tone-sucky but being in tune is an important trade-off. Im not familiar with your noise gate, but maybe you could put it in the effects loop of the noise gate.

Compressor

Boosts
Overdrives
Distortion/fuzz <- the order on these "matters" but theres no right or wrong. Also some ppl like to put the comp after overdrives, which keeps the interaction between guitar pickups and OD, then compresses it, vs. compress the raw signal first to balance it out then hit the OD's.

I guess if you want to use the noise gate, this would be a good place, personally I dont think youll need it. This will gate the noisy distortions before it, but if you put it after the delays/reverbs it will interfere with the delay/reverb tails and cut off unnaturally.

Phaser - although I actually put my phaser before my overdrives, so again multiple options

Delay

Reverb
Old 4 weeks ago
  #6
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audioforce's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
I've just started to get into individual effect pedals and need some help with putting together my first board. I have a Nomad rechargeable pedalboard coming in the mail next week. I need to help with figuring out the order of where I should place my pedals. I know there are some information on the internet but I want to share the specific equipment I own and see if you guys can have some fun in putting them in order for me.

Amp: Vox AC10C1 (no effects loop....sad)
Guitar: MIM Strat Standard and a Squier Tele
Music: variety.....Beatles, Radiohead, Nirvana, Coldplay, CCR

See the pedals I have in the below image and help me put them in order? I have have a Boss TU-2 tuner and a DD-7 Digital Delay coming in the mail as well so please consider those as well.
This is assuming you don't have a switcher or any loops to utilize. So just guitar>pedals>amp.

You kind of want to put that compressor first [usually], although you might put it behind one of the distortion type devices [or all of them]. But if you try to engage 2 or more distortion units at the same time [or anything else noisy] with the compressor behind them, it will probably get way too noisy because the compressor is just going to bring up all the noise it sees. A gate will help some, but its a messy way to go.

So, if you want to use your compressor and a distortion unit together, it will sound different depending on which one is first in the chain. A distortion unit while react differently to a straight guitar signal than it will to a compressed signal. A compressor does what it does to whatever you feed it.

What I’m getting at is that you may like the way your distortion devices react to a non-compressed signal, and then you compress it after the fact, if you like. But there is the potential noise issue inherent in following anything with a compressor.

You can try your distortion units in any order. Generally, probably try “tamest” first and then progressively more raucous sounding ones following. See what it sounds like when you engage two or more distortion / fuzz devices depending on what order you have them in. You will probably very rarely have more than a couple engaged simultaneously, but its possible

The chorus probably goes after the distortion devices, and the reverb behind the chorus. Time based effects usually work best at the end of the chain, with the shorter delays [in your case the Small Clone] first and the longest delays [reverb] following. The digital delay pedal you have coming would go between the Small clone and the reverb.

Your amp also has reverb, I think, so you may find that sounds better generally than the pedal.

You could add another gate to go in front of the compressor, but it gets tricky.

Maybe get an A/B switch and run your tuner alone, off one channel. No need to have that in the audio chain.

I’m writing this kind of quick, and I hope its clear. Anyhow, that should be a start. Have fun and play around with it.

If you have questions, ask away.


Oh, and getting the input and output levels on the various devices tweaked right is as important as getting the order right. Also, resist the urge to use everything all at once all the time. : ). Good sounding guitar tone and playing doesn't need, or benefit from, a ton of effects all the time. Effects can be really great and really make a difference when used musically though. But try to rely on your playing and basic guitar sound in the first instance.

Keep it classy! [but sometimes trashy is good] : )


EDIT: You may probably want your noise gate BEFORE the delays and reverbs, but after the other stuff, if you are not using the amps own reverb. I don't usually use or want noise gating.

Best,

audioforce
Old 4 weeks ago
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowzin View Post
Dont worry abt amp effects loops, theyre a bit over-rated. Here's a solid order to get you started, but experiment because there are many valid options:

Tuner - wish the boss tuner was true bypass, its a lil tone-sucky but being in tune is an important trade-off. Im not familiar with your noise gate, but maybe you could put it in the effects loop of the noise gate.

Compressor

Boosts
Overdrives
Distortion/fuzz <- the order on these "matters" but theres no right or wrong. Also some ppl like to put the comp after overdrives, which keeps the interaction between guitar pickups and OD, then compresses it, vs. compress the raw signal first to balance it out then hit the OD's.

