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Gibson Sg's are they any good? Electric Guitar
Old 5 days ago
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Gibson Sg's are they any good?

Hi,

I am looking to get a new guitar which has two humbuckers. I already have a Jazz Master and I am looking for something for a heavy metal/rock tone.

An SG springs to mind but are the new ones any good?
Old 5 days ago
  #2
Here for the gear
 

I like em! I have a early 90's black nitro special I got on ebay for a song. Been a solid work horse for years. I did change out the pick ups cause i do not like the stock ones much. Has always sounded best to me paired with a marshall-y sounding amp and that'll do for your rock tone.
I think you just gotta get your hands on it and see how it feels. Its just a slab of wood and the neck is where all the action is. Some are gonna be better than others, but that also not to say you cant have a luther dress it up for ya.
I played a recent special and it seemed fine to me. No better or worse feeling than mine that's almost 30 years old.
I'm also not the pickiest person about guitars so maybe take that into account too.
Old 5 days ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Unclenny's Avatar
What's not to like about the venerable SG?

Seriously, though....folks either love them or they don't. I can't speak for new ones but I love the tone and the thin tapered neck of this '71 Deluxe.

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Gibson Sg's are they any good?-im000719.jpg  
Old 5 days ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 

My second guitar back in the Mid 70's was a 67 Epiphone Riviera. Had it for a year then did a swap for a mid 60's SG.
I'm still trying to figure out the exact year of that guitar. It has the looks of a Derik Trucks SG, even had the Nickle Harp Tailpiece which a typically associated with a vibrato but the guitar didn't have vibrato.

The neck on it was the other oddity. Besides being as fat as a 12 string, I think it may have been 25.5" long. It might have been a custom built Gibson. Living 70 miles from NYC you'd get allot of find instruments circulating in the music stores back then. The guy who had the guitar bought it used from Manny's in NY which was a well known dealer back then. I haven't been able to find an exact match. Granted its been 40+ years since I owned it but the PAF's in that thing sounded amazing. It sounded how a Gibson should sound, not generic like a lot of new versions I've played.

I had to really reach on that thing to play chords on that fat neck. It really slowed me down coming from the Epiphone which has a super slim neck.
I kept the guitar for about a year then swapped back with the guy and got the Riviera back. I still like the sound of the Mini's over full sized HB's

If you buy an SG, be sure to try it out first. Make sure its got the pickups you want. My buddy bought a new SG a few years ago and had the pickups and pickguard color modified. He loved it but I thought the thing sounded like garbage. His 70's Norlin era Paul which I restored for him blows the doors off that SG. My conclusion is the hotter wound pickups he put in there narrowed the frequency response and it produces nothing but driven mid tones.
Old 4 days ago
  #5
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lethem View Post
... are the new ones any good?


SG's are lovely guitars, great tone as other good Gibsons, but way lighter and comfy to play ..

Older, the better, not recent production, for sure.

What else can one ask for ..
Old 4 days ago
  #6
Good ones are great.

Bad ones are anywhere from "meh" to atrocious.

Play before you buy.
Old 4 days ago
  #7
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Good ones are great.

Bad ones are anywhere from "meh" to atrocious.

Play before you buy.


This applies to any guitar, any brand and model, I believe ..
Old 4 days ago
  #8
Lives for gear
 
kennybro's Avatar
SG suck. Especially the original 60's models. Send them all to me, and I'll see that they are properly destroyed.
Old 4 days ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 
allphourus's Avatar
 

I have a late 60s early 70s SG Custom (I don't actually Know because Gibson Serial numbers are screwed up during that period), It's heavily modified today but was not a bad guitar to begin with , I just kept experimenting with it till I made it uniquely mine. I had a 64 Les Paul before that , same as an SG Custom, which was a much better guitar than the latter model. It had a wider fatter neck that I preferred and the Pickups were truly something special. It had neck problems because it was butchered by a hammer mechanic at Dennis's Electronics ( Across from Muscara's Music in Beleville NJ back in the early 70's ) trying change the nut. It was eventually diagnosed and repaired properly by Rod Shopher as the fretboard separated from the the neck but it still had cracked and chip paint down the underside of the neck along the binding and I sold it , and still regret doing so to this day. I probably couldn't afford to by another like it today.

Last edited by allphourus; 4 days ago at 03:51 AM..
Old 4 days ago
  #10
Lives for gear
 
stratology's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by allphourus View Post
I have a late 60s early 70s SG Custom (I don't actually Know because Gibson Serial numbers are screwed up during that period)

Ha, same here, mine is either from '67 or '73, depending on who you believe.

