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Old 17th December 2014
  #179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hot Vibrato View Post


What people don't realize is that Gibson's workmanship has always been a little rough. They were never perfect, and they're still not. Same with Fender - I'd say their guitars are actually better and more consistent now than they've ever been. I used to work for a Fender service center, and to encounter a defective truss rod or unlevel frets on a fender neck was a relatively rare occurrence. I can't say the same about the levelness of Gibson's frets, but I would still contend that Gibson's workmanship is no worse now than it ever was - like I said, Gibsons have always been a little rough. But I have yet to encounter a new Gibson guitar (that's not defective) that couldn't be made to play perfectly with some setup work and minor fretwork.
I disagree. In fact I disagree rather strongly.

There's a new J-200 in my local GC on which the moustache bridge looks like a rough, unfinished routing. The top of the moustache is flat, not curved, and there's a distinct router ridge where the flat top meets the routed curve of the cutouts. Ugly - they took the part direct off the router and glued it on without the slightest attempt at proper finishing. And that's on their top of the line, flagship acoustic guitar! The whole build looks cheap and slapdash compared to my late, lamented '58.

That's probably why it's been sitting there for a year and a half with no buyers. Occasionally I go in and offer them $1500 out the door. Which is well below their cost. I wouldn't be surprised if they actually took my offer one of these days, it's been sitting so long.

Anyone who says there isn't a clear difference in quality probably isn't old enough to remember the quality of brand new Gibsons before about '65 or '66. By '68 they were well on the way to going down the toilet. The rumor at the time was that the reason was that a lot of the best wood was being snapped up by the military for the war effort but I think that a lot of it was that the parent company was only interested in how many units they could crank out.