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PRS SE vs Les Paul
Old 1 week ago
  #1
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Thread Starter
PRS SE vs Les Paul

Hi,

I am looking for a new guitar and i have been checking out two options.
The PRS SE Custom 24, and the Gibson Les Paul Tribute T, as they are about the same price.

I was just wondering if anyone have had any experience with any of these guitars and if you would recommend them, and why?
Old 1 week ago
  #2
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davet's Avatar
 

PRS for sure

I have a 96 Custom 24, birds 10 top and a 69 Les Paul. Both great guitars, but the LP lives in it's case. The PRS gets all the work. Why?? Because the PRS weighs less. My typical gig is three hours and I don't sit down. Standing up hours at a time with a LP really is uncomfortable.

When I was 20, no big deal on weight. At 69, yeah - weight makes a difference.
Moreover, the PRS is a bit smaller and it fits my stature just fine. If you're a big guy the LP might work OK.

I've played many of the SE models and they are pretty good guitars for the money. Not so sure how well the hardware will do over time, that's usually where low priced instruments begin to fail.

FWIW, the Custom 24 works as a great all around guitar. Doesn't do a Tele sound all that well, but for the pop/rock I play it works just fine.

YMMV..
Old 1 week ago
  #3
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Complicated....

On one hand, the Gibson is a Gibson. It plays great, looks pretty nice and definitely sounds great. The newer ones are significantly lighter than anything made in '69. No binding and no gloss finish. Probably somewhat better resale.

The PRS looks, plays and sounds great. Nicer finish, binding and 24 frets. Of course, it doesn't say Gibson on the headstock.

They are both nice guitars, so you won't get hurt, whatever you decide. Go down to GC and try them out. Choose the one that suits you best.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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enorbet2's Avatar
I do hope you post here what you decide and why. I have some personal reasons for my views on this "shootout" so I won't bore you with details but I am interested in how and what you choose especially since it is unlikely any choice will be bad.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FLoyd1021 View Post
Hi,

I am looking for a new guitar and i have been checking out two options.
The PRS SE Custom 24, and the Gibson Les Paul Tribute T, as they are about the same price.

I was just wondering if anyone have had any experience with any of these guitars and if you would recommend them, and why?
Well, I replaced the pickups in my PRS (Santana) twice and am finally am loving it. The Les Paul sounded balls to wall since day one and is the best recording guitar I have, hands down. My LP is a 2008 and is weight relieved so that isn't a terrible burden. I do love the PRS, but I find the go to guitar is the LP, then the Am Std Strat, then the PRS. All three are great guitars. You will be winner either way!
Old 1 week ago
  #6
My PRS Custom 22 was my one-and-only gigging guitar for years. Light as a feather and nice to play, but I always needed to tweak the EQ in front of most rigs because it seemed to have an unpleasant boom at around 250hz.

Some PRS's have quite an interesting 5-way selection of pickup selection options too, if you want that kind of versatility.

Never owned a Les Paul, but whenever I see anyone playing it live, I always love the sound. If they are getting lighter, maybe I should take another look...
Old 1 week ago
  #7
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Thread Starter
Thank you for all the answers. I am new to the forum and was a bit nervous.

My reasoning so far on picking a guitar:

From what i know the PRS SE are made in Korea, while the Gibson is made in the USA. Not that this is very important to me, but there is a small part of me that want to pick the USA made. It might be better resale value as one of you said also.
But i kinda like the point that the PRS may be a bit more versatile

The reason i am buying a new guitar is because i already have a fender strat and want something with a humbucker. I play all kinds of music so versatility might be a factor. I don't play live so weight is not really a problem for me, but i do think the Les Paul is weight relieved.

I am currently leaning towards the PRS. I have also been looking at the PRS SE 245, but this seems to be very similar to a LP, and if i'm gonna go that route i might as well buy the LP.

