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Old 13th June 2018
  #5
Lives for gear
If you don't have a career in mind that requires specific training or a Masters or Doctorate, do not get a Bachelor's degree. Aside from being incredibly expensive, it becomes even more expensive when your degree does little more than put you at the front of the line for positions that don't require a degree and pay hourly wages, not salary. A bachelor's degree means absolutely nothing to employers these days, unless it's very specific and a step towards a particular master's degree or doctorate.

As if this weren't painful enough on income prospects, there's a huge possibility that you will not be able to finish in 5 years, let alone 4. Degree programs and requirements, as well as course credit values and applicability are constantly changing these days. You may take a math course that was equivalent of 4 credits towards a science major when you enrolled, but when it comes time to start the science sequence, that course no longer counts for full credit, essentially meaning you have to take it over again before you're allowed to move onto your major.

I initially attended a 4-year state university, and after 3 and 1/2 years barely had 2 years worth of credits that actually counted towards my degree. Granted I was also working to pay the bills, but I ended up moving back with my parents, and decided to consolidate my state university credits into my local state community college for an associate's degree. Worked great on paper, until more than half my university credits magically expired and/or value reduced to half credits. On top of that, my AP and second language qualifications from high-school somehow no longer applied. I was for all intents and purposes, starting completely from scratch, except for a few creative/elective 2 credit courses. I went from having enough credits to get a dual associates degree with two majors in math and science after a light semester of electives, to having to take calculus, chemistry, and physics sequences all over again. I've taken precalculus FIVE times in my life. I literally aced the course the last two times I took it hahaha Literally 99% score to the syllabus, with ease, as second nature. That's when I decided I was sick of college and they were never going to let me have the degree I wanted, so I decided to leave rather than get a BS BS in Liberal Arts and Psychology. Better to have the experience than racked with debt and a BS BS in BS. Such BS.