The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Guitars for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Are you Picky about Pickups? Dynamic Microphones
Old 3 weeks ago
  #151
Gear Addict
Go for 'seductive red'
Old 3 weeks ago
  #152
Quote:
Originally Posted by guavadude View Post
Typically you need to use a dremel tool or something abrasive to “clean” a spot on the back of the pots where you’re grounding. This will let the solder flow and attach to the pot better.

Us electronic professionals just use flux and a big enough iron. Unless the steel potentiometer can is rusty, there's no need for abrasive cleaning.

Of course, I use solder with lead in it... If you insist on lead-free solder, you may need to take more extreme measures.




-tINY

Old 3 weeks ago
  #153
Lives for gear
 
guavadude's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by tINY View Post

Us electronic professionals just use flux and a big enough iron. Unless the steel potentiometer can is rusty, there's no need for abrasive cleaning.

Of course, I use solder with lead in it... If you insist on lead-free solder, you may need to take more extreme measures.




-tINY

idk, that's how I learned from a pro luthier. You just hit the pot with the dremel to take the coating off and it's a ton easier to get a bond.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #154
Quote:
Originally Posted by guavadude View Post
idk, that's how I learned from a pro luthier. You just hit the pot with the dremel to take the coating off and it's a ton easier to get a bond.

Interesting... I guess I've always had un-coated pots.



-tINY

Old 3 weeks ago
  #155
Lives for gear
 
guavadude's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by tINY View Post

Interesting... I guess I've always had un-coated pots.

Coating is probably the wrong term..I'm just knocking the shiny off of the pots.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #156
Guys, guys....

You're both right. A Dremel can help, especially if the pot is old and the case is dirty.

However in most cases A Dremel shouldn't be needed, as long as your iron has sufficient wattage, you use flux, and you use lower melting point solder - 60/40 is OK but 63/37 is MUCH better.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #157
Use the copper foil screen as the ground connection. Use a grabby tooth washer for the pots.
Old 1 week ago
  #158
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Well,. back in the '70s there were custom pickups around but the were mostly done one-off by custom rewinders like Dan Torres. by the '80s some of those guys had started the first boutique pickup companies and the concept caught on like wildfire.

The Gibson mini-humbuckers you refer to were really only produced for the last two years of the '60s - they're mostly a '70s phenomenon. I have never really been a fan of the Gibson made ones - they were Norlin products built when quality control was low The design originally was from the USA Epiphone guitars and the ones on the '60s Epis were pretty darn good - they were originally developed for Epi's top of the line jazz boxes and then used for some of the Epi solid bodies made in the '60s. The reason they ended up in Lers Pauls was the Gibson apparently had a bunch of LP Standard bodies from the '50s that were routed for P-90s. When Gibson/Norlin retired EPI USA they had a few of the Epi mini-HBs lying around and some bright marketing guy had the idea of cutting a big hole in a P-90 cover that would fit the Mini and using that in the old bodies because P-90s were not popular at the time. They called the new model the Les Paul Deluxe and started making new minis for them that often were not quite up to par.

I disagree somewhat strongly that Gibson guitars made prior to about 1966 and Pre-CBS era Fenders were not of superior quality to later versions. Before that line both companies were using a lot more hand done work on their instruments that in the mid-'60s and later*. Also, prior to that point in time materials for guitars (quality of wood) was MUCH better 0 there was still a lot of close grained old growth wood available. This went away because of the double whammy of an increase in demand that outstripped availability of quality materials and the Vietnam War, which saw the best quality of certain woods requisitioned for use in small aircraft and helicopters and small PT style river boats. (As seen in "Apocalypse Now".)

So, for the most part the true vintage Gibson and Fenders really are better instrument but, with a few exceptions guitars from those companies built post-66 are just old guitars.