BTW, the reason for me asking this is because none of my local guitar shops stock any of these guitars, so any input you have is very helpful to me.
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Lives for gear
 

I have a US made PRS P22 (custom 22 but with the piezo pick up).
Came very close to buying a LP as I love those as well, but research led me to the conclusion that build quality for that year verses this year etc was just too all over the map. The P22 cost significantly more here in Australia, but its a very nice guitar.
Old 1 week ago
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FLoyd1021 View Post
...From what i know the PRS SE are made in Korea, while the Gibson is made in the USA. Not that this is very important to me, but there is a small part of me that want to pick the USA made...
Many USA built Gibsons are nothing to write home about, really. The PRS (even a Korean one) will be a flawless instrument.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
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Well, were it me, I would get the PRS SE 24 Floyd - that's right, with a Floyd Rose vibrato. I would switch out pickups, simply because I know the sound that *I* want, and arrange the series/parallel switching that I use. That would make for a formidably versatile instrument. The reason I have not done that is because I would have to move the Floyd assembly back 1/8", and after having done that on my Hamer, I found it to be a PITA mod. That shouldn't bother you, though. The reason for that is the installation of a Graphtech Ghost piezo system, making the instrument incredibly versatile.
Old 1 week ago
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikhael View Post
Well, were it me, I would get the PRS SE 24 Floyd - that's right, with a Floyd Rose vibrato. I would switch out pickups, simply because I know the sound that *I* want, and arrange the series/parallel switching that I use. That would make for a formidably versatile instrument. The reason I have not done that is because I would have to move the Floyd assembly back 1/8", and after having done that on my Hamer, I found it to be a PITA mod. That shouldn't bother you, though. The reason for that is the installation of a Graphtech Ghost piezo system, making the instrument incredibly versatile.
Hm. don't know about getting a floyd rose. I have owned an Ibanez with a floyd rose like system on before, and it was not something ill need for my use. I do however agree on picking the PRS, as i see most people say that the SE line are good guitars. Depending on if i like the sound or not i might consider a pickup change, but it sounds good to me, based on the videos i've seen. I will just have to see how it pairs with my amp. Thanks for your input though.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
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enorbet2's Avatar
Unless Night Ranger warbles are a big part of your sound I don't understand the desire for a Floyd Rose on a PRS. To me it is such a joy to not have to worry about an allan wrench if a string breaks. I like being able to adjust tuning while playing instead of having to have a few minutes "fiddling" when I should be git fiddling. I don't want to have to have a 2nd guitar on the ready or a handy roadie. In all seriousness, what is there, these days, that a Floyd offers that a PRS whammy doesn't.

Oh yeah and just FTR, Brad Gillis didn't use the locking nut version but relied on precision design, case hardening, low friction nut and proper installation, much like the PRS system.. To my way of thinking the only value in a locking nut is on guitars that design the headstock for radical appearance rather than having form follow function.
Old 1 week ago
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post
Unless Night Ranger warbles are a big part of your sound I don't understand the desire for a Floyd Rose on a PRS. To me it is such a joy to not have to worry about an allan wrench if a string breaks. I like being able to adjust tuning while playing instead of having to have a few minutes "fiddling" when I should be git fiddling. I don't want to have to have a 2nd guitar on the ready or a handy roadie. In all seriousness, what is there, these days, that a Floyd offers that a PRS whammy doesn't.

Oh yeah and just FTR, Brad Gillis didn't use the locking nut version but relied on precision design, case hardening, low friction nut and proper installation, much like the PRS system.. To my way of thinking the only value in a locking nut is on guitars that design the headstock for radical appearance rather than having form follow function.
I like the guitar to remain perfectly in tune no matter what I do. Non-locking systems won't do that for me. I've played Fenders and PRSi that people have said the vibrato was perfectly set up, and it didn't return to perfect tuning the way the Floyd does. They said, "Well, you shouldn't move the bar that far!" Or, "Just flick the bar up, and it'll be back in tune." But I do get a bit crazy with it sometimes, and with a Floyd I never have to worry. It just works. Well. And I don't adjust tuning; no drop D, or any of that stuff. It is such a joy not to have to worry about tuning.
Old 1 week ago
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Scott View Post
Many USA built Gibsons are nothing to write home about, really. The PRS (even a Korean one) will be a flawless instrument.
Well, "flawless" is often in the eye of the beholder.

