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Anyone interested in custom Tweed style amps?
Old 2nd February 2017
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Anyone interested in custom Tweed style amps?

I've been doing DIY audio gear for a while, also I'm pretty good at woodworking and I have my own workshop.

I was thinking about selling some of my work online.
I'm talking about custom point-to-point wired Tweed amps (Champ, Princeton, 5e3, Bassman) and/or Tweed speaker cabs.

Here is a Tweed Champ I made (including the solid pine cab and hand stitched real leather handle).




I'm working on a 5e3 Deluxe (head and combo) in the same style right now, with high gain channel. Also a headshell for the Champ.

I was wondering what you think about it. Because it would be only worth my while, if I can sell at least couple of amps each month. Do you find it interesting or do you think the market doesn't need more tweed clones? (my intention is not only make 'standard' tweeds, but also custom ones).
So far I've been doing some promotion on the web, a lot of people seem to be interested, but I managed to sell only 1 Champ The buyer was really happy with it though.

Last edited by Anthon; 2nd February 2017 at 03:18 AM..
Old 2nd February 2017
  #2
Deleted 691ca21
Guest
They look (and I'm sure sound) great, but it is a flooded market. Don't let that stop you though!
Old 2nd February 2017
  #3
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Not trying to knock you down, but I agree that this market seems really saturated.


I've always thought if someone wanted to clone anything, they should clone my old "Fenler" (not a typo) Bassman head...measure its current decayed component values, its wonky mismatched tubes...make a point to point remake (it already is P2P), then you'd have a hit.
Old 2nd February 2017
  #4
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Shouldn't this go in some sort of Spam section?
Old 2nd February 2017
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deleted 691ca21 View Post
They look (and I'm sure sound) great, but it is a flooded market. Don't let that stop you though!
Thanks, it does sound very nice.
I've made a champ head and a 12 inch cab with a Jensen p12r for myself, and it works great for me. I don't even feel like using fx pedals. Great tone with a single knob. Less is more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kslight View Post
Not trying to knock you down, but I agree that this market seems really saturated.

I've always thought if someone wanted to clone anything, they should clone my old "Fenler" (not a typo) Bassman head...measure its current decayed component values, its wonky mismatched tubes...make a point to point remake (it already is P2P), then you'd have a hit.
Yes, guitar amp market is saturated, but what isn't these days? Does this mean not a single guitar amp is getting sold?
I think it's all about standing out - because most of the clones I see on the web are rather boring. You'll see what I'm talking about once I show the other amps I've been working on (I hope )

Even without component matching making a good p2p clone is a lot of work. But trying to replicate a particular amp with all its wonkyness is a complete non-starter.


Quote:
Originally Posted by noah330 View Post
Shouldn't this go in some sort of Spam section?
Are you talking about your comment?
Old 2nd February 2017
  #6
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No, I'm not selling anything.
Old 2nd February 2017
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noah330 View Post
No, I'm not selling anything.
Am I? I was just asking if people are interested in custom amps in general, and share my work. It's more like market research.

If I would want to sell something, I would specify the prices, location, warranty etc.
Also, I wouldn't have told I sold only 1 amp so far, because that's just bad marketing.
Old 2nd February 2017
  #8
certainly not spam as defined by its common usage: How the Word “Spam” Came to Mean “Junk Message”

I'd buy one if the price was right... Best bet I think would be to start a "store" on both Reverb and Etsy.

Edit: I'd also want a non-leather handle option but I'm certainly not your average consumer. (I don't buy or wear any leather.)
Old 2nd February 2017
  #9
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Don't make clones - there are already established names out there that do that, and any clone buyer is going to go for those names rather than some newb who has no internet credit to his name.

So, the following advice will only cost you 10% of your companies stock (i'll collect once you have conquered the world with your amps and incorporated):
Use the circuits from those old fenders, but put them in high tech looking enclosures and call the amps retro-futuristic and price them far lower than your average clone.

That way you can sell good sounding (and cool looking) amps to lots of people (rather than to a few snobs) and on top of that avoid the typical internet complaints of "it doesn't sound like the originals" (the kind of people who like to complain about this will not and cannot be stopped from doing so, no matter how good your amp might be) because you are no longer trying to live up to an unattainable goal.

