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Last Minute Gigs Stories...
Old 2nd August 2005
  #1
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Talking Last Minute Gigs Stories...

When I say "Last Minute" I mean same day or the night before, et cetera, etc. How many of you folks been there? And, what did you do to facilitate that request?

I my three decade career I may have done more than two last minute gigs but, only two of them were memorable enough to remember for a life time.

Here are my two super last minute gig stories...

The first one that stuck in my mind was when I got a call from an associate to record James Brown at Studio 54 for a 1981 live concert video shoot. He asked me if I wanted to record JB. Needless to say, I said, of course when is the gig? He replied, right now! They're doing a sound check and rehearsing as we speak. How fast can you get to us? I said, the gear is ready to go but, I don't think I can get a crew quick enough to make this happen. He said, I got plenty of crew, just come down and we’ll provide everything else. I raced down to the venue; we started setting up; we literally had a "bucket brigade" set up for this task. Believe it or not, we set everything up and still had time to record the last song of their rehearsal/sound check to play around with before the start of the live video shoot. Crazy, right?

The other time was in the early 90s. I got a call from MTV to record the Red Hot Chili Peppers at Roseland Ballroom for a live concert video shoot. I got the call the night before. We were updating our truck. We had most of the bays out getting ready to rewire the entire patchbay. The crew was in the process of severing the cables to the audio patchbay. I ask my MTV contact to hold the line a second so I can check on my crew and see if it was possibile to do this gig for them. I raced into to the truck and screamed STOP, DON'T CUT ANYTHING! I asked Ed if he cut any lines yet. I was just about to, he replied. I said, stop the process, can you get everything back in order enough to do a gig tomorrow. He said, yes we can. I raced back to the phone and told them we can do the gig. The only problem was MTV still didn’t have the rights to the show. We had to wait until the following day (show day that is) to find out if it was a go or not. I ask what time would she know. She said, sometime in the morning. Well, it was early afternoon and we still didn’t know. We held the wiring project up to make this happen for them and we still didn’t know what was going on. Since we haven't heard from them, I was about to start the wiring process all over again but, I held tight a bit longer. A few hours later, we got the call that it was a go. Again, we raced down to the venue and started setting up during their sound check. Unfortunately for us the sound company wasn’t very happy about the situation so, more time was wasted dealing with their issues. In any event the show got recorded and it aired a few weeks later.

What about you folks? Any crazy stories to tell? I'm all ears.
Old 7th August 2005
  #2
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
I figured this thread would get a few bites...

So, no last minute gigs to talk about? Shucks.

I hope it's because you're too busy to take them on!

More power to you.
Old 7th August 2005
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
bradb's Avatar
 

I've got a last minute gig story... but its not a gig one, its a performance one. I was in college and my roomates and I were throwing a party. We were going to have bands play. A band I was playing drums in cancelled on me the night before, so I put together a Misfits cover band the MORNING of the party, rehersed 6 or 7 songs throught the day and played that night with an excellent reception. Very cool.
Old 8th August 2005
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Jim vanBergen's Avatar
 

Steve, nice stories.

Here's a learning experience I will never forget:
One of the WORST was getting a call at 8pm on a Friday night and being told, hey the show is tomorrow night, and me saying fine. The producer then said, "Great, so we'll have a car at your house in an hour to go to JFK". WHAT? The gig was in CHICAGO and load in was at 7am the next morning. So.... I packed my multitrack & master recorder in a flight case rack, a mic kit and my overnight bag and went to Chicago. The next day I interfaced with a CRAPPY local video truck that was in no way designed to do a multitrack record, worked with the four college kids who were utilities and had no clue how to mic/wire/setup a band or their backline, but eventually the band showed up with their road crew, we made it all work. The mutitrack arrived with a HUGE dent in the case...and the frame...and the machines, but they work, and the show goes on, and the show aired live. Post-show the producer is clapping me on the back and saying thanks it sounded great and you saved my ass, and then some guy walks up, says he is from the label and needs to take the recording back for the DVD. This is a first, zero warning. I say not without paperwork, he says here's my card, I needs them Monday 9AM at the label's office in NYC and to drop them off and there will be a contract and check waiting. So I fly back to NY the next morning, go to the shop and spend four hours doing transfers to DA-88s, and get a couple of hours of sleep before dropping them off at the label at 9am, where there is no check and no contract. Oh, did I mention they received the tapes, but never returned a phone call, mailed a contract or a check? Ah...at least I got paid for the gig. Live & learn!

