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Old 9th June 2016
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by fl00die View Post
micholic : A little light?. it is the 10cm thickness which seems to be the thickest possible?... along with the air gap and room in a room.

GLenn : thanks that's great, looking on amazon now!

Kyle : thank you for your lengthy post.. Appreciated.. I have a couple of comments.
- Do you mind suggesting an alternative then to the rather expensive Rockwool RW3 if you don't mind?. there seems to be loads and im worried to use just normal DIY rolls for lofts etc.

- The floating floor... Are you sure I shouldn't float the floor?.... From these forums I have always read how things should be decoupled... If I didn't have a floating floor that the inner walls are build off then the inner walls would be connected to the wood base which in turn is connected to the outer walls.. This isn't decoupled at all... you could then ask the question of having a room within a room at all?.. honest query there if you could help if much appreciate it...

- floating ceiling.. Well its not, but imagine the joists of a roof that are say 60cm apart from each other... the say I have lower joists that are running parallel to the main rood joists but slightly lower and in between the 60cm voids of the roof joists... these lower/floating joists keen the main inner room solid as they connect the inner walls together but still are decoupled from the outer shell.. hope that helps

- thanks re: the ventilation.. im looking at it now as a real priority in the room and not just as a "ah well, lets bung a fan in somewhere"... thank you.

- Yes caulking will be done
Hey there. Your first most important step is accomplished, by ordering the book. It changed my life.

Insulation- standard Unfaced fiberglass, typical of what you would see in any old wall cavity or attic. The pink or yellow stuff, that resembles cotton candy, but isn't nearly as enjoyable. I'm not sure if your in the US or not, so I'm not exactly sure how common it is in your area. That said around here, it's easy to acquire at home improvement stores, and always cheaper than Rockwool.

When you get into Rockwool and ridgid fiber glass, it's not often for the finished interior acoustic treatment, again unless code dictates otherwise. Behind the drywall, in cavities, standard insulation does and equal, or better job, often significantly cheaper.

I think Glenn knows a thing or two, (okay a lot) about the interior treatments, and proper application of materials, so I'm sure he won't steer ya wrong in that Dept. #keepitloose

A link to standard wall cavity insulation for illustration purposes:

http://http://www.acehardware.com/pr...a=pla_11342888

You've got the right idea on the ceiling joists, I know it as "independently framed" but that's semantic at this point. The book will show you exactly how to accomplish it, with detailed drawings.

Congrats on taking your ventilation seriously. I've seen some sweaty artists coming out of booths, and experienced some funky smells. Not the fun kind that makes ya giggle. Just the stank. You'll thank yourself the first day of extreme hot or cold.

Kudos on the caulking.

The floor- floating is always the last option. It doesn't mean you shouldn't do it, it just means you might not have to.

Could you detail how the existing floor is constructed, and if your on the ground floor, or upper level?

Ideally your on a concrete slab, and then there's nothing really you have to do, but here are some options with that if you have certain preferences, or requirements.

If you could outline the existing structure some more it'd be very helpful. The size, construction method/style, exiting electricity and existing Windows and doors.

Also what you expect from this room, like as far as isolation, whether your mixing, or just jamming, how 'pro' you need it, your budget, your budget, your musical style(s) and your monitoring setup.

Your gonna need to outline your gear too, when your specing out the electrical service.

There's a very good chance you'll not need two doors. A standard solid core door with added mass, and good durable, redundant seals, is often just what the doctor ordered.

At the risk of sounding too much like a fan... That's also in the book.

So hopefully this helped a little. I commend you for taking the time to investigate and ask questions. It'll pay dividends.