Much easier than cloning something that no one will accept as being like "the real thing" anyway... :D
Old 2nd February 2017
  #10
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by grumphh View Post
Don't make clones - there are already established names out there that do that, and any clone buyer is going to go for those names rather than some newb who has no internet credit to his name.

So, the following advice will only cost you 10% of your companies stock (i'll collect once you have conquered the world with your amps and incorporated):
Use the circuits from those old fenders, but put them in high tech looking enclosures and call the amps retro-futuristic and price them far lower than your average clone.

That way you can sell good sounding (and cool looking) amps to lots of people (rather than to a few snobs) and on top of that avoid the typical internet complaints of "it doesn't sound like the originals" (the kind of people who like to complain about this will not and cannot be stopped from doing so, no matter how good your amp might be) because you are no longer trying to live up to an unattainable goal.

Much easier than cloning something that no one will accept as being like "the real thing" anyway... :D
That IS a good advice

I don't see what I do as a 'cloning' per se... if somebody would ask me - "do they sound like a vintage Fender", I would probably recommend them buying a vintage Fender.

I just think they look and sound nice on their own, and are built to last. But I get why some people might expect 100% vintage sound.
Now you are mentioning it, it would be easier to use aluminum enclosures instead of steel ones, with my own layout (these tweed layouts are pain in the *ss imho). I make my own cabs, so I can make them look like I want. Also I could mod circuits a bit for more flexibility. I would not feel obligated to price them as high - I can make them for a very reasonable price (if I can make couple of changes). I think a lot of snobs are put off by the low priced tweed clone

I'll certainly give it a shot.
But I already invested in building some 'clones', so I'll stick with it for now. Besides - you learn a lot by replicating existing designs.
Old 2nd February 2017
  #11
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ellekei View Post
certainly not spam as defined by its common usage: How the Word “Spam” Came to Mean “Junk Message”

I'd buy one if the price was right... Best bet I think would be to start a "store" on both Reverb and Etsy.

Edit: I'd also want a non-leather handle option but I'm certainly not your average consumer. (I don't buy or wear any leather.)
I'll let you know, when I have finished some stuff I'm working on right now. What would you be interested in?
Sure, non leather handle would be even easier for me.
Old 3rd February 2017
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthon View Post
That IS a good advice

I don't see what I do as a 'cloning' per se... if somebody would ask me - "do they sound like a vintage Fender", I would probably recommend them buying a vintage Fender.

I just think they look and sound nice on their own, and are built to last. But I get why some people might expect 100% vintage sound.
Now you are mentioning it, it would be easier to use aluminum enclosures instead of steel ones, with my own layout (these tweed layouts are pain in the *ss imho). I make my own cabs, so I can make them look like I want. Also I could mod circuits a bit for more flexibility. I would not feel obligated to price them as high - I can make them for a very reasonable price (if I can make couple of changes). I think a lot of snobs are put off by the low priced tweed clone

I'll certainly give it a shot.
But I already invested in building some 'clones', so I'll stick with it for now. Besides - you learn a lot by replicating existing designs.
Well, even if you put bog standard fender circuits amps in a different shell, if you keep the circuit like the old ones they should still be able to provide that special sound.
...and if they are affordable and reasonably modern looking*, maybe younger players than the typical middle aged clone buyer get the appeal of that sound - precisely because it is not looking like it imitates something old and "old fashioned", but because it is good in itself - and they don't need to know that those are the same amps inside that their grandpas already made music with, back in the dark ages...

...it's a bit like cheating the customer into buying a better amp than they actually think they buy


...ok, maybe i should not dish out business advice, but i am certain that getting into the "retro" amp market is a pretty difficult task.


