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How did they get this sound? Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 1 week ago
  #1
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mbvoxx's Avatar
How did they get this sound?

This was the only sub forum I could find that seemed to fit this question - it would be great if there was a forum specifically for music recording/production questions. Maybe there is and I overlooked it.....anyway


Just wondering if anyone might know, How the they get the guitar note sound that opens this song?

YouTube
Old 1 week ago
  #2

Sounds like a fuzz and a tremolo....



-tINY

Old 1 week ago
  #3
Maybe a Vox fuzz and tremolo. The Vox tremolo had closer to a square wave modulation than Fender's sine wave.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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kafka's Avatar
That's a pretty sharp wave on the tremolo. Maybe some kind of a tremolo pedal before the fuzz? That might cause it to gate more tightly.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by kafka View Post
That's a pretty sharp wave on the tremolo. Maybe some kind of a tremolo pedal before the fuzz? That might cause it to gate more tightly.
It sounds to me like the built-in FX in the Thomas Organ SS Vox amps. They've reference the "Super Beatle" in interviews and I seem to recall them endorsing Vox at the time.
Old 6 days ago
  #6
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allphourus's Avatar
 

I don't fully understand this nor have I tried it (so it is unsubstantiated rumor) But I read somewhere that there is a way to inter connect two identical Fender amps with reverb using the sends and returns to the reverb tank that will yield this effect. It feeds the Vibrato back though the amp and vibratos it a second time . In any case there was a local cover band that did this song verbatim using fender amplification when this song was popular, Memory is vague it was a long time ago, Jr HS, 8th or 9th grade, but I still remember their name "The Square Root of Five" and they were a damn good band the most popular in the Central Jersey area. I'm positive that the lead guitarist used two smaller Fender amps Princetons or Deluxes or something similar.

I have always Heard that it was Vox amps on the recording as stated above.

I played with another guitarist for a while who used an Ampeg Porta flex flip top with two 10s it had that square wave type Tremolo like the Vox Repeat Percussion Tremolo , he could achieve an kind of false repeat echo using it and the reverb together but not the Electric Prune's sound. I had a Vox Viscount solid state amp for a while and I never got anything like that out of it
Old 6 days ago
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by allphourus View Post
I don't fully understand this nor have I tried it (so it is unsubstantiated rumor) But I read somewhere that there is a way to inter connect two identical Fender amps with reverb using the sends and returns to the reverb tank that will yield this effect. It feeds the Vibrato back though the amp and vibratos it a second time . In any case there was a local cover band that did this song verbatim using fender amplification when this song was popular, Memory is vague it was a long time ago, Jr HS, 8th or 9th grade, but I still remember their name "The Square Root of Five" and they were a damn good band the most popular in the Central Jersey area. I'm positive that the lead guitarist used two smaller Fender amps Princetons or Deluxes or something similar.

I have always Heard that it was Vox amps on the recording as stated above.

I played with another guitarist for a while who used an Ampeg Porta flex flip top with two 10s it had that square wave type Tremolo like the Vox Repeat Percussion Tremolo , he could achieve an kind of false repeat echo using it and the reverb together but not the Electric Prune's sound. I had a Vox Viscount solid state amp for a while and I never got anything like that out of it
I have never heard of connecting two Fender amps as you describe and frankly I don't see how it could be possible. There was a device called (IIRC) "The Cube" that allowed the reverb circuit to be used as an overdrive (disabling the reverb tank), but not connecting two amps together. And it didn't affect the tremolo circuit - Fender tremolos use a sine wave oscillator, not a square wave like the Vox.

Vox did make outboard tremolo and fuzz effects boxers - perhaps the band you remember was using those. Vox also made a guitar with those effects built in.
Old 23 hours ago
  #8
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Haha... didn't know the op question was an Electric Prunes thing. I saw them a couple of times in 1966 and once in 1967. Ken's guitar playing live sounded just like on their first record. He played some really cool stuff and I remember dissecting that first album.

Ken's sound on the first records? 1958 Les Paul with Bigsby, fuzz box and then into either a Super Beatle or Fender with tremelo generally turned on. In fact, Spagnola (Weasel) usually had his amp's tremelo on too.

The first 7 seconds or so of the single-note guitar hit on "I Had Too Much To Dream" are a note at the edge of feedback...... through the fuzz box.... into the amp w/tremelo on... and Ken wiggling the Bigsby a little.....heavily limited on the console return to tape.....and...... it's a backward loop.

The tape was recorded with Ken noodling around with different single notes for a while with a single-track tape machine on and recording.... then, the tape was turned over... and that 9-second snip chosen of all the backwards stuff...razor bladed out to an edit on a reel of tape....and then flown in to the 4 track multi.

At about 9 seconds in to the intro loop, you hear Ken hit another, somewhat cleaner, note (fuzzed and with tremelo), and that is what signals the bass, rhythm guitar to come in.

Listen to his use of volume pedal too. Such as on the Joe Walsh written "Bangles" on the first album. Strange cool guitars on that tune as well as on everything on side 1 imo.

"Train to Tomorrow" is the only song I know of in the history of history (other than the later Rock & Roll Woman by Buffalo Springfield) to be a tune that moves from D to F. I mean... who has songs that move from D to F? Pretty Cool.

That band was very very very good live. They were all on SuperBeatles when I saw them. The drummer played really hard.... sort of like Jonny Barbata did when I would see him play. The band was fun to watch in the midst of the zillions of concerts I would see in the 1960s.

The band got to know Jimi Hendrix during one of their tours before Jimi was recording. He liked the Prunes stuff and some say that the general neighborhood of the intro idea of Foxy Lady is because of Jimi's like of the "Too Much to Dream" track.

Long live Bigsby. Long live the MosRite (or any other) Fuzz box, long live tremelo. Long live tape.

Last edited by thenoodle; 23 hours ago at 03:18 AM..
Old 3 hours ago
  #9
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mbvoxx's Avatar
thanks! - thenoodle.....

that sounds logical and quite doable in a live setting... The Bigsby is the secret weapon!
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