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Old 14th August 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trevoire520 View Post
God where to start? Everything on this record sounds fantastic!

The guitars have a really cool thing going on where they sound absolutely huge, but not overly distorted? What amps were used?
the guitars on the record had to distinct aspects to them. There were 2 sounds that needed to happen. One was a more textural sound and one was a flat out super heavy crushing high gain ryth sound. I felt comfortable taking on the more textural stuff mostly played by Lee. We took a somewhat unique approach. We decided to use all vintage single coiled guitars but with a lot of gain. Lee played most of his parts on a Jazz Master, Tele or Les Paul Jr. through a Soldano SLO100. The problem is the hum. We ended up building a faraday cage. It worked amazing. You could walk the guitar into the cage and hear the hum disappear. Using the single coil guitars gave Lee's parts a certain clarity to the individual notes and a sort of shimmery high end that I thought was cool.

The other half of the equation was the aggressive heavy ryth guitar stuff. I enjoy recording guitar and have been lucky enough to capture some pretty cool sounds over the years, but I am no expert on super heavy high gain aggressive guitar sounds. What do you do when need that? You call Joe Barresi. He is the shaolin master of heavy guitar sounds. I decided to reach to out to Joe and hire him handle that half of the guitar recording. He was set up at another studio (A small home studio with some nice gear that was setup well for overdubs). It was great because he has the skills to be able to get great sounds and performances directly on to an analog master. the arrangements were pretty well mapped out at that point so he was able to march through a bunch of guitar overdubs with Mike while I was doing overdubs with Lee. It worked out great. It saved some time and of course Joe gets amazing guitar sounds. We had rented a variety high gain amps bogner ubershall, diezel, mod'd marshall and had a variety of 4x12 cabs. I don't know exactly what was used for what on the stuff joe recorded.

Quote:
Drums are really good too. Quite dry but nice and punchy. Can you give some details on the kit and what mics were used?
I was trying to do a specific thing on the drums. I wanted the drums to sound dry and in your face almost more like a rap record and have the excitement come from the punch of the sounds instead of the room sound. A lot of the drums were recorded in the iso booth at Barefoot Recording. the drums that were recorded in the large room had baffles setup to ensure the close mics would be really dry sounding. The mixing was a bit unique. I had to separate a lot of the sounds into 2 different parts. Have the high end or midrange part of the sound processed different than the low end part of the sound. It seemed to be the only way I could get the hyper punchy really dry thing to kind of work. I did do the underheads on these drum recordings. So there were no tome mics. I did have to mult the underheads signals so one channel was setup for the over all drum kit sound and one was gated to come on only when the toms were played. That made sure the toms would cut through the mix when he played them

Quote:
Vocals are probably the best they've sounded on any LP record to date. How did you get those performances from Ian?
When spent a lot of time working on vocal parts. Ian was very dedicated to making sure the lyrics and melodies were the very best he could come up with. I always give singers a lot of opportunities to get good performances. Voices are fickle. some days its just not there. i always start doing vocal overdubs early in the overdubbing process. It gives the singer many opportunities to revise parts, revisit songs, fix things, live with performances etc. I try to make sure they don't have to sing more than 2 or 3 hours in each day.

EV