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The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank
Old 6 days ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank

Here's some pictures of a Premier 90 Reverberation Unit, not sure of the exact date, there is a marking that says 1977 on a component inside of it. It also has a funny note on the Folded Line reverb tank itself.

It used to work, it was noisy though, but the reverb was very lush and drippy. I opened it up and took some photos, and now no sound passes through it.
Attached Thumbnails
The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_144438.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_144450.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_144512.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_145339.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_145407.jpg  

The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_145552.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_145559.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_145739.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_150530.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_150541.jpg  

The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180628_150550.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180705_144906.jpg   The Inside of a Premier 90 Reverb Tank-img_20180705_144911.jpg  
Old 5 days ago
  #2
Take it to a tech.
Old 5 days ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 
enorbet2's Avatar
---- Or, if you have any aspirations at becoming a tad more tech yourself you could start by learning to read schematics and acquiring a VOM, Signal Generator and Oscilloscope. The circuit is all preamp level so no high power load boxes are needed, just basic termination but it's fairly straightforward and simple.



One inserts a signal at the input and then, starting at the output, attaches the OScope probe and works backwards through the circuit until the signal shows up. At that point the failure will be in the next stage in the flow line that didn't pass the signal.... simple process of elimination.

That's the easiest and most visual method but it is sometimes possible to simply read all the voltages and find the one(s) that's "off". While a non functioning tube is possible from tube failure it is more common that the power supply fails. If a resistor failed it will often look "burned", but not always. Electrolytic caps have an "escape valve" bubble usually at the positive terminal and visually one can see evidence of leakage of electrolytic fluid.

As always, safety first, so learn before doing but it really isn't all that difficult to work on tube gear especially at preamp levels but you really do at least need to understand "the signal flow" when failure is as simple as "no signal".
Old 1 day ago
  #4
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post
---- Or, if you have any aspirations at becoming a tad more tech yourself you could start by learning to read schematics and acquiring a VOM, Signal Generator and Oscilloscope. The circuit is all preamp level so no high power load boxes are needed, just basic termination but it's fairly straightforward and simple.]

One inserts a signal at the input and then, starting at the output, attaches the OScope probe and works backwards through the circuit until the signal shows up. At that point the failure will be in the next stage in the flow line that didn't pass the signal.... simple process of elimination.

That's the easiest and most visual method but it is sometimes possible to simply read all the voltages and find the one(s) that's "off". While a non functioning tube is possible from tube failure it is more common that the power supply fails. If a resistor failed it will often look "burned", but not always. Electrolytic caps have an "escape valve" bubble usually at the positive terminal and visually one can see evidence of leakage of electrolytic fluid.

As always, safety first, so learn before doing but it really isn't all that difficult to work on tube gear especially at preamp levels but you really do at least need to understand "the signal flow" when failure is as simple as "no signal".
Thanks for the info, I will most likely take this to a tech in the near future though. I've tried repairing my own equipment in the past, and typically ended up leaving the gear worse off then when I started . I appreciate your suggestion, and insight though.
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