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Ac.guitar is hard to play Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 31st March 2018
  #31
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I love it. Strict alternate picking on acoustic guitar, powering through the strings with various patterns and sequences is like my meditation.
Old 31st March 2018
  #32
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
One never knows, I might even like the song. I am something of an aesthetic outlier.


I know you don't tend to post your own music, but is there any place where the curious could check it out?
Actually, I've posted a lot, or at least seems to me. Probably more of the day-job stuff.

Anyway, the version of me who gets up in front of people in LA and sporadically tries to penetrate Nashville is G.Q. Stedley (long story).

Here's G.Q.'s Soundcloud page.

The song with the funny tuning is "A Pretty Good Day."
Old 31st March 2018
  #33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Actually, I've posted a lot, or at least seems to me. Probably more of the day-job stuff.

Anyway, the version of me who gets up in front of people in LA and sporadically tries to penetrate Nashville is G.Q. Stedley (long story).

Here's G.Q.'s Soundcloud page.

The song with the funny tuning is "A Pretty Good Day."
Oh, yeah, and I definitely enjoy the day job stuff and appreciate the skill that goes into getting the clean, professional sounds you capture, but sometimes it's fun to get a glimpse of the artistic side of some of the personalities here I don't automatically associate with their own music.

"A Pretty Good Day" is really nice. You have a fine, characterful voice. The song's quite nicely done... but... it's not... droney...

Good work, man! (Listening to some more tunes as I write. Good stuff, you have pretty focused vision of the musical personality/style you want to present, sounds like. )
Old 31st March 2018
  #34
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
... you have pretty focused vision of the musical personality/style you want to present, sounds like.
I think I'm learning to work within the bounds of my limitations. In Popeye terms, "I yam what I yam."
Old 31st March 2018
  #35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
I think I'm learning to work within the bounds of my limitations. In Popeye terms, "I yam what I yam."
Some really nice songwriting and storytelling. Nice arrangements, solid, on-point contemporary country/Americana production and nice playing. Is it all pretty much you or do you bring in ringers, er, I mean, have a band or guest musicos?
Old 31st March 2018
  #36
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
Some really nice songwriting and storytelling. Nice arrangements, solid, on-point contemporary country/Americana production and nice playing. Is it all pretty much you or do you bring in ringers, er, I mean, have a band or guest musicos?
Me myself and I. On the recordings, anyway.

Live, there are a couple bands, friends of mine, that I've conned into learning a song or two and they let me get up and interrupt their set.

Gigging with side people in LA is expensive, especially if it's a non-democracy. But I know folks that do it.
Old 31st March 2018
  #37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Me myself and I. On the recordings, anyway.

Live, there are a couple bands, friends of mine, that I've conned into learning a song or two and they let me get up and interrupt their set.

Gigging with side people in LA is expensive, especially if it's a non-democracy. But I know folks that do it.
An impressive selection of work, particularly from one guy.

Me, I've never been able to afford anything but musical democracy, anyhow.
Old 6th April 2018
  #38
Quote:
Originally Posted by thehightenor View Post
+1

Speaking as a professional pianist 35+ years and guitarist for 25+ years I can say without doubt all guitar playing is difficult compared to keyboards.

I learnt piano and keyboards like falling of a log - the guitar continues to challenge me.

The musical arrangement of the strings is bonkers (like 6 off-set keyboards) and the whole experience is physically demanding - especially compared to piano which in comparison is easy.

You can remove a guitar string and use it as a cheese cutter :-)

Still guitar imho is an incredibly expressive instrument and worth every hour I put into trying to master it.
<chuckle>

It all depends on how you look at it. Keyboard is laid out in a linear fashion so it's easy to see one note going after another, true, but otherwise it's a real PITA in a lot of ways. On keyboard each and every scale requires its own fingering. That makes a consistent technique impossible. Licks that are dead easy in one key may be much more difficult in another key and nearly impossible to perform in another. Complex chord voicings may be difficult or impossible to reach.

Guitar is more confusing at first glance, but there are really only FOUR scale fingerings to memorize, and these interlock. That makes transposition into any key a no-brainer and nearly any lick can be executed in any key. Chord voicing can be spread over a relatively wide range and again, they repeat up the neck so you don't need to re-figure your fingerings for a different key.