I guess if you want to use the noise gate, this would be a good place, personally I dont think youll need it. This will gate the noisy distortions before it, but if you put it after the delays/reverbs it will interfere with the delay/reverb tails and cut off unnaturally.

Phaser - although I actually put my phaser before my overdrives, so again multiple options

Delay

Reverb
This order is the best default order.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #8
Gear Addict
All the advice above is good, all I'd add is that I have a couple of boards, grown from just the one as I added a couple more pedals, and I'm beginning to come around to the Paul Gilbert philosophy which is "assemble what you want to live with for a while, knowing that you'll always be changing things around".

For me at least, using boards seems to fix the order of pedals in my mind and I get less willing to swap things around to try different overall sounds, especially since I've carefully calculated power requirements and set up my power brick (1-Spot CS-7) accordingly.

To complicate things, I have a few pedals that always go at the front and some that always go after, no matter what setup I'm using. At the front - tuner, volume, wah, line selector (Boss LS-2). There'd also be a compressor there but for the fact I use one on each board (Boss CS-2 on one and TC Hypergravity on the more fixed setup). At the back there's another volume (stereo this time to cater for stereo pedals), and a stereo reverb/looper after the volume. These pre and post effects can bookend either of the main boards I use, and I'm likely to make my own small boards for those because their arrangement is always the same. It's a bit overthought, I know, but seeing how Paul Gilbert has this open ended "pick & mix" arrangement that makes a lot of sense to me, I've wanted to keep some element of swappability about things, and if you get more pedals over time, you might also start wondering where things "ought to go" rather than just experimenting.

We can either think things through to the n'th degree and stick with it, or just be prepared to swap around and be a bit more sceptical about having things set in stone. Maybe it depends on whether you're looking for a sound to stick with or whether you're an experimenter who wants a fuzz after a flanger sometimes.

There's a YT clip of Paul Gilbert rummaging around at home in his boxes of pedals and it gets pretty obvious that he would as soon assemble a board as changing amp settings to hone some particular sound. In fact in this clip alone there are (ISTR) about 3 boards - all home-made. Mind you, he probably has a magnet in him that attracts pedals, to judge by the quantities - 4 Phase 90s...


Here's one of him at Sweetwater being his inimitable self.


It's all musical Lego.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 
audioforce's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bowzin View Post
Dont worry abt amp effects loops, theyre a bit over-rated. Here's a solid order to get you started, but experiment because there are many valid options:

Tuner - wish the boss tuner was true bypass, its a lil tone-sucky but being in tune is an important trade-off. Im not familiar with your noise gate, but maybe you could put it in the effects loop of the noise gate.

Compressor

Boosts
Overdrives
Distortion/fuzz <- the order on these "matters" but theres no right or wrong. Also some ppl like to put the comp after overdrives, which keeps the interaction between guitar pickups and OD, then compresses it, vs. compress the raw signal first to balance it out then hit the OD's.

I guess if you want to use the noise gate, this would be a good place, personally I dont think youll need it. This will gate the noisy distortions before it, but if you put it after the delays/reverbs it will interfere with the delay/reverb tails and cut off unnaturally.

Phaser - although I actually put my phaser before my overdrives, so again multiple options

Delay

Reverb

I edited my previous post to talk about placement of the noise gate before delays and reverbs, as you had already mentioned. I liked your post.

Like you, it seems, I don't so much go for noise gates so much in guitar rigs. Suppressors, a la "Hush" and the like, seem better if you absolutely need that kind of thing. Or a volume pedal. : )

But, not to disagree, but just to look at it from a different angle too, I think its worth mentioning that having delays and reverbs post-gate carries its own potential weirdness, and sometimes it may actually be better to just throw the thing in at the very end of the chain and be done with it. If you have it set right, and you're not playing some sort of ambient stuff with long delay loops fading into forever, you'll be cool. And if you have a gate before delay and reverb you could possibly get some weirdness, like the last thing the delay line hears and repeats over and over is the sound of the gate clamping down, or reverb signal with no direct signal existing alongside. You may be better off with no sound at all when the gate closes.

When we use gates in the studio, its usually to stop all sound, not to stop everything but the reverb. But that's not a hard and fast rule either, so..... whatever works and sounds good, I guess.

I think one has to kind of try different approaches and see what's making it and what's not making it. And I say probably just avoid gates in these kinds of setups if you can. Suppressors / intelligent noise reduction devices are probably more helpful, if you have a situation that requires something like that.


cheers,


audioforce
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