JvB
Old 8th August 2005
  #5
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Remoteness's Avatar
That's a tough one...

You never learn if you don't make mistakes!!!
Old 20th May 2006
  #6
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
You know what I hate the most?

Last minute gigs that you make happen for the client then they cancel on you or back out of the situation leaving your crew and the dates you juggled around to make happen hanging...

That "sheet" sucks big time -- And there's nothing you can do about it but say no up front.

Many of you folks have it happen to you? Do you care to talk about it?
Old 21st May 2006
  #7
Gear Head
 

This isn't a recording so i don't know how it would fit in...but it is kinda funny. I've been doing live sound for about 18 years but I'm one of those weird sound types that has never been a muscian...well thats not entirely true, after about 8 beers I have been known to do a little karaoke.

Anyway, a good buddy of mine was the lead FOH engineer at one the local Indian gaming casino showrooms here in California. Its a good size room and holds about 1,000 people and has a pretty awesome system and I used go up their once in a while to visit my buddy and sometimes help the crew setup.

One Saturday i was helping set the main act for that night and we did sound check at around 7pm and then band was told to get some dinner and return for the show at 9pm. Well it turns out the drummer goes for a drive and his car broke down. I guess you can see where this is going, the drummer does not make it back in time for the show and I get drafted to play drums.
I tell my buddy "I'm not a musician, I cant play the drums" and my buddy told me "don't worry about it, neither can their drummer". His humor kinda calmed me down but I did tell him to bury the drums in the mix and really push the bass. I actually payed almost a full 45 minute set before the real drummer finally showed up. Actually it wasn't too bad, the band did all top 40 cover stuff so at least I had an idea of what they were playing.

That was my first and last drumming performance, I hung up the sticks and retired from my short and semi-illustrious drumming career.

heh
Old 22nd May 2006
  #8
Lives for gear
 
celticrogues's Avatar
 

Heres one for you:

I work in Recording Services at the college I attend; we are responsible for recording all of the recitals that happen in the music school (usually at least one a night). We have 2 dedicated studio spaces that can be used simultaneously to record concerts, and 2 other spaces that are used for other recording projects but can be used to record recitals if necessary. We have three recital halls, all of which have flown mics to record the recitals, so basically all you have to do is patch the correct room into the correct studio and hit record.

One day at a staff meeting I got asked to do a recital that was scheduled for that night. It was not one of the regularly scheduled recitals, meaning it would not take place in one of the three recital halls that we have flown mics in, so I would have to set up mics myself. That was fine, as I figured it still wouldn't take too long and agreed to do it. The admin staff had known about the recital for awhile, but had failed to actually assign it to an engineer until the date of the recital. Hence the last minuteness.

I knew I had to set up mics, so I got there earlier than I normally would - about an hour and a half before the recital. I went to the studios to set up the Pro Tools rig first, and lo and behold - discovered that there were 3 other recitals and a recording session occurring at the same time. All of these things had been scheduled for weeks and had precedence over my gig, so this meant that all 4 of our studio spaces were being used to record other things, and there was no where for me to record this recital.

My only option at this point (besides giving up and letting Recording Services get a bad rep for not recording a concert the performer had personally paid for) was to use my personal gear that I use for non-school related recording (Mbox and laptop at the time). So with time ticking fast, I jogged the 10 or so minutes back to my dorm room, packed up my equipment in record time, and jogged back to the school carrying a backpack of computer gear, a duffel of mics and cables, a stand, and a table. I stopped in the studios to raid the mic closet (which had already been picked over by the guy doing to recording session) for better mics and better pres than I had and hurried downstairs to the room where the recital was to take place. At this point there were 45 minutes to the start of the show.