This makes guitar much easier than keyboard in a lot of ways.
Old 6th April 2018
  #39
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
<chuckle>

It all depends on how you look at it. Keyboard is laid out in a linear fashion so it's easy to see one note going after another, true, but otherwise it's a real PITA in a lot of ways. On keyboard each and every scale requires its own fingering. That makes a consistent technique impossible. Licks that are dead easy in one key may be much more difficult in another key and nearly impossible to perform in another. Complex chord voicings may be difficult or impossible to reach.

Guitar is more confusing at first glance, but there are really only FOUR scale fingerings to memorize, and these interlock. That makes transposition into any key a no-brainer and nearly any lick can be executed in any key. Chord voicing can be spread over a relatively wide range and again, they repeat up the neck so you don't need to re-figure your fingerings for a different key.

This makes guitar much easier than keyboard in a lot of ways.
Yes it's swings and roundabouts.

But still I found learning keyboards so easy, and guitar very difficult.

It's all right their on keyboards in written black and white - literally
Old 6th April 2018
  #40
Gear Guru
Keyboard is a lot easier when you can use the synth pitch and play in one key!......
Old 6th April 2018
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thehightenor View Post
Yes it's swings and roundabouts.

But still I found learning keyboards so easy, and guitar very difficult.

It's all right their on keyboards in written black and white - literally
It could be because you got your brain wired up for keyboards at an earlier age. You learned to think of the notes in a linear fashion, developed a spacial awareness that allowed you to quickly find what you wanted on a keyboard, automatically translating notes in your head to muscle movements. And this early training didn't port so well to guitar.
Old 7th April 2018
  #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Sun View Post
Ac.guitar is hard to play
especially "F"
that "F" chord is really hard

it hurts your fingers
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Ac.guitar is hard to play-screen-shot-2018-04-06-7.27.40-pm.png  
Old 7th April 2018
  #43
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Shi-hit, hurts my hands on electric so what is your point?
Old 7th April 2018
  #44
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
<chuckle>

It all depends on how you look at it. Keyboard is laid out in a linear fashion so it's easy to see one note going after another, true, but otherwise it's a real PITA in a lot of ways. On keyboard each and every scale requires its own fingering. That makes a consistent technique impossible. Licks that are dead easy in one key may be much more difficult in another key and nearly impossible to perform in another. Complex chord voicings may be difficult or impossible to reach.

Guitar is more confusing at first glance, but there are really only FOUR scale fingerings to memorize, and these interlock. That makes transposition into any key a no-brainer and nearly any lick can be executed in any key. Chord voicing can be spread over a relatively wide range and again, they repeat up the neck so you don't need to re-figure your fingerings for a different key.

This makes guitar much easier than keyboard in a lot of ways.
I just want to thank you for that. I've noticed in my 'longish' life that everyone thinks their instrument/job/situation is the most difficult. Nice to see that someone from the 'guitar' side can appreciate that all instruments have their challenges.
Old 7th April 2018
  #45
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by u87allen View Post
It could be because you got your brain wired up for keyboards at an earlier age. You learned to think of the notes in a linear fashion, developed a spacial awareness that allowed you to quickly find what you wanted on a keyboard, automatically translating notes in your head to muscle movements. And this early training didn't port so well to guitar.
Yes you're probably right.

I also learnt drums at an earlier age, piano and drums are both percussion family instruments and very linear in their approach.

I have played guitar for over 25 years and to your average man in the street they'd probably think I'm a pretty good guitarist.

Guitar is a very enjoyable challenge :-)
Old 7th April 2018
  #46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ardis View Post
Keyboard is a lot easier when you can use the synth pitch and play in one key!......
Irving Berlin.

That being said, using a synth loses the expressiveness of a piano.
Old 7th April 2018
  #47
Gear Guru
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Irving Berlin.

That being said, using a synth loses the expressiveness of a piano.
Yeah being self taught I have to cheat...Basically pitch to voice what I’m writing....

I really miss having a piano. Electric is fun but acoustic harmonics are nectar of the Gods, in a piano or a guitar.
Old 8th April 2018
  #48


You are on the journey. The more you learn the more you realize you don't know. This realization you have had is a victory in and of itself, it means you're now ready for the hard bit - overcoming the problem that you have identified.

