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Old 16th June 2017
  #1
Writing to Your Full Potential

I've been looking around for exercises or some sort of path to writing lyrics in a more open and honest way. I feel as though my lyrics are restricted by the melody, and overall structure of the song, as well as the concept I am writing about. Much focus gets placed on the concept but I am not necessarily satisfied with the overall expression - even after fleshing out the lyrics I still feel it is impersonal and lacks the intimacy that I enjoy in other people's writing.

In a lot of the music I have been listening to, the variation in the melody keeps my attention, and songwriters are even able to create parts of the song based around the melodic direction - changes happen to "highlight" a lyrical moment, and there is enough variation from verse to verse to differentiate what part of the song you're in. It feels more open, and free flowing - as opposed to something that feels like it's within this box. Am I just too afraid to change up the song?

Examples (Albums)
- The Swell Season "Strict Joy"
- Nick Cave "Push The Sky Away" & "Skeleton Tree"
- The National "Boxer"
- Ani Difranco "Puddle Dive" & "Dilate"
- Daniel Johns "Talk"
- Fiona Apple "When The Pawn"
- The Smashing Pumpkins "Mellon Collie"
- Bjork "Vespertine"

All these albums have a flow to them - they almost feel conversational.

Are there any tips and tricks you might have that keeps things into perspective when writing? Was there any "ah ha!" moments throughout your journey that you can attribute to a certain practice? Looking for any kind of advice in active ways to get better. I have read "writing better lyrics", by what's his face, but I have never really been into his country song way of writing, or the focus he places on the listener - I'm not trying to be the next Jason Mraz. I definitely place more of a focus on songwriting as an art rather than craft - not to say that Mraz is not an artist, but let's be real - there is a difference between writing a song and writing a single.

How did you learn to write to your full potential?