* Under no circumstance should the single tone knob be labeled "tone".
"Tone" is for lawyers and doctors with Suhrs or Collings electrics.
The single tone knob should be huge, have a cartoonish graphic of a skull and crossbones and be labeled "facemelt" on the bright side and "deadly relaxed" on the mellow side...
...or something along those lines (i'm to old to be hip anymore, so do market research with younger people) , just avoid mentioning "tone" as that is not what a new generation (any generation) of rebellious youth wants to own.
Obnoxious is always better than your parents concepts of tone.
Old 3rd February 2017
  #13
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by grumphh View Post
Well, even if you put bog standard fender circuits amps in a different shell, if you keep the circuit like the old ones they should still be able to provide that special sound.
...and if they are affordable and reasonably modern looking*, maybe younger players than the typical middle aged clone buyer get the appeal of that sound - precisely because it is not looking like it imitates something old and "old fashioned", but because it is good in itself - and they don't need to know that those are the same amps inside that their grandpas already made music with, back in the dark ages...

...it's a bit like cheating the customer into buying a better amp than they actually think they buy


...ok, maybe i should not dish out business advice, but i am certain that getting into the "retro" amp market is a pretty difficult task.


* Under no circumstance should the single tone knob be labeled "tone".
"Tone" is for lawyers and doctors with Suhrs or Collings electrics.
The single tone knob should be huge, have a cartoonish graphic of a skull and crossbones and be labeled "facemelt" on the bright side and "deadly relaxed" on the mellow side...
...or something along those lines (i'm to old to be hip anymore, so do market research with younger people) , just avoid mentioning "tone" as that is not what a new generation (any generation) of rebellious youth wants to own.
Obnoxious is always better than your parents concepts of tone.
Okay, getting waaay ahead of ourselves here, but let's entertain the idea while we at it.

These old circuits do sound old (timeless?).... it's not 'facemelting' kind of sound.

And as far as I know, younger people will buy the cheapest digital thing they can find, as long as it has 999+ effects, 526 band graphic EQ and you can switch sounds with a pedal. I know that's what I did, when I was a teenager now here I am, loving an amp with 1 volume knob and not even using any pedals

Does it even makes sense, trying to appeal to younger guitar players?
I mean, it sure does from a business standpoint.... but what I want to do, is to build amps I like, occasionally sell one or two to further invest in my DIY.
Youngsters wouldn't even be able to afford it, if it's all tube, p2p handwired, and made in small quantities. Just the 2 good quality transformers (power and output) for a 5e3 cost about 120 euro - you could buy a digital solid state combo amp for that amount of money. You can't compete with that, if you want to build a good amp.


Btw, I'm 29 years old.
Old 3rd February 2017
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthon View Post
I'll let you know, when I have finished some stuff I'm working on right now. What would you be interested in?
Sure, non leather handle would be even easier for me.
The two Fender-style amps that interest me most are the Princeton and the Bassman.
Old 3rd February 2017
  #15
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grumphh's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthon View Post
Okay, getting waaay ahead of ourselves here, but let's entertain the idea while we at it.


Quote:
These old circuits do sound old (timeless?).... it's not 'facemelting' kind of sound.
They can get obnoxious though at full tilt - at least some of the circuits, that should be enough to justify a little hyperbole. (and put that 70$ Zoom in front of them and well, they will melt faces...)
And any person under 30 these days should be expected to be able to cope with a little irony built into products.

Also, yes, the majority of young people have always bought cheap stuff simply because most don't have the funds to buy expensive stuff - however, those who do take their music seriously have thoughout times also invested into good sounding gear, and those are the ones i probably would try to reach if i were to start a small amp business. (Which i in no way am going to do).

I assume there is a market of people who play "alternative guitar based music", who would love "retro/future concept amps" the problem is reaching that market - but i'd still imagine that it is an easier market to reach for a newcomer than trying to pry thousands of dollars for a single amp from a selfproclaimed tonehound lawyers hands.

...should you be able to gain a little recognition first by catering to regular musicians, then you can always make that high end line of fantastic (and nosebleedingly expensive) amps - but people who buy these "fantastic tone machines" are not going to buy expensive amps from you if you have no reputation to your name...
Old 3rd February 2017
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthon View Post
Now you are mentioning it, it would be easier to use aluminum enclosures instead of steel ones, with my own layout (these tweed layouts are pain in the *ss imho).
You absolutely DO NOT want to use your own layout. It's not obvious to people who are not experienced amp techs, but layout is absolutely critical to good performance in audio circuitry, especially in tube amplifiers. In some cases the layout may actually take longer to get right than the circuit.