Or to put it another way, sometimes there's such a thing as "too flawless", as least to some people. I personally don't much care for PRS guitars in general because they're so "perfect" that to me they lack character. However I know lots of people who don't feel that way. (I also feel that much of the playing of many of those people also lacks character although they're generally pretty accomplished technically, and I don't mean in a "shredder" sort of way because some of them are but some definitely aren't.

You've really got to get your ass off the couch and go out and play some guitars, find the one that speaks to you.
Old 1 week ago
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Well, "flawless" is often in the eye of the beholder.

Or to put it another way, sometimes there's such a thing as "too flawless", as least to some people. I personally don't much care for PRS guitars in general because they're so "perfect" that to me they lack character. However I know lots of people who don't feel that way. (I also feel that much of the playing of many of those people also lacks character although they're generally pretty accomplished technically, and I don't mean in a "shredder" sort of way because some of them are but some definitely aren't.

You've really got to get your ass off the couch and go out and play some guitars, find the one that speaks to you.

The PRS may lack a bit of "character", compared to other brands, but i still think they look great. And from what i've heard, they sound great too. At least to my ear.

The problem, as I have said before, with going out and playing these guitars are that noen of my local guitar shops have them in stock. They have a handfull of gibson and fenders. And thats about it.
They do have Les Pauls in stock but not the tribute that i am looking at.
Old 1 week ago
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
You've really got to get your ass off the couch and go out and play some guitars, find the one that speaks to you.
I've played a whole lotta guitars in the past 46 years and decided that, for me, I much prefer acoustic guitars over electrics. I had a really great looking, feeling, and sounding 2012 PRS Custom 24 that I recently sold when I came to the above epiphany. I sold my last guitar amp, too, a Swart STR-Tremolo. when I sold the PRS (I've owned a few very desirable amps, too, over the years). Beyond al the usual "standard" electric guitars I have played over the years (Strats, Teles, LPs, various ES models, etc.), I have owned two 1978 Gibson RD Artists, 2000 Carvin SC90, 1961 Gretsch Double Anniversary, the aforementioned PRS, and several Rickenbackers - 2003 660/12, 1998 360V63, 2007 660 75th Anniversary, and a 1967 330.

Nowadays, I play my Martin, Taylor, and Yamamoto acoustics.
Old 1 week ago
  #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLoyd1021 View Post
The problem, as I have said before, with going out and playing these guitars are that noen of my local guitar shops have them in stock.
If you have not decided yet (and it does sound as if you may have...) could you order both online and send one of them back?

As most posters here have said, you won't hate it, whichever one you buy, but will you ever love-the-one-you're-with if you don't play them both?
Old 1 week ago
  #18
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by grannis View Post
If you have not decided yet (and it does sound as if you may have...) could you order both online and send one of them back?

As most posters here have said, you won't hate it, whichever one you buy, but will you ever love-the-one-you're-with if you don't play them both?
Yeah, i could do that, but the problem is i don't have the money to buy two guitars at the same time.

A new thing that i discovered with these two guitars that kinda got me on the fence is, i think they both have like a glossy lacquered neck. Don't know about that. I have never played much on a guitar that had that kind of lacquered neck before, and i hear it can get sticky when you play.
Don't know if its a big problem or not. Guess not since they still make guitars with necks like that.
Old 1 week ago
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLoyd1021 View Post
The PRS may lack a bit of "character", compared to other brands, but i still think they look great. And from what i've heard, they sound great too. At least to my ear.

The problem, as I have said before, with going out and playing these guitars are that noen of my local guitar shops have them in stock. They have a handfull of gibson and fenders. And thats about it.
They do have Les Pauls in stock but not the tribute that i am looking at.
Well,you don't identify where you're located, so it's difficult to be any more specific but my advice at this point is that it's probably time to plan and arrange a daytrip to the nearest larger city that does have some music shops that have a more extensive of guitars closer to what you're looking for. Asking strangers on the the internet to help you choose between two different models of guitar to to be ordered sight unseen is no way to choose an expensive guitar.You need to go out and play a selection of each model and similar guitars and make a choice based on you personal reaction. No other person can really do that for you. It's like asking a bunch of random strangers to select your wife.