This guy nicely encapsulates the learning process :

Old 8th April 2018
  #49
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdme_sadie View Post


You are on the journey. The more you learn the more you realize you don't know. This realization you have had is a victory in and of itself, it means you're now ready for the hard bit - overcoming the problem that you have identified
Agree totally with the sentiment in the video even though it was way longer than necessary. My issue is with the X axis on the graphic. Wisdom? No. Maybe knowledge, success, self-satisfaction, contentment...I don't know. But it ain't wisdom. Especially in this day and age and especially in the art world which is (for the most part) driven by emotion, a HUGE impediment to wisdom.

Please folks. Please don't confuse educated with wise. They're two VERY different things. And with the atmosphere at most Universities these days, you're more likely to come out a very educated fool.
Old 8th April 2018
  #50
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G-Sun's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdme_sadie View Post
You are on the journey. The more you learn the more you realize you don't know. This realization you have had is a victory in and of itself, it means you're now ready for the hard bit - overcoming the problem that you have identified.
Indeed
Doing some discoveries and tutorials on right-hand technique
Old 8th April 2018
  #51
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Sun View Post
Indeed
Doing some discoveries and tutorials on right-hand technique
I think it's probably a good thing to formally investigate and 'study' technique early on.


But, at this point (playing not well but enthusiastically for decades), I have found it best to not think much about what either of my hands are doing. After many years, the motor systems controlling my hands seem to have a pretty clear 'understanding' of what to do to try to deliver the music I'm imagining as I play it.

(I primarily improvise because my serial memory has always been highly challenged; growing up, other kids could memorize long poems and such. Not me. And, for whatever reasons, while I can decipher standard notation to a certain extent, even after decades, when I see a staff full of notes -- even single note lines! -- the whole thing just swims in front of my eyes abstractly. I have to go in and count bar lines. I guess I'm just 'standard notation dyslexic.' I certainly have a touch of it in my reading and spelling, as well, though I never heard the term until I was in college).


Anyhow, on a couple occasions I've 'marveled' at the relative sophistication my 'hands' have developed at their two very different tasks (and now the right has gotten restless and started adding in rhythmic accents... didn't even notice it happening). But if I try to examine those subconsciously-evolved techniques, it just seems to muddy and confuse things, so, basically, at this point, I just think about the sounds I WANT to hear and give my motor system and its subconscious conduit to my musical impulses the room to work that out...

But I suspect that the foundation of conscious approach to technique early on probably helped give me a more solid grasp.

Still, whether you call it 'motor memory' (it's more than just memory, of course; I can see the shape of the mostly unconscious processing when I observe my own playing and practice) or some more timely, fashionable term, the bottom line is that one will hopefully grow to include a number of fairly complex process as 'second nature' -- in order to best give a good conduit for one's musical imagination to the instrument.
Old 8th April 2018
  #52
Quote:
Originally Posted by onewire View Post
Agree totally with the sentiment in the video even though it was way longer than necessary. My issue is with the X axis on the graphic. Wisdom? No. Maybe knowledge, success, self-satisfaction, contentment...I don't know. But it ain't wisdom. Especially in this day and age and especially in the art world which is (for the most part) driven by emotion, a HUGE impediment to wisdom.

Please folks. Please don't confuse educated with wise. They're two VERY different things. And with the atmosphere at most Universities these days, you're more likely to come out a very educated fool.
No, "wisdom" is the correct word. It's the point a which you're so completely assimilated the fact that the more you know, the more there is to learn that you just kinda sit there and giggle at the majesty of it all.

And it really has very little to do with formal education.

Universities? Well I grew up as a "University Brat". For the most part universities are for the employment and reproduction of pedants who like to play politics. As often as not they work to impede the learning process. They can, however, be an excellent source of access to facilities and materials for those who knows how to utilize such things for their own ends. And they're a great place to meet like minded people.
Old 8th April 2018
  #53
Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
I think it's probably a good thing to formally investigate and 'study' technique early on.


But, at this point (playing not well but enthusiastically for decades), I have found it best to not think much about what either of my hands are doing. After many years, the motor systems controlling my hands seem to have a pretty clear 'understanding' of what to do to try to deliver the music I'm imagining as I play it.

(I primarily improvise because my serial memory has always been highly challenged; growing up, other kids could memorize long poems and such. Not me. And, for whatever reasons, while I can decipher standard notation to a certain extent, even after decades, when I see a staff full of notes -- even single note lines! -- the whole thing just swims in front of my eyes abstractly. I have to go in and count bar lines. I guess I'm just 'standard notation dyslexic.' I certainly have a touch of it in my reading and spelling, as well, though I never heard the term until I was in college).