An example: When I worked for Don Wehr's Music City back in the day Don asked me to take a look at an amp that he'd had on the floor for several years and was unable to sell. It was a "100 watt" tube head from a short lived company called Plush, 4 6L6 tubes in a head cab that was tuck and roll tolex, like an old Kustom. Plugged it in, it made sound but it wasn't very loud for 4 6L6s and it really didn't sound very good. Put it on the bench and the picture on the scope revealed that it had a very distorted (in a very nasty way) waveform with parasitic ultrasonic oscillation s hanging off the waveform. Opened it up and guess what I found?

It was a Fender Twin Reverb clone, exact electronic copy of a AB763 circuit, built with all genuine Fender parts. What was NOT an exact copy of a Twin Reverb was......................................... yup, the layout. The monkey who built the thing used his own layout, based on what he thought was easiest for him to throw together. The result was an amp that only put out about half the power of the original and sounded like utter crap. The problem is that if certain lines run too close to certain parts of the amp, or certain components are too close together, or certain conductors cross at the wrong angle you get inductive and/or magnetic coupling between parts of the circuit that result in oscillations.

The only possible cure for that amp would have been if I'd stripped it down to individual components, built a new circuit board with correct layout, and rebuilt the amp from the ground up. Don didn't want to pay for the amount of labor involved, so the amp went down to the basement and stayed there until the store closed, some years later.

What's doubly ironic is that Leo Fender's layouts are actually some of the easiest to work on of any production amps ever made...
Old 3rd February 2017
  #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthon View Post
Okay, getting waaay ahead of ourselves here, but let's entertain the idea while we at it.

These old circuits do sound old (timeless?).... it's not 'facemelting' kind of sound.

And as far as I know, younger people will buy the cheapest digital thing they can find, as long as it has 999+ effects, 526 band graphic EQ and you can switch sounds with a pedal. I know that's what I did, when I was a teenager now here I am, loving an amp with 1 volume knob and not even using any pedals

Does it even makes sense, trying to appeal to younger guitar players?
I mean, it sure does from a business standpoint.... but what I want to do, is to build amps I like, occasionally sell one or two to further invest in my DIY.
Youngsters wouldn't even be able to afford it, if it's all tube, p2p handwired, and made in small quantities. Just the 2 good quality transformers (power and output) for a 5e3 cost about 120 euro - you could buy a digital solid state combo amp for that amount of money. You can't compete with that, if you want to build a good amp.


Btw, I'm 29 years old.
You're absolutely correct, the kids (at least those in the mass market) want cheap junk with lots of bells and whistles to give them "choices" to play with for the lowest possible expenditure per gizmo (free is good) so they have plenty of stuff to play with because actually playing guitar is HARD.
Old 3rd February 2017
  #18
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
You absolutely DO NOT want to use your own layout. It's not obvious to people who are not experienced amp techs, but layout is absolutely critical to good performance in audio circuitry, especially in tube amplifiers. In some cases the layout may actually take longer to get right than the circuit.

An example: When I worked for Don Wehr's Music City back in the day Don asked me to take a look at an amp that he'd had on the floor for several years and was unable to sell. It was a "100 watt" tube head from a short lived company called Plush, 4 6L6 tubes in a head cab that was tuck and roll tolex, like an old Kustom. Plugged it in, it made sound but it wasn't very loud for 4 6L6s and it really didn't sound very good. Put it on the bench and the picture on the scope revealed that it had a very distorted (in a very nasty way) waveform with parasitic ultrasonic oscillation s hanging off the waveform. Opened it up and guess what I found?

It was a Fender Twin Reverb clone, exact electronic copy of a AB763 circuit, built with all genuine Fender parts. What was NOT an exact copy of a Twin Reverb was......................................... yup, the layout. The monkey who built the thing used his own layout, based on what he thought was easiest for him to throw together. The result was an amp that only put out about half the power of the original and sounded like utter crap. The problem is that if certain lines run too close to certain parts of the amp, or certain components are too close together, or certain conductors cross at the wrong angle you get inductive and/or magnetic coupling between parts of the circuit that result in oscillations.

