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Old 15th April 2003
  #8
Lives for gear
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jax
In a way not directly related to the sys6k, I do feel that one. I know I've said this before, but this is why I'm recording at 16/44.1 more than I ever did before.
Now something that came to my attention lately is PT TDM sessions. I read somewhere, I think in the manual, that you are supposed to dither again on 16bit sessions as well...This obviously makes sense with the 48bit processing.

So my question as well, is doing a session at 16bit even a "16bit" session?

As far as the whole bit depth, sample rate deal.
I think if you are doing the whole DIY approach with a DAW from start to finish, I think it's worth it, but IMO where it's potentially flawed is the software SRC, as well as most individuals not being able to monitor the final mix at the intended delivery rate and bit depth. Mixers don't usually have to deal with that issue, because they turn it into the mastering engineer at the highest rate they are working at, then the ME can listen to it through superior D/A conversion into analog gear and recapture it at the intended sample rate...so they are making adjustments to the song from what it's going to be at 44.1k, not at what it was at 48 or 96, etc.

However, on an actual album last year, half was tracked to logic at 44.1, 16 bit with not the greatest A/D and half was to a mix system 48k, 24bit with Apogee A/D.
The roughs prior to mixing, I could hear the differences in the quality quite considerably. But when they were mixed by a great mixer with 48 outs on to a SSL with additional outboard gear/efx with PT being used for some processing, but mostly as a tape machine, I couldn't tell nearly as much.

My point, if there is a descent amount of outboard and analog gear, I don't think you are going to hear the differences of bit depth or sample rate nearly as much. But with that being said, I think there is a cummualatlve difference over the process when things are done at higher bit and sample rates.