In nearly all cases when I look for a new pickup or two for a guitar I skip over the larger companies who mass produce pickups. Some of those pickups re really good, like many of the Seymour Duncan units, but I'm probably going to want a hand wound pickup built individually to my specs for my particular application - which I why I'm such a big fan of Lindy Fralin because you can still have direct input on the choices made on the pickup(s) you order - and if they don't make you happy you can exchange it for one that will. You say you want something "predictable". That's fine. But I want something built to my preferences.



* - since wood is an organic material and no two pieces are identical the more automation involved ion production the more consistent the dimensions will be but the lower the quality because real human craftsmen, even working on an assembly line, are able to evaluate each piece of wood and get the best out of it.

Attention to detail is the thing. Machines pay attention to nothing except their programming.

That being said, I do own a number of relatively cheap, mass produced guitars and I must say that the bottom of the market now is much, much better than the bottom of the market then. But the top of the market? The typical Gibson or Fender Custom Shop guitar now is of about the same quality of build as the average off the shelf instrument built in 1959 or the first years of the '60s.
When I said that many of the later gibson's were as good or better than the 50s and 60s ones,.. I should have explained myself better. I am ONLY comparing them up to around the late 70s or early 80s. I've had quite a few 70s ones, (still do),..and there were a LOT LESS problems to deal with in the 70s. I have had enough of them to know I am telling the truth. As far as thinking newer les pauls...for example, don't use quality wood,..Do you even know what you are talking about? I've been in a business (not guitars) that uses high end woods for a long time. Many companies will let wood sit in a warehouse for 30 years before they will even use it. If you think they are using poor woods on "decent" guitars, you're nuts. Yes, you do get what you pay for so you need to pay enough to get quality.
A few years back, in France,.. A double blind study was done with the best violinists in the world,. Blindfolded, they were each asked to play a 300 year old Stradivarius, and also a current high quality Stradivarius design violin, (same design). GUESS WHAT????? The new violins won the contest hands down. The artists were just asked to play it long enough to determine which was the "genuine" 300 year old,..and which one was made last year.
Old 1 week ago
  #159
Quote:
Originally Posted by puke View Post
A few years back, in France,.. A double blind study was done with the best violinists in the world,. Blindfolded, they were each asked to play a 300 year old Stradivarius, and also a current high quality Stradivarius design violin, (same design). GUESS WHAT????? The new violins won the contest hands down. The artists were just asked to play it long enough to determine which was the "genuine" 300 year old,..and which one was made last year.
Not only is that old news, it's thoroughly debunked old news.

Hey, guess what? Somebody whose busines is selling new violins sponsors a "study" that "proves" that new violins are equal or superior to Stradivarii!

HMmmm... What's wrong with this picture?

I'm not going to bother with a point-by-point dissection of the "double-blind test" (I already did that at least once or twice in this forum already), let's just say that there are many, many different ways to throw of bias a test of this sort - conducting it in an acoustically hostile environment is only the first.

Quote:
As far as thinking newer les pauls...for example, don't use quality wood,..Do you even know what you are talking about?
Do you? Do you consider pressure formed high density cardboard to be a suitable material for fingerboards on premium models?

Quote:
I've been in a business (not guitars) that uses high end woods for a long time.
Not guitars.

Uh, YEAH!

Quote:
Many companies will let wood sit in a warehouse for 30 years before they will even use it. If you think they are using poor woods on "decent" guitars, you're nuts.
Nuts or not, if you really believe that Gibson under Henry was storing wood for 30 years before using it I have a bridge to sell you. At the volume of guitars Gibson cranks out they'd use up such a premium stash in no time at all. Maybe you haven't heard - the big new thing is "torrified" wood. Wood that has been artificially aged in a kiln. There have been "studies" that "prove" it's superior to real aged wood, too!

I have no idea what the current management is doing but I would be extremely surprised if they have tyhe capital to invest in premium woods when they're trying to turn around a bankrupt company.

The truth is that the demand for real premium woods is much greater than the available supply. So substitutions are made, "Alternatives" are chosen. But there is one truth that can't be avoided - the available supply of premium quality old growth tonewood is extremely limited. Like, not enough to go around.