Anyhow, on a couple occasions I've 'marveled' at the relative sophistication my 'hands' have developed at their two very different tasks (and now the right has gotten restless and started adding in rhythmic accents... didn't even notice it happening). But if I try to examine those subconsciously-evolved techniques, it just seems to muddy and confuse things, so, basically, at this point, I just think about the sounds I WANT to hear and give my motor system and its subconscious conduit to my musical impulses the room to work that out...

But I suspect that the foundation of conscious approach to technique early on probably helped give me a more solid grasp.

Still, whether you call it 'motor memory' (it's more than just memory, of course; I can see the shape of the mostly unconscious processing when I observe my own playing and practice) or some more timely, fashionable term, the bottom line is that one will hopefully grow to include a number of fairly complex process as 'second nature' -- in order to best give a good conduit for one's musical imagination to the instrument.
Ah, the moment of transcendence when you find yourself just watching and marveling at what the hands are doing....
Old 8th April 2018
  #54
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
And it really has very little to do with formal education.
Totally agree with this. Still not convinced with your first paragraph, I'll think on it.

AND like minded (or faking it) is a prerequisite at the majority of Universities if you don't want to risk ruining your future after the VAST amount of wasted money spent there (depends on your major). I'll exempt engineering and mathematical disciplines, but even the so called sciences are being infiltrated.

I'm aware of your history but the University is nothing more than a political 'seminary' any more. Even High Schools now. Useless subjects, funded by taxpayers, taught by adolescents who have never left school. Add to that, Golden Parachute retirements that no ordinary person gets but have to fund with their tax money at public Uni's...well...

Obviously PC isn't my forte. Sorry for taking this OT.

Last edited by onewire; 8th April 2018 at 09:00 PM.. Reason: Added apology.
Old 9th April 2018
  #55
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I'm at a loss, other than yeah, it's harder to play (which is the norm) and it's MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH harder to record properly.

I think I'm in the "fair enough" category w/o too much hate
Old 9th April 2018
  #56
Gear Guru
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Ah, the moment of transcendence when you find yourself just watching and marveling at what the hands are doing....
Kinda funny when you see a video of yourself playing and say, wow that guy is pretty good!......
Old 9th April 2018
  #57
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
[colleges] can, however, be an excellent source of access to facilities and materials for those who knows how to utilize such things for their own ends. And they're a great place to meet like minded people.
There's a college near me that has little practice rooms with nicely maintained Yamaha U1's. And I've got an Apogee 01 and Reaper on a laptop.
Old 9th April 2018
  #58
Quote:
Originally Posted by onewire View Post
Totally agree with this. Still not convinced with your first paragraph, I'll think on it.

AND like minded (or faking it) is a prerequisite at the majority of Universities if you don't want to risk ruining your future after the VAST amount of wasted money spent there (depends on your major). I'll exempt engineering and mathematical disciplines, but even the so called sciences are being infiltrated.

I'm aware of your history but the University is nothing more than a political 'seminary' any more. Even High Schools now. Useless subjects, funded by taxpayers, taught by adolescents who have never left school. Add to that, Golden Parachute retirements that no ordinary person gets but have to fund with their tax money at public Uni's...well...

Obviously PC isn't my forte. Sorry for taking this OT.
Universities still have things available to students like well equipped photo labs, practice rooms, video equipment, etc, etc, that can be turned to one's own ends in one has the sense. Sometimes even recording studios.
Old 22nd April 2018
  #59
Here for the gear
 

Is it just me, or am I the only one that finds electric harder to play? Anytime I solo on electric, my articulation isn't as good and I'm a little more sloppy. And I can never tell if something is bad because of tone or technique. Rhythm playing is about the same difficulty on both instruments for me.
Old 22nd April 2018
  #60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluefire98 View Post
Is it just me, or am I the only one that finds electric harder to play? Anytime I solo on electric, my articulation isn't as good and I'm a little more sloppy. And I can never tell if something is bad because of tone or technique. Rhythm playing is about the same difficulty on both instruments for me.
Considering what you say, I wonder if stringing your electric with heavier gauge strings might not help, giving you a more familiar feel?

I know when I've been playing AG a lot and switch to electric, I can have a tendency to use too much/improper force with my left hand and push strings sideways (and so out of tune) just a bit. Using a heavier gauge on your EG might give you more of the 'resistance' that you're used to on your acoustic.
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