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Old 23rd February 2019
  #6
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lionaudio View Post
You've wrote a melody, you now need to compliment it to fill out the song, what would you do to achieve this?

I find a different melody that compliments the original. If i start using instruments, I then hum vocal melodies over the top of them. If I start with a vocal melody, I start playing a rhythm melody underneath
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What cadences do you like to use that could be deemed unusual/rare?

I really like odd **** like King Crimson, Rush, etc... where appropriate so I have no problem writing parts that are in 7, 9, 11, etc... Whatever makes the hairs on my arms stand up
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On a more overall scale how would you interlock multiple songs to make them feel connected?

Using reoccurring melodies in the same way that a film score uses them. Certain melodies represent certain characters or moods. If I'm thinking of album sequencing, I may create ambient or spoken pieces that act as a segue from song to song
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How would you explain the principle of Sonata form to a beginner?

I don't know what this is. I never took lessons except for saxophone for a few years. I play a ton of instruments but I'm basically self taught
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What are your personal opinions on what makes certain types of music epic, glorious, joyous?

Tension. To me, the most epic music has a feeling of contracting and expanding. The longer it takes to get to the "payoff" the more effective it is. To me, Sigur Ros are masters of this as well as Slint, Godspeed you Black Emperor. There are also certain key changes that add to that feeling of being immensely "profound". A good example of this is Pachelbel's Canon in D. There is a certain shift in the melody that is just soul crushing
Very good point with tension. And yeah modulation into another key even as simple as going from Cm to CMaj and so on can be very impactful. Along with odd time signatures tempo is another thing to mix with that. 9/8 at say 40bpm could create quite a "epic" foreboding feeling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by s wave View Post
To interconnect songs look no further than the Beatles. Go over their early albums... focus on what note or chord they ended a song... with how they intro ed the next. Short sweet and absolutely works.
Sure definitely they were good at such a thing.

Sorry for not replying to these messages earlier, had a busy few weeks.