So when I got in the room (a huge square room that sounds like a barn) I discovered that there was no stage area like I thought there was going to be, and there was not going to just one or two performers at a time like I thought there was going to be. Instead, there were four seperate ensembles set up one in each corner of the room. The ensembles were varied, there was guitar, piano and vocal soloist; percussion ensemble and vocalist; string quartet, tuba, glockenspiel, and vocalist, and piano, flutes, clarinets, and vocalist. It was a composition recital and the music was to be continuous with no applause or space between pieces.

I freaked out a little - I had less than an hour to get my whole rig set up and only had 2 inputs on the Mbox, so I couldn't mic each ensemble seperately. In the end, I got it done in time (barely) with a blumlein configuration of C414's placed smack dab in the middle of the room (the audience was in a circle too) and positioned so each lobe was trained on one ensemble. It worked pretty well, and the performers seemed happy with the recording.

Cheers,
-MIke
Old 23rd September 2012
  #9
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Anymore, "last minute gig" stories to tell?
Old 23rd September 2012
  #10
I was having a party about two years ago, on a Saturday night, and I was talking to an orchestral bass player. She was complaining about this free rehearsal she had to do the next day for doctoral conducting seminar, where they got no class credit but were only being paid in pizza to play Brahms' 3rd symphony over and over for three hours as different conductors came to the podium and video- and audio- recorded their wizardry.

And instead of absorbing and empathizing with her, I heard this ".... 3 hour.... session.... Brahms 3...... Video and audio recording....."

So at like 10pm I get the head honcho's email and phone number and leave a few messages, hoping I can move fast enough that in 15 hours, i'd have a gig recording one of my favorite symphonies with an orchestra of top-notch grad students, and In a pseudo-studio environment! Think about the editing practice such a capture would offer!

So we got in touch the next morning, worked out a reasonable financial figure and away we went! Saved those guys having to figure out the technical stuff, and got me some hard-to-come-by orchestral recording experience.

Of course the real laugh came when, 30 minutes before downbeat, I am all set up in the big hall on campus where I assumed the rehearsal was to be and nobody has shown up yet.... I call the guy and they are in ANOTHER big hall a few blocks away. Thank goodness for Tony Faulkner's easy 4 mic array and the "Reality Distortion Field".
Old 23rd September 2012
  #11
Lives for gear
We were recording a top UK Folk Rock band in various gigs for BBC TV Omnibus.
Multi Track truck booked for one big venue
Did not materialise,went to the wrong location
I recorded FOH straight to stereo
Truck arrived during support act finale
We cross plugged splitters during the interval with nasty splats on the PA..
The tape rolled just in time.
Using the FOH tape and the multis we had good cover,but it was very tight...

Other time v short order call to record musical lecture on Palindromes in new Performance Theatre
Stereo piano music and 2 voices on Radios on stage
Rigged in record time and levels fine
Show starts, all is well,but as soon as performers play piano , the theatre tech mutes the radios and is very slow to unmute them
Missing many cues
Ok in the theatre it has great acoustics for the audience, rubbish for the record, my line feed is muted too...
Motto
Never do gigs in a hurry
Other show, Royal Shakespear Company for BBC TV again
Edith Piaf, Biography, with music and performance.
Close ups ,onstage with the band and actors, in the afternoon ,wides with audience at night.
On stage, 2 recordists, 2 cameras.
We record a number and then play it back for singles and BCUs
Tapes being passed from one recordist to the other to playback or record,
somehow, unknown to us at the time in the hectic rush, one master is erased....
Back at base , major bollocking from the film editor
However she managed to reconstitute the master, as luckily we were recording the playbacks as line feeds as well as LS feeds.
Saved by the editor again ,and the show won an award..
Every day stories of Telefolk.
Old 24th September 2012
  #12
Lives for gear
 