Guitars are not furniture.

Last edited by John Eppstein; 1 week ago at 10:37 AM..
Old 1 week ago
  #160
Lives for gear
 
ponzi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
...Do you consider pressure formed high density cardboard to be a suitable material for fingerboards on premium models?...

if you really believe that Gibson under Henry was storing wood for 30 years before using it I have a bridge to sell you....
If you want to provide more information about the artificial fretboard materials, I am all ears.

I was in a guitar store a coupole of years ago when I first learned that some companies were putting out essentially plastic fretboards, and I was assured most sincerely that they had equivalent sound to their wood counterparts, and perhaps even superior in some respects--well, I know nobody in a guitar store would say something just to sell a guitar... But I guess for the impecunious musician, no harm in meeting a price point--I found this development oddly disturbing.

Also, My thought is that if Henry inherited some 30 year old wood when he bought gibson, his first order of business would have been to sell it to paul reed smith...

I also note that I read PRS talking about guitar woods and he mentioned that one question is the degree to which the sap in the wood had crystalized. I imagine this is something that old wood has that new wood does not.
Old 1 week ago
  #161
Lives for gear
 
Mikhael's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ponzi View Post
I also note that I read PRS talking about guitar woods and he mentioned that one question is the degree to which the sap in the wood had crystalized. I imagine this is something that old wood has that new wood does not.
This is something torrification is supposed to do. Whether it does or not I can't personally say; I have no experience with baked maple or any other wood. But this is one of the claims.

Why don't we ever see torrified (baked) mahogany? Seeing as it's used often for a neck wood, it seems this process would be a shoe-in to make it stiffer.
Old 1 week ago
  #162
Gear Guru
I keep hearing about that violin contest. Anyone that plays, knows different instruments even from the same builder, vary greatly. An instrument 300 years old, c'mon!....
There also is what a virtuoso would like to play, response and how it feels. Those are intangibles that play heavily in the equation if you are performing. Louder is always better so who knows what happens there in a "contest". A brighter instrument will probably win in any superficial comparison.

Honestly shootouts are really stupid unless they point you in a direction that's helpful. They don't "prove" anything beyond a snapshot of a place and time.. I've heard people talking about how it's been proved scientifically. Opinions ain't science.......

FWIW, I have a Collings guitar I love playing and writing on. I'm sure it'd get slaughtered in a "shootout" with a Taylor, in some circles (I like Taylors BTW). I've also played Collings guitars I flat out didn't like. I didn't click with my Collings initially (it was given to me), and only by playing it learned how to work it. I like bright sustainy guitars and it is dark and chunky. But the depth.....! Anyway, you can fit pretty much any narrative to a "study" on the internet, and jucy headlines abound.......
Old 1 week ago
  #163
Lives for gear
 
ponzi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikhael View Post
This is something torrification is supposed to do. Whether it does or not I can't personally say; I have no experience with baked maple or any other wood. But this is one of the claims.

Why don't we ever see torrified (baked) mahogany? Seeing as it's used often for a neck wood, it seems this process would be a shoe-in to make it stiffer.
From what little I know, and glad to be educated on this, I believe some degree of baking neck and fretboard wood has always been done by companies willing to invest in their products to this degree--preceeded by a year or so of air drying. How torrification works, I have no idea, but I imagine that baking too fast must have its problems as well. Is torrification another word gibson made up like plecking? A marketing word?
Old 1 week ago
  #164
Lives for gear
 
