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Old 9th September 2019
  #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
Looking above after posting this below, I see the topic of conversation has drifted offsides.

So I hope I can be pardoned for responding to the original topic...



Circa 1995, I was looking for an ADAT i/o card to interface my (then single) ADAT with my computer. Korg had announced a product. But they made it all but impossible to get info on it. They didn't have a website. I tried multiple times to get through via phone. I seem to recall they had an email address, but didn't respond to email requests for info.

So the next year (or maybe late that) at NAMM, I drifted past the Korg booth where I got no info on the vaporous i/o adapter. But over at the Frontier Design booth, they had working prototypes, prices, a delivery schedule (which, IIRC, they kept). I think one other smallish company (Aardvark?) was about to field one, as well, but I think it was still in the mist.

Anyhow, I bought a Frontier. I'd been doing two-track nonlinear audio editing on my machine for radio doc production for a while -- but the demands of running a multichannel native DAW in then-new Windows 95 were daunting. I contacted Frontier for info on optimizing my setup -- they had a few whitepaper type write-ups on optimization issues that were very helpful, but what really won me over was the main guy at the small company answering my emails personally, explaining a couple of fine points, and pointing me to their own write-ups as well as some other third party info.

Eventually that Korg i/o card DID come out but I never talked to anyone who bought one and I don't think it made much impact. Frontier went on to hook up with a large, popular recording device maker (doesn't rhyme with TEAC but... ahem) and so drifted out of my sphere, but I will always have a soft spot for them and that first i/o card. It wasn't cheap -- but it was out there ahead of the pack and the company went the extra 9 yards to support it and keep us early customers happy.
Right. That’s basically what I’m talking about. I know product development is really difficult and something like communication with future customers can be low on the list of priorities, but I’ve seen it done well, and I’ve seen it done poorly. I don’t think Waldorf is really great at it, but they’re great at other things. Maybe investing in some sort of media relations person would be a good idea. I hereby volunteer. All you have to do is send me one of each of your product line.