One day in 1991 I was home in SF with my kids (very young), wife out of town, and got a call from 2 producers I know well. They were shooting a music video out in Stockton (83 miles away) with a famous artist and director. The two of them had decided that instead of doing all their live-record and sync playback scenes the next day (with a sound guy coming up from LA) they wanted to do them THAT day--like right then. Uh....ok. I managed to line up a sitter, throw all my gear into the van (Nagra reel to reels in those days) and scream out to Stockton at light speed to get there in time for them to shoot some scenes in daylight, then worked with them all night. The final shots were just the director (Bruce Weber), the artist (Chris Isaak), the DP (Harris Savides) and me driving around aimlessly in Chris's 1963 Nova for hours into the night as Chris sang the song over and over. A breathless, but very cool gig. Chris and Bruce were very personable and very grateful that I had dropped everything to come out and make their schedule work. Here's the video:
Chris Isaak - blue spanish sky.mp4 - YouTube

phil p
Old 24th September 2012
  #13
We were scheduled to do an Orchestra concert at 3:30 pm. So we were going to set up at 1:00 pm. I got a call from the orchestra at 12:00 noon wondering where we were as the concert had been moved until 1:30 pm. Called my assistant, gathered up my equipment - got to the hall and setup and was ready for the downbeat at 1:30 pm. They changed the schedule but forgot to tell us.

I was suppose to do a concert in a local chapel. The concert had been scheduled for 8:00 pm but they had to reschedule it for 7:30 pm. The forgot to tell us until we were there to set up. We got it set up and ready in a hurry and everything went of AOK.

I have been called to do concert recordings at 3 PM when the caller did not call until 1 pm. I usually turn them down since I need some help to setup and last minute concerts don't allow me to use my assistants. Most times they had another student lined up but at the last minute they baled. I have thought about renting them a zoom type recorder and a cheap HD digital camera but it not something I want to do.

Good topic~
Old 26th September 2012
  #14
Gear Head
back in '91 I was asked to be asst. engineer on a session in a studio outside of LA. I was pretty excited because it was an SSL studio and a "real" session - one of my first. I got there early, zero'd out the console, cleaned everything up, aligned the two Studers, made sure they were synched. Then waited for the crew to arrive - producer Rick Knowles and mix engineer Peter Arata. We started at maybe 2 or 3 pm, and worked on that *one* song until maybe 4 am. It was a looong day... but it was cool learning the real mixing tricks, replacing tracks with samples, etc. Everything went pretty smoothly. But it was a long day.

Here's the track: Electric Girlfriend - Gregg Alexander - YouTube

I drove back to my apartment in LA and crashed. At maybe 8 am, the phone rang and it was the studio - they had another session - THAT morning. So I dragged myself out of bed and drove back out there... gave the studio a once over, aligned the machines, and then Tony Phillips and John Waite showed up for a lead vocal recording/comping session for a track on Bad English's 2nd album.

I was already tired... but it was really interesting watching these guys work. The first part was the mic selection. The studio owner had suggested a U47 FET, but John didn't care for it. So they tried several other mics and ended up with an ELA-M251. One detail I remember was setting some phone books under the feet of the mic stand to get it up high enough... don't know why that was necessary but I guess it was.

It was taking a while and this time, I didn't have much to do but sit there. They recorded three vocal takes, punching into each. Then they comped them using the SSL automation. After I could see that I wasn't really needed, and I was struggling to stay awake, I asked if they needed me or if I could head out. They sent me on my way.

I had been scheduled to work another session later that week but the studio receptionist called to cancel. I asked why but she said she didn't know. I never worked at that studio again and never found out why. I suspect the owner was not happy that I left that session, but that's only a guess.