Mikhael's Avatar
 

Torrification is baking at a higher temp than just kiln drying, and it's done in an oxygen-free atmosphere. Torrification has been around since - well, a long time. The Vikings used it on the wood for their boats, apparently. Now how they got rid of the oxygen, I have no idea. It also refers to the process for making charcoal and coke (not the drink).
Old 1 week ago
  #165
Gear Guru
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikhael View Post
Torrification is baking at a higher temp than just kiln drying, and it's done in an oxygen-free atmosphere. Torrification has been around since - well, a long time. The Vikings used it on the wood for their boats, apparently. Now how they got rid of the oxygen, I have no idea. It also refers to the process for making charcoal and coke (not the drink).
Easy, Vikings could strangle trees!........
Old 1 week ago
  #166
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponzi View Post
If you want to provide more information about the artificial fretboard materials, I am all ears.
Paper composite panels - Wikipedia

Scroll down to "Applications".
Old 1 week ago
  #167
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponzi View Post
From what little I know, and glad to be educated on this, I believe some degree of baking neck and fretboard wood has always been done by companies willing to invest in their products to this degree--preceeded by a year or so of air drying. How torrification works, I have no idea, but I imagine that baking too fast must have its problems as well.
Torrefaction is not the same as traditional kiln drying. Look it up.

Since I've already spent most of an afternoon looking it up for an earlier discussion I'll let you let your fingers do the walking this time.

But I'll start you off with this - torrefaction doesn't just dry the wood - it also partially changes the molecular structure via partial carbonization.


Here's your search:

torrefaction - Google Search



Quote:
Is torrification another word gibson made up like plecking? A marketing word?
Gibson didn't invent the plek process - the machine was invented and is produced by a company in Germany and is usaed by many guitar companies and independent luthiers.

It's essentially a CNC process for frets.

PLEK / A+D Gitarrentechnologie GmbH - PLEK: THE ART OF THE FINGERBOARD
Old 1 week ago
  #168
Lives for gear
 
ponzi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Torrefaction is not the same as traditional kiln drying. Look it up.

Since I've already spent most of an afternoon looking it up for an earlier discussion I'll let you let your fingers do the walking this time...
I think its customary for people who don't want to answer a question in a forum, to simply not answer it. If we did otherwise, a simple question could receive hundreds of answers from people who did not feel like answering it.

Also another poster answered the question before you stated you would not answer it, so it didn't really need answering either way.
Old 1 week ago
  #169
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Not only is that old news, it's thoroughly debunked old news.

Hey, guess what? Somebody whose busines is selling new violins sponsors a "study" that "proves" that new violins are equal or superior to Stradivarii!

HMmmm... What's wrong with this picture?

I'm not going to bother with a point-by-point dissection of the "double-blind test" (I already did that at least once or twice in this forum already), let's just say that there are many, many different ways to throw of bias a test of this sort - conducting it in an acoustically hostile environment is only the first.



Do you? Do you consider pressure formed high density cardboard to be a suitable material for fingerboards on premium models?



Not guitars.

Uh, YEAH!



Nuts or not, if you really believe that Gibson under Henry was storing wood for 30 years before using it I have a bridge to sell you. At the volume of guitars Gibson cranks out they'd use up such a premium stash in no time at all. Maybe you haven't heard - the big new thing is "torrified" wood. Wood that has been artificially aged in a kiln. There have been "studies" that "prove" it's superior to real aged wood, too!

I have no idea what the current management is doing but I would be extremely surprised if they have tyhe capital to invest in premium woods when they're trying to turn around a bankrupt company.

The truth is that the demand for real premium woods is much greater than the available supply. So substitutions are made, "Alternatives" are chosen. But there is one truth that can't be avoided - the available supply of premium quality old growth tonewood is extremely limited. Like, not enough to go around.

Guitars are not furniture.
Supply and Demand always meet at a certain price,. ALWAYS. it's like gravity. There is always enough to go around as long as you are willing to pay what it costs. That might (or might not) explain why a les paul custom is a ton of money right now.
Central america used to be where they try to get it. I have to say one thing you are not going to like,.. But..for the right piece of wood, a high end furniture company will pay an awful lot more than gibson will. That has always been the case. And fender has even been cheaper when procuring wood. I did Beverly Hills for a long time,..and there were furnitue companies that ANYTHING at all was 50 grand, and it went up from there. I guess nowadays it's 100k.
Also, Do you know who Dean Zalinsky is. If I recall,..He is in the "furniture business"...or was. (is he retired?). He also made dean guitars for a while. For the first 5 or 10 years his guitars were much more sought after than Gibsons,..but I think someone bought him out or something and he went back into the furniture business. I still have one of his original V guitars.I think it's Mohagany,..but it's black and I can't say without pulling the electronics out.