Great sounding guitar, but does not stay in tune well enough for stage use (that's, of course, after replacing tuners, making sure that the nut slot is filed correctly and lubricated, and all other common steps to improve tuning stability).
Old 4 days ago
  #11
Pete Townsend loved them. They were easier to break than a Les Paul.
Old 4 days ago
  #12
Gear Addict
 
dcwave's Avatar
 

I tend to like them.
Old 4 days ago
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakao View Post
This applies to any guitar, any brand and model, I believe ..
But more so to SGs than most. The "rubber neck" problem, for example - SGs are affected by it more than just about any other guitars, due to the delicate neck joint on most. And those that don't have it often have that great loggy block running a quarter of the way up the neck.

The rubber neck problem commonly is the source of tuning problems among players who don't treat them with a really gentle, light touch. After all, when the weight of the guitar can throw it out of tune when you support the neck with your hand that could be a problem, right? Not to mention the problems it can cause in setting intonation.
Old 3 days ago
  #14
Gear Addict
 
dcwave's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
But more so to SGs than most. The "rubber neck" problem, for example - SGs are affected by it more than just about any other guitars, due to the delicate neck joint on most. And those that don't have it often have that great loggy block running a quarter of the way up the neck.

The rubber neck problem commonly is the source of tuning problems among players who don't treat them with a really gentle, light touch. After all, when the weight of the guitar can throw it out of tune when you support the neck with your hand that could be a problem, right? Not to mention the problems it can cause in setting intonation.

Never had those problems at all.
And I am no light touch player.
I guess I am lucky.
Old 3 days ago
  #15
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
But more so to SGs than most. The "rubber neck" problem, for example - SGs are affected by it more than just about any other guitars, due to the delicate neck joint on most. And those that don't have it often have that great loggy block running a quarter of the way up the neck.

The rubber neck problem commonly is the source of tuning problems among players who don't treat them with a really gentle, light touch. After all, when the weight of the guitar can throw it out of tune when you support the neck with your hand that could be a problem, right? Not to mention the problems it can cause in setting intonation.


In my 40+ years of professional playing (and many SG's during the time) I've never heard of 'rubber neck' or any other issues that SG may have with the neck joint.

All my SGs were equally stable in the neck department as my Les Pauls.
Old 2 days ago
  #16
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Bob Ross's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unclenny View Post
What's not to like about the venerable SG?
...[snip]...
I can't speak for new ones but ...
Well, that's the problem: Like many guitars -- and perhaps Gibsons especially -- the new ones often only resemble the older ones in general appearance.

I've played a few early 70s SGs that were absolutely killer axes. I've played some early 80s SGs that were turds. I have no idea what a 2018 SG is like, but I think the best advice is to play as many examples as possible and find the one that speaks to you. Don't expect consistency from unit to unit.
Old 2 days ago
  #17
Gear Nut
 

Borrow one, at least for a couple hours, and see if it's ergonomic for you. The strap button is in a weird place and they're neck-heavy, so they're not for everybody.
Old 2 days ago
  #18
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Mikhael's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakao View Post
In my 40+ years of professional playing (and many SG's during the time) I've never heard of 'rubber neck' or any other issues that SG may have with the neck joint.

All my SGs were equally stable in the neck department as my Les Pauls.
Oh, I have. Especially the ones that had the neck pickup in the traditional Gibson space. There's not a whole lot of wood in the neck joint on an SG, due to its thin body, neck pickup cavity, and double cutaway.

One thing I never understood - once Gibson moved the pickup away from the neck, why didn't they stick two more frets on the fretboard? You've got room for a 24-fret neck, why not use it?
Old 2 days ago
  #19
Gear Addict
 
dcwave's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikhael View Post
Oh, I have. Especially the ones that had the neck pickup in the traditional Gibson space. There's not a whole lot of wood in the neck joint on an SG, due to its thin body, neck pickup cavity, and double cutaway.

One thing I never understood - once Gibson moved the pickup away from the neck, why didn't they stick two more frets on the fretboard? You've got room for a 24-fret neck, why not use it?
They did on some. My SGJ has 24, and thus the neckpup is closer to the bridge. However, my Standard and Faded, the neck pup is in the usual place.
Old 2 days ago
  #20
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Mikhael's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dcwave View Post
They did on some. My SGJ has 24, and thus the neckpup is closer to the bridge. However, my Standard and Faded, the neck pup is in the usual place.
Really? Snug up against the 22nd fret?
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