The only possible cure for that amp would have been if I'd stripped it down to individual components, built a new circuit board with correct layout, and rebuilt the amp from the ground up. Don didn't want to pay for the amount of labor involved, so the amp went down to the basement and stayed there until the store closed, some years later.

What's doubly ironic is that Leo Fender's layouts are actually some of the easiest to work on of any production amps ever made...
I would keep the eyelet board layout and how tubes and transformers are layed out, but place everything in a different kind of chassis, so it would be easier to assemble.
Sure, tweed layouts are pretty straightforward, but the chassis is not really practical for a headshell. And sometimes I feel like someone who assembles miniature ships inside bottles.
Old 3rd February 2017
  #19
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ellekei View Post
The two Fender-style amps that interest me most are the Princeton and the Bassman.
Tweed Princeton is not a problem.

I do want to build a Bassman, but first I would need to sell couple of amps to invest in parts to build a working prototype. I will probably build a Bassman cab and headshell before I even begin thinking about electronics. I like building cabs


Head or combo? Combo would be rather expensive to build, because it needs 4x 10 inch Jensen speakers, which aren't cheap. Just talking about part costs, for me it doesn't matter much. Building a combo cab is not much harder than building a headshell in the same style, if you have the right tools (and I do).
Old 3rd February 2017
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthon View Post
Tweed Princeton is not a problem.

I do want to build a Bassman, but first I would need to sell couple of amps to invest in parts to build a working prototype. I will probably build a Bassman cab and headshell before I even begin thinking about electronics. I like building cabs


Head or combo? Combo would be rather expensive to build, because it needs 4x 10 inch Jensen speakers, which aren't cheap. Just talking about part costs, for me it doesn't matter much. Building a combo cab is not much harder than building a headshell in the same style, if you have the right tools (and I do).
I'd be more interested in the Princeton, considering its smaller and easier to ship - for a large amp like a Bassman I would probably want to deal with a local builder who has a verifiable history of quality amps. But, I was doing some searches on modified Bassman heads yesterday and found a page with people putting their Bassman heads into a 1x12 combo - maybe an idea...
Old 3rd February 2017
  #21
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kafka's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthon View Post
Tweed Princeton is not a problem.

I do want to build a Bassman, but first I would need to sell couple of amps to invest in parts to build a working prototype. I will probably build a Bassman cab and headshell before I even begin thinking about electronics. I like building cabs


Head or combo? Combo would be rather expensive to build, because it needs 4x 10 inch Jensen speakers, which aren't cheap. Just talking about part costs, for me it doesn't matter much. Building a combo cab is not much harder than building a headshell in the same style, if you have the right tools (and I do).
Someone who makes head versions of everything would have a leg up, in my book. I already have plenty of cabs, and I don't have space for more. However, I could easily find space for a tweed Champ, Princeton, Bassman, Twin, Deluxe, etc, head or two.
Old 3rd February 2017
  #22
Bassman heads, modified to resemble early JTM-45s could be an option. I have been tinkering with the idea of building one for myself.
Old 3rd February 2017
  #23
Price is going to be king.

What I want in a princeton is A. tube trem and B. Spring reverb.

If you're building one that does those things, lmk. I may be in the market for a princeton and I keep eyeballing the 68 custom.
Old 3rd February 2017
  #24
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ellekei View Post
I'd be more interested in the Princeton, considering its smaller and easier to ship - for a large amp like a Bassman I would probably want to deal with a local builder who has a verifiable history of quality amps. But, I was doing some searches on modified Bassman heads yesterday and found a page with people putting their Bassman heads into a 1x12 combo - maybe an idea...
Princeton I could do just fine, but I wouldn't feel comfortable building Bassman for someone else at this point. I would have to build one for myself first, and see if it's any good.
But at some point in the future I could put a Bassman chassis in a Deluxe style 12 inch combo (or in a headshell). Or I could just make a Bassman, without any cab or headshell.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kafka View Post
Someone who makes head versions of everything would have a leg up, in my book. I already have plenty of cabs, and I don't have space for more. However, I could easily find space for a tweed Champ, Princeton, Bassman, Twin, Deluxe, etc, head or two.
That's what I thought also. I see a lot of 'standard' clones, but few head versions or other custom stuff.
I'm building clones for the portfolio mostly.
I also prefer cab + head setup (that's what I've built for myself).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mordae View Post
Bassman heads, modified to resemble early JTM-45s could be an option. I have been tinkering with the idea of building one for myself.
As far as I know, JTM-45 schematic is very similar to the Bassman.
But why not build a JTM-45 head instead?

