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Old 23rd May 2016
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthewrayrgv View Post
I mean 6 or more people. I thought about just doing several takes of a solo instrument but I though since it's sampled, wouldn't that not work since every recording will be the same samples as the last recording?
Hi again, if you think of a string ensemble of 6 or more people.... don't forget that if you hear 6(+) people every time you write or play a note, you'll end up with 24 or 30 people once you create a four or 5 voice harmony. And due to how crossfades between dynamic layers often function in string libraries, you can double that amount if you eg use your mod-wheel to crossfade between two dynamic layers - something which happens a lot of you want to fake real strings, because it's often the dynamic changes throughout a melodic line or harmonic voice which makes it sounds like strings and not a synth.

"I thought about just doing several takes of a solo instrument but I though since it's sampled, wouldn't that not work since every recording will be the same samples as the last recording?"
A good string library comes with at three our four dynamic layers. Not only that, but good, modern libraries also offer so called round robin samples: meaning that you have multiple samples of the same note, not avoid the machine gun (static) effect which often is heard on old libraries if one repeats a note multiple times. And one can lock a melody into using only one of the round robin samples (for each note), so that if you dub yourself, the dub will use a different set of round robin notes meaning that they won't sound like the first take you recorded. In addition, there's a transpose trick which let's you fool your sampler to use the round robin samples of one of the close by notes (you have to transpose what you play up by, sa a major second, and transpose the sampler down by the same amount).

The above technique is used to create the sound of a larger ensemble even if the samples you use are of small groups (eg 3 or 4) of players. This way, a chamber library could easily become more useful than a full symphonic set if samples, because if each sample contain, say, 16 players, the main thing you can do to make it sound smaller is to stick to close mic positions.

Check this out:


ETA... and just to contradict myself a little, here's an example of how one to some degree can get an intimate sounds even when using samples of large ensembles - due to the existence of multiple sets of recordings of each sample) using different mic positions.


Last edited by nativeaudio; 23rd May 2016 at 08:50 PM..