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Roland TR8S - Drum machine with individual outs and sampling.

Tap tempo most likely. 4 years ago: Roland: "Here's a TR drum machine with TR808 and 909 sounds. You know, that thing you always wanted us to make since you missed out on the cheap secondhand originals in the late 80s" Gearslutz: "Ugh, it's got green sides. So ugly. Why can't it have more drumkits? Why doesn't...

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Behringer RD808 Analog Drum Machine

How many people want a TR808? Enough that the originals are selling for 3000-5000$ on a regular basis. Behringer will sell a boatload of these because they are the only company to actually give people what they've been asking for for the last 20 years. This is the whole point of market economics and capitalism...

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Behringer RD808 Analog Drum Machine

...timeline and reserve future developments around TR synthesis for their future designs. Now when the fashion is to use the TR-808 to make basslines a simple pitch control wouldn't have really satisfied the crowd looking for an updated 808.

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Product Description

The Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer (a.k.a. the "808") was one of the first programmable drum machines ("TR" standing for Transistor Rhythm). Introduced by the Roland Corporation in the early 1980s, it was originally manufactured for use as a tool for studio musicians to create demos. Like earlier Roland drum machines, it does not sound very much like a real drum kit. However, the TR-808 cost US$1,195 upon its release, which was considerably more affordable than digital sampling machines such as the US$5,000 Linn LM-1. Drum machines became an integral part of hip hop music as a cheap and simple way of producing a drum sound. The Roland TR-808 held specific appeal because of the ability of its bass drum sound to produce extremely low-frequency sounds. It also featured various unique artificial percussion sounds that characterized the TR-808: a deep bass kick drum, "tinny handclap sounds", "the ticky snare, the tishy hi-hats (open and closed) and the spacey cowbell". The Roland TR-808 would eventually be used on more hit records than any other drum machine, and has thus attained an iconic status within the music industry. The machine's successor was the Roland TR-909.