About the blindfold study,.....Don't resort to lying. Leave your ego at home and you might learn something you didn't know the day before. The blindfold strad. story was not debunked. It was done 5+ years ago in Europe, I think france,...and a cursory search will show you a similar test was done in New York about 2 years ago. Apparently it is becoming a "thing"....to do this test if you have the resources to round up one of the real 300 year old ones. So far the new ones win.... Unless you are entitled to make up your own set of facts. I am not saying new guitars will always win (or not),..I'm just saying you need your eyes wide open. My newest guitar is about 35 or 40 years old. My two best sounding guitars are 1965 and early 70s. I did have have to deal with the neck bump on the 65 (years and years ago).

You can call gibson and ask them about their mohagany today vs. 1960. I've talked to them a few times before but never asked them about that. I am not the one who feels like he gets beer poured in his wheaties if they still have the same quality mohagany they had in the 60s. Costs change, but if you pay, you can still get what you want. They will probably tell you that the wood they use on their premium guitars today is more stable and consistent (better...if you make instruments) that it was back then. Ya, believe it or not you can call them and they'll keep transferring you back and forth until you actually talk to someone who knows. One time I was trying to find an official Gibson "A" shop in So.Cal. Nearly everybody who carried and worked on gibsons would tell you they were "official".. But ask them to put a logo back onto a 50s les paul and you actually find out (from Gibson) that there was one single qualified guy in the western US,..His name is TV Jones ( He lived about an hour from hollywod). At the time he made handwound custom pickups for Guild, and would accept any "real" guitar work that nobody else could do. He sure had made some nice custom guitars (that I couldn't afford).
Old 1 week ago
  #170
Gear Addict
 
Sniff's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post

Since I've already spent most of an afternoon looking it up for an earlier discussion .......
I somehow think the above rules out much possibility of the below happening

Quote:
Originally Posted by puke View Post

Don't resort to lying. Leave your ego at home and you might learn something you didn't know the day before.
Old 1 week ago
  #171
Lives for gear
 
ponzi's Avatar
I am reluctant to share my story, as I just want to be seen as one of the guys, but I have to side with John Eppstein on this due to my own experience.

Many years ago, as a young man, I was a pioneer in computing and had the good luck to have invented the 'enter' key. Being a minor contribution, it netted me a mere $100 million dollars, compared to the billions of my contemporaries Bill Gates and Larry Ellison. Nonetheless I was able to conserve my windfall and make a comfortable life for myself.

Initially I engaged in the basest hedonism: drugs, alcohol, women, and for a short time even engaged in veganism. However, I soon saw the spiritual emptiness in this lifestyle and resolved myself to make a meaningful contribution to society by building the ultimate guitar. It took me the better part of 30 years to assemble and I logged over a half million miles flying around the globe in the pursuit of the ultimate tone woods, and I am proud to say, I made my modest contribution to the guitar world as well.

The body was made from joists taken from a 1,000 year old monastery, who's mortgage I foreclosed on for this very purpose. I then turned my attention to the fretboard. I settled on some wood taken from a golf cart archaeologists recovered from the tomb of Amhenotep the elder. Carbon 14 dated it as being 5,000 years old, and it did sound noticeably better than 3,000 year old wood also recovered from the Valley Of The Kings. In fact, the guitar had so much mojo that it inspired the song Walk Like an Egyptian.

I still felt there was something missing. After much experimentation I found that a set of tuning key heads, fashioned from the tusks of a woolly mammoth that had been recovered completely intact from the Siberian permafrost, was the final touch I needed. Surely it goes without saying that the guitar held its tune even after the most vigorous use of the tremolo bar.