There IS more consistency between PRS guitars on the whole and they are very pretty guitars if you like that sort of thing (many do, many don't) but you still can't tell if that's really the guitar for you. Remember, you don't play the finish or styling. You have to go out in the world and decide for yourself. On the whole I don't really care all that much for most of the new Gibsons from the last several years, either, so I really have no dog in this fight - but I doubt that anybody else is more qualified to make such a decision for someone else, either.

If it was, I seriously doubt that I'd be buying a guitar new, anyway. As soon as you take possession it loses a big chunk of value and in nearly every case I like older guitars, anyway.

Good luck!
Some things you really do have to do for yourself.
Old 1 week ago
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Scott View Post
I've played a whole lotta guitars in the past 46 years and decided that, for me, I much prefer acoustic guitars over electrics. I had a really great looking, feeling, and sounding 2012 PRS Custom 24 that I recently sold when I came to the above epiphany. I sold my last guitar amp, too, a Swart STR-Tremolo. when I sold the PRS (I've owned a few very desirable amps, too, over the years). Beyond al the usual "standard" electric guitars I have played over the years (Strats, Teles, LPs, various ES models, etc.), I have owned two 1978 Gibson RD Artists, 2000 Carvin SC90, 1961 Gretsch Double Anniversary, the aforementioned PRS, and several Rickenbackers - 2003 660/12, 1998 360V63, 2007 660 75th Anniversary, and a 1967 330.

Nowadays, I play my Martin, Taylor, and Yamamoto acoustics.
Well that's nice I guess, and these days I play my J-200 maybe 80% of the time, My Guild D-40 maybe 15% of the time, and all my electrics the remainder. But what you or I may currently like really doesn't have anything at all to do with "helping" the OP choose a new electric guitar, does it?
Old 1 week ago
  #21
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I was an SG player - I have 3 - but now the guitar that gets the work is a PRS S2 standard 22 in satin. I like the 25in scale, 10in radius, and the satin smooth neck.
I changed out the bridge for a Mann brass bridge and saddles, put better pots in and custom wound a bridge pup to my specs. Its my fav guitar and many of the local cork sniffers are blown away by its sound.

if you can swing the price get an S2 - USA made. the 2017s have the 85/15 pups which are decent.
Old 1 week ago
  #22
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enorbet2's Avatar
While I agree with John Eppstein on quite a few fronts, I truly don't understand his aversion to PRS guitars. Gibson's may need no introduction but they do need research as QC has varied quite a lot over the years. Possibly a PRS introduction may be in order.

I grew up knowing Paul Smith's brother, Jimmy, who grew into a fine musician that I did some amp and guitar work for. In fact I sold him a guitar build kit in 1971, which he never got around to building but Paul did. I met Paul Smith later when he first opened his shop in Annapolis. He had just left his guitar tech position at Chuck Levin's Washington Music Center but still played in a reasonably successful R 'n R band that toured all over Maryland with some truly superb bandmates. I visited the Annapolis factory many times including several of the company parties that featured all the bands of his employees and other local musician friends in massive jam sessions. the first part of this is to inform you, if you didn't already know, that Paul is a fine musician who dearly loves guitars, music and musicians.

He also has a calculating and creative mind for figuring out how to do things properly. He basically invented a custom machine that cuts all 24 fret slots at once with a tolerance of one-ten-thousandth of an inch. His truss rod assembly is absolutely superb. He designed the headstock specifically to have the string path absolutely straight from bridge to machine head for excellent tuning characteristics - little or no binding. There's a lot more i could say but this isn't meant to be an advertisement, just a note hat these guitars come from a rare combination of musician and tech. Not many manufacturers can boast of such a tight relationship with their product.

The point is that there are so few flaws from a player's or technician's POV that maybe this is why John thinks they "lack character". They are sort of transparent. You provide the character. They just don't get in your way. In fact they are completely amenable to custom changes if you don't like Paul's bias which is he hates random capacitor filtering on guitar signal which translates into his guitars sounding bright to most people. Considering most controls are cut controls and it is easier to get rid of stuff than to add it if it isn't there, that shouldn't be a big deal.

You can call the factory and discuss any personal changes you might want. For example I know a guy who didn't like the switchable phasey distributed capacitance chip and just wanted a normal legacy tone control. It was done with zero additional cost.

