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Old 7th June 2012
  #1612
Quote:
Originally Posted by drpeacock View Post
Yes. It is. But doing it very well isn't. I don't know many people who would argue with that. I find it to be self-evident, in fact.
Really?

Are you a drummer?

I'm not.

I've tried, I took drum lessons, I practiced, but guess what? Drumming is HARD! Even though I can bang out a mean beat of the top of the bar and even swing pretty damn well doing it, put me behind a kit and I SUCK. And I don't even do that very well.

For that matter, I can't even play the single snare drum worth crap. Drumming is HARD!

Quote:
Originally Posted by drpeacock View Post
Yes. It is. But doing it very well isn't. I don't know many people who would argue with that. I find it to be self-evident, in fact.

Kids play drums at every junior high school in the country. How many of them will be good enough to play professionally? I'd say relatively few. You disagreed with that statement, though.
First, as a percentage of the population, the number of kids playing drums in junior high school is really very small, as any kid who has tried to start a band in junior high or high school can tell you. The limiting factor on starting your first band is being able to get a drummer. Hell, on any level getting and keeping a drummer is a problem.

Second, of those who have the natural ability to play drums, only those who put in the work will get anywhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drpeacock View Post
If we're going to parse words to that degree let's not edit my post. I said "relatively few." Again I return to the number of kids in middle school, junior high, and high school who pick up sticks and hit drums. How many of them will ever be good enough to do it for a living? I'd say relatively few is a good description. What descriptor would you use instead?
I'd say it's a spurious argument.

The real question is how many will put in the work over time that it takes to make a career of it?

Out of the relatively few who have any talent in the first place?