So, I encourage others to accept nothing but the best materials when buying a guitar. Its simply not worth it to compromise...

Last edited by ponzi; 1 week ago at 04:37 PM..
Old 1 week ago
  #172
Gear Addict
 
Sniff's Avatar
 



I believed everything but the veganism.....
Old 1 week ago
  #173
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponzi View Post
I think its customary for people who don't want to answer a question in a forum, to simply not answer it. If we did otherwise, a simple question could receive hundreds of answers from people who did not feel like answering it.

Also another poster answered the question before you stated you would not answer it, so it didn't really need answering either way.
I answered the question, I merely omitted the lengthy corroboration. I even supplied the references, just didn't quote them.

The other person's answer was not entirely correct.
Old 1 week ago
  #174
Quote:
Originally Posted by puke View Post
About the blindfold study,.....Don't resort to lying. Leave your ego at home and you might learn something you didn't know the day before. The blindfold strad. story was not debunked.
It was thoroughly debunked. I debunked it myself on this very forum but I wasn't the only one to debunk it and this wasn't the only place.

The test was conducted incorrectly and it was done in acoustically unsuitable conditions. If you want the details, use the search function to find the original thread.

Furthermore the subject is not a suitable one for a double blind test.

It was a publicity stunt by somebody with a commercial interest is selling new violins.

A proper double blind test is fiendishly difficult to set up and execute correctly and it only suitable for a relatively small range of subjects, of which this is not one. There are too many uncontrollable variables.

Unfortunately double blind testing has become a sort of pseudo-religion in certain circles.

About the wood:

There is a HUGE difference in between the wood that is best for building musical instruments and wood suitable for high grade furniture.

Wood for furniture is chosen primarily for how attractive it is. For really expensive furniture you want really,. really beautiful wood.

For musical instruments, especially acoustic and semi-acoustic instruments but even for solid body guitars, albeit to a lesser degree, what is important is acoustic tone. A luthier choosing woods taps on the wood and listens for the right resonance for the type of instrument he wants to build.

Of course for high ticket guitars you also generally will want an attractive chunk of lumber, but if it doesn't sound good your instrument's gonna be a dog. Woof-woof. I've seen lots and lots of very pretty guitars that would have been more suitable for furniture. There are also different ways of cutting the raw log and those that yield the most suitable tone wood are also the most wasteful.

These are considerations that have no bearing on wood for furniture. Who cares if a chair leg or a table top has superior tone and resonance? Nobody, that's who.

My dad refinished and restored antique furniture for a hobby. He had a full woodworking shop in a refitted barn at our summer place in Maine when I was growing up. He furnished our entire house up there with his work.

Last edited by John Eppstein; 1 week ago at 02:17 AM..
Old 1 week ago
  #175
Lives for gear
 
ponzi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
I answered the question, I merely omitted the lengthy corroboration. I even supplied the references, just didn't quote them.

The other person's answer was not entirely correct.
I am aware that on the internet there are search engines, so in the future, it will not be necessary to point them out to me.
Old 1 week ago
  #176
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponzi View Post
I am reluctant to share my story, as I just want to be seen as one of the guys, but I have to side with John Eppstein on this due to my own experience.

Many years ago, as a young man, I was a pioneer in computing and had the good luck to have invented the 'enter' key. Being a minor contribution, it netted me a mere $100 million dollars, compared to the billions of my contemporaries Bill Gates and Larry Ellison. Nonetheless I was able to conserve my windfall and make a comfortable life for myself.

Initially I engaged in the basest hedonism: drugs, alcohol, women, and for a short time even engaged in veganism. However, I soon saw the spiritual emptiness in this lifestyle and resolved myself to make a meaningful contribution to society by building the ultimate guitar. It took me the better part of 30 years to assemble and I logged over a half million miles flying around the globe in the pursuit of the ultimate tone woods, and I am proud to say, I made my modest contribution to the guitar world as well.