Bottom line is they look great, sound great and especially play great. I'm not at all saying you should choose the PRS over the Les Paul, just that both truly are great choices and you really can't go wrong. It would be terrific if you could try a few but even if you just go on a whim with your gut, you really won't be unhappy..
Old 1 week ago
  #23
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Well,you don't identify where you're located, so it's difficult to be any more specific but my advice at this point is that it's probably time to plan and arrange a daytrip to the nearest larger city that does have some music shops that have a more extensive of guitars closer to what you're looking for. Asking strangers on the the internet to help you choose between two different models of guitar to to be ordered sight unseen is no way to choose an expensive guitar.You need to go out and play a selection of each model and similar guitars and make a choice based on you personal reaction. No other person can really do that for you. It's like asking a bunch of random strangers to select your wife.

There IS more consistency between PRS guitars on the whole and they are very pretty guitars if you like that sort of thing (many do, many don't) but you still can't tell if that's really the guitar for you. Remember, you don't play the finish or styling. You have to go out in the world and decide for yourself. On the whole I don't really care all that much for most of the new Gibsons from the last several years, either, so I really have no dog in this fight - but I doubt that anybody else is more qualified to make such a decision for someone else, either.

If it was, I seriously doubt that I'd be buying a guitar new, anyway. As soon as you take possession it loses a big chunk of value and in nearly every case I like older guitars, anyway.

Good luck!
Some things you really do have to do for yourself.

It's not that i dont agree with you that the best option is to try the guitar to see if it's right for you, but a day trip is not really possible for me. It is about 8 hours drive, one way, to the nearest shop that sell these guitars on their webshop.
I will just have to order it online, try it out, and send it back if i don't like it.

I have been looking on the used market, but not anything interessting there.

I don't live in the US, and the used guitar market in my country is not the same as in the US.'

Thanks for your advice.
Old 1 week ago
  #24
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post
While I agree with John Eppstein on quite a few fronts, I truly don't understand his aversion to PRS guitars. Gibson's may need no introduction but they do need research as QC has varied quite a lot over the years. Possibly a PRS introduction may be in order.

I grew up knowing Paul Smith's brother, Jimmy, who grew into a fine musician that I did some amp and guitar work for. In fact I sold him a guitar build kit in 1971, which he never got around to building but Paul did. I met Paul Smith later when he first opened his shop in Annapolis. He had just left his guitar tech position at Chuck Levin's Washington Music Center but still played in a reasonably successful R 'n R band that toured all over Maryland with some truly superb bandmates. I visited the Annapolis factory many times including several of the company parties that featured all the bands of his employees and other local musician friends in massive jam sessions. the first part of this is to inform you, if you didn't already know, that Paul is a fine musician who dearly loves guitars, music and musicians.

He also has a calculating and creative mind for figuring out how to do things properly. He basically invented a custom machine that cuts all 24 fret slots at once with a tolerance of one-ten-thousandth of an inch. His truss rod assembly is absolutely superb. He designed the headstock specifically to have the string path absolutely straight from bridge to machine head for excellent tuning characteristics - little or no binding. There's a lot more i could say but this isn't meant to be an advertisement, just a note hat these guitars come from a rare combination of musician and tech. Not many manufacturers can boast of such a tight relationship with their product.

The point is that there are so few flaws from a player's or technician's POV that maybe this is why John thinks they "lack character". They are sort of transparent. You provide the character. They just don't get in your way. In fact they are completely amenable to custom changes if you don't like Paul's bias which is he hates random capacitor filtering on guitar signal which translates into his guitars sounding bright to most people. Considering most controls are cut controls and it is easier to get rid of stuff than to add it if it isn't there, that shouldn't be a big deal.

You can call the factory and discuss any personal changes you might want. For example I know a guy who didn't like the switchable phasey distributed capacitance chip and just wanted a normal legacy tone control. It was done with zero additional cost.

Bottom line is they look great, sound great and especially play great. I'm not at all saying you should choose the PRS over the Les Paul, just that both truly are great choices and you really can't go wrong. It would be terrific if you could try a few but even if you just go on a whim with your gut, you really won't be unhappy..