Quote:
Originally Posted by donsolo View Post
Price is going to be king.

What I want in a princeton is A. tube trem and B. Spring reverb.

If you're building one that does those things, lmk. I may be in the market for a princeton and I keep eyeballing the 68 custom.
If you want tremolo and spring reverb you'll need extra tubes and transformers. Also a completely custom metal chassis for the amp.
This would be a quite heavy mod. It would be too much work for 1 time thing.

What I can do atm is making custom cabs and headshells, and some minor mods (like high gain channel for 5e3).
Old 3rd February 2017
  #25
+1 for both mordae and donsolo.

Also, any possibility of an effects loop?
Old 3rd February 2017
  #26
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Pindrive's Avatar
For the love of doing it, yes! Do it! It's a tough market, though. Best advice I have for anyone wanting to venture into the music market is to have your "way up" established. I've seen people doing great work, flounder(myself included). I've also seen people doing great work, with friends in the music industry who will pass their name around who, end up doing pretty well. It's flooded market, as mentioned. It takes as much passion as a business person, as it does as an artist & craftsman. It can take a lot of money to get anywhere & finding a way to build up to bigger shows.
Old 4th February 2017
  #27
Low cost tweed amp kits have been on the market for years.
Old 4th February 2017
  #28
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

If you want to fill a gap in the market, make a 1 X 12 cab with a removable back.
Old 4th February 2017
  #29
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kafka's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthon View Post
That's what I thought also. I see a lot of 'standard' clones, but few head versions or other custom stuff.
I'm building clones for the portfolio mostly.
I also prefer cab + head setup (that's what I've built for myself).
There was actually exactly one Fender tweed Bassman head/cab, with the controls on top, made back in the 50's. I forget where I saw it, maybe in one of the Guitar Amp Books. Cool as hell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
You absolutely DO NOT want to use your own layout. It's not obvious to people who are not experienced amp techs, but layout is absolutely critical to good performance in audio circuitry, especially in tube amplifiers. In some cases the layout may actually take longer to get right than the circuit.
John is spot on about this. The circuits are nothing. Leo Fender was taking them right from RCA's 'how to use a tube' manual. It's the layout that make all the difference in the world.

I read an interview with Howard Dumble where he mentioned this. He was asked if he could build his amp on someone else's chassis, and he said no, he'd have to strip it down, and fill and repunch all the holes.

Maybe you could come up with your own special thing, but I wouldn't make it look like a Fender Tweed if I did. If you have a new recipe that's actually good, you should try to make it distinctly your own.
Old 8th February 2017
  #30
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
Low cost tweed amp kits have been on the market for years.
It's a different kind of product. People interested in DIY will not buy an assembled unit, and people who are not interested in DIY will not buy a kit.
Besides, kits are not what I call low cost.

From what I've learned doing DIY, it almost always ends up being more expensive than buying a finished product, if you consider the time that has to be invested into research and building, different tools, etc.
There is economy of scale, so you can save money with DIY but only in the long run if you want to build a lot of stuff.
I do it because I love (building) gear - probably even more than actually using it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kafka View Post
John is spot on about this. The circuits are nothing...

Maybe you could come up with your own special thing, but I wouldn't make it look like a Fender Tweed if I did....
Surely, the circuits are something

If I would change layout and chassis, then it would be my own thing.
I'm not ready for that yet though, will stick with tweeds in custom cabs for now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kafka View Post
There was actually exactly one Fender tweed Bassman head/cab, with the controls on top, made back in the 50's. I forget where I saw it, maybe in one of the Guitar Amp Books. Cool as hell.
I could make a headshell for a bassman (or any other tweed combo), in the same style of the headshell I did for the champ (it would be 1.5x times wider).
I'm working on a 5e3 headshell right now.




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