The body was made from joists taken from a 1,000 year old monastery, who's mortgage I foreclosed on for this very purpose. I then turned my attention to the fretboard. I settled on some wood taken from a golf cart archaeologists recovered from the tomb of Amhenotep the elder. Carbon 14 dated it as being 5,000 years old, and it did sound noticeably better than 3,000 year old wood also recovered from the Valley Of The Kings. In fact, the guitar had so much mojo that it inspired the song Walk Like an Egyptian.

I still felt there was something missing. After much experimentation I found that a set of tuning key heads, fashioned from the tusks of a woolly mammoth that had been recovered completely intact from the Siberian permafrost, was the final touch I needed. Surely it goes without saying that the guitar held its tune even after the most vigorous use of the tremolo bar.

So, I encourage others to accept nothing but the best materials when buying a guitar. Its simply not worth it to compromise...
Excellent story.

Sadly, I still will not be able to contribute to your new investment opportunity.
Old 1 week ago
  #177
Quote:
Originally Posted by puke View Post
I still have one of his original V guitars.I think it's Mohagany,..but it's black and I can't say without pulling the electronics out.
A "wood expert" who can't spell "Mahogany". OK.

I assume that this probably means that you're not aware that "mahogany" refers to an entire group of different woods, some of which are totally unrelated to the "genuine" mahoganies. And that the "mahogany" used in the '50s Gibsons in currently unavailable under CITES.

Quote:
About the blindfold study,.....Don't resort to lying.
I never lie (except when asleep, in bed.) And I always post sitting upright.

Quote:
You can call gibson and ask them about their mohagany today vs. 1960.
I don't need to. The wood they used in 1960 and before (Honduran mahogany) is illegal now.

Quote:
I've talked to them a few times before but never asked them about that. I am not the one who feels like he gets beer poured in his wheaties if they still have the same quality mohagany they had in the 60s. Costs change, but if you pay, you can still get what you want.
Not legally, you can't.

Plus you simply can't get old growth woods of many types that ARE legal because they simply don't exist anymore, or the few old growth forests still extant are legally protected.

Quote:
They will probably tell you that the wood they use on their premium guitars today is more stable and consistent (better...if you make instruments) that it was back then.
I don't give a damn what their PR people tell the gullible public.

TOP U.S. FURNITURE MAKERS WARNED: ILLEGAL MAHOGANY FROM PERU THREATENS NATIVE PEOPLE, AMAZON FOREST | NRDC

There are some woods that are sold under the name "true mahogany" that are not "genuine" mahogany.There are still more woods that are neither "genuine mahogany" nor "true mahogany" that are sold as mahogany, including (but not limited to) "African mahogany" "Phillipean mahogany", and "Indian mahogany".

Mahogany - Wikipedia
Old 1 week ago
  #178
Gear Addict
 
Sniff's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
It was thoroughly debunked. I debunked it myself on this very forum but I wasn't the only one to debunk it and this wasn't the only place.
That's very interesting John.

Lots of claims on these forums can be debunked.
Old 1 week ago
  #179
Lives for gear
 
ponzi's Avatar
I think this will help explain it:

Old 1 week ago
  #180
Lives for gear
 
ponzi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Excellent story.

Sadly, I still will not be able to contribute to your new investment opportunity.
I must admit my pursuit of the ultimate tone-woods depleted my fortune, though clearly it was worth it. My nest egg is now down to a mere 7 million, and I have had to definitely pull my horns in a bit, so to speak, and watch my spending. However, at this point, I am still able to manage financially and will not need any extra contributions, though I do thank you for thinking of me om such a generous manner....
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
Syne Cosyne Dan / So many guitars, so little time
1
atomicvai / So many guitars, so little time
18
maxbarkly / Low End Theory
7
Airon / Low End Theory
1

Forum Jump
Forum Jump