Thank you for the info, but from what i can understand, this is all for the US made PRS guitars. The PRS SE are made in Korea i think.
Old 1 week ago
  #25
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enorbet2's Avatar
C

Quote:
Originally Posted by FLoyd1021 View Post
Thank you for the info, but from what i can understand, this is all for the US made PRS guitars. The PRS SE are made in Korea i think.
They are but they evolved from Paul's experience and time tested designs and he demands tight QC and final say over the manufacture. The Koreans are quite obliging to do as he bids since it is an extremely lucrative contract.

Things aren't good just because they are new or old BUT newer designers do have the advantage of not making old mistakes in order to learn from them. It was only because Les Paul himself was such a mix of musician and tech that he got so many things right so long ago. Paul has that quality plus the advantage of standing on both Les and Leo's shoulders but not the disadvantage of some Johhny Come Latelys who aren't players or techs, let alone both, and who build fad guitars. .
Old 1 week ago
  #26
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLoyd1021 View Post
It's not that i dont agree with you that the best option is to try the guitar to see if it's right for you, but a day trip is not really possible for me. It is about 8 hours drive, one way, to the nearest shop that sell these guitars on their webshop.
I will just have to order it online, try it out, and send it back if i don't like it.

I have been looking on the used market, but not anything interessting there.

I don't live in the US, and the used guitar market in my country is not the same as in the US.'

Thanks for your advice.
Well, in that case my heart goes out to you. I've recently suffered a somewhat lesser version of same problem, when a year go I was forced relocate about 60 miles north of San Francisco, which works out about an 1.5 - 2 hour drive, depending on traffic conditions and parking, which is doable but certainly puts a big crimp in things, especially compared to my former situation where I could hop a bus and be at Guitar Center in 10 minutes. Half an hour to my Pro Audio dealer of the vintage guitar shop downtown where the best guitar tech in the Bay Area also has his shop.. The music shops I've found in my immediate area range from "kinda meh" to "really sucky".

Bleh!

Still, I make the drive when I have to and try to time it to avoid the traffic - which is hard for both directions in one trip.
Old 1 week ago
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet2 View Post
Things aren't good just because they are new or old BUT newer designers do have the advantage of not making old mistakes in order to learn from them.
Which is not to say that they don't anyway, as well as inventing new ones, such as an over-reliance on technology to the detriment of craft. Or coming up with "bright ideas" that really aren't. Or inventing "solutions" for non-problems. A good example (IMO) of one of those "bright ideas" was the PRS "intermediate scale" neck that was neither Fender nor Gibson but managed to have all the disadvantages of both and none of the desirable characteristics.... I notice PRS is now making some models with a Gibson scale.....
Old 1 week ago
  #28
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Thread Starter
A little update if anyone is interrested.

I am now 99.9% sure i'm gonna order the PRS SE Custom 24 in Whale Blue.

The reason for me picking this guitar over the LP are that it seems to be a bit more versatile sounding. The Les Paul i think is very specific sounding. Don't know if thats the right word for it. Not that that is a negative thing towards the LP. I do really like the sound of a LP.
From what people have responded in this thread, it seems that the PRS guitars are very well made. Some even said they where "to perfect".
Even though the LP have a very classic look i do like the look of the PRS and the fact that you get a flame top on the guitar. Even if i think it's just a thin veneer? on top of a regular maple top.

The cons for me on the PRS are the lacquered neck, which i'm not sure if i'll like or not.
But i also think the LP have this kind of neck so this would be a problem anyway.

i will just have to order it and test it out. If I don't like it, I always have the option to return it.
Old 1 week ago
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
But what you or I may currently like really doesn't have anything at all to do with "helping" the OP choose a new electric guitar, does it?
I already gave him my feeling on the subject in a previous post. I'll reiterate for the OP's benefit: PRS is my opinion over any modern Gibson.

Hope this helps.
Old 6 days ago
  #30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Scott View Post
I already gave him my feeling on the subject in a previous post. I'll reiterate for the OP's benefit: PRS is my opinion over any modern Gibson.

Hope this helps.
And mine is to not waste money on a new guitar.

Hope that helps too, but he probably won't listen.

EDIT: Aren't the PRS SE series made in Korea?
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