Here's the track: Bad English - Rebel Say A Prayer - YouTube
Old 15th October 2012
  #15
Gear Head
 
Javi's Avatar
One-man orchestra

Around June I was asked to quote a recording of an orchestra. I never heard from the client again, until mid-September, when the engineer who was going to mix this recording (who has been doing this for 50 years and is a great person) calls me asking me how was the preparation since we were 2 days away. I was lucky enough to be able to set up everything on time, this was a 48-track, 4 days, 40 musicians orchestra, in a new concert hall which has great acoustics but since it was just opening, the administration still had some things to improve (like telling the recorder that he's got the job). We were supposed to set everything up on tuesday morning and be able to record the rehearsals of tuesday, wednesday, thursday, friday and the show which was friday afternoon, leaving everything untouched and without moving any mic stand so that all takes would sound the same. But another thing was missed: we had to remove all our mics, stands and cables after each rehearsal because the hall's administration had set-up another artists at the evening of every day (ballet, etc).

The orchestra had a drummer with an acrylic drumshield. So he complained that the didn't hear well the front of the ensemble, and demanded (not asked, but demanded) a headphone mix. This is not usual at all, but trying to please him and our client, we agreeded. Then he complained that the quality of the hp (Sony mdr7506) wasn't professional. The he complained about the mix quality, that he was having latency problems (which was impossible since no a/d was happenning before his mix). I explained him that the "latency" he was hearing was a result of the distance from the front vs. his hp mix, but he woludn't listen to me. All of this, not in private but stopping the takes, shouting and blaming us in front of the entire orchestra, the hall staff and others. Then he asked for individual micing of his drums (which at this point was not just impossible but also delaying the whole day for the 60+ people working around this). It was clear that nothing we could do would ease his mind, and he was just frustrated for something else that we didn't know. So we gave him a personal mixer where he could level and balance his own monitoring levels. This ended up with him monitoring very loud and playing even louder, and ruining most of the takes. You should have seen the faces of his fellow orchestra members when they came to the control room and heard the takes. Even the orchestra director told him over and over to drop the headphones and just hear like everybody does in a well balanced orchestra.

All the others musicians were a pleasure to deal with, but this particular person was, I guess, just having a very bad week.

This was a lesson for me. The next time I will think twice before making an effort to save someone else and agreeing on this kind of last-minute things.
Old 15th October 2012
  #16
Many times people in charge of large groups just assume that you keep up on all the changes in the groups schedule because they deal with it on a daily basis.

I do some recording of the Canton Orchestra. They are great people to work with and I love doing their recordings. I also have done recordings for other local regional orchestras and I wish they could see what a REAL pro orchestra is all about and how well the orchestra people are organized and keep everyone in the loop.

I had the same problem you ran into with the local college when we were doing a major Piano recording session. The college, in all their wisdom, scheduled rehearsals and performances for every night of the three day recording session. Each night I had to break down all my equipment and haul it back to my office since the college refused to allow us to lock up our equipment in the hall or in a locked room. One day we got there and an overzealous stage hand had taken off all of our spike tape and luckily we had it all written down with exact measurements.

I really don't enjoy doing recordings when you have to load in and load out every day.

Sometimes remote recording can be NOT FUN!
Old 16th October 2012
  #17
Lives for gear
 
boojum's Avatar
Thomas, we will have to call you Joe Btfsplk because you sure seem to have that fellow's luck. I am never going to ask you to pick my lottery numbers. LOL
Old 16th October 2012
  #18
Gear Addict
I was booked on a video shoot in a small tv truck to record a live performance for a singer at a casino in Atlantic City. I arrive on site, armed only with a pair of mics and stands for ambience. (typical for this sort of session - PA feeds + ambience) The client arrives and says they want to multitrack the session. My MX2424 is 3 hours away in New York. There is nothing available locally BUT - the truck has 6 beta VCR's with 4 audio tracks each. But there is no splitter, the truck desk is not really set up for this sort of thing and the House PA call is 1 hour before downbeat. We talk to the stage manager who proves to be very helpful and I end up taking a combination of principle mics and groups equaling 24 tracks. The session is actually a success. But the artist gets to LA and has no way to deal with 6 beta tapes. So I call a film dubbing friend in LA and he transfers all their material (about 90 + minutes) to a MX2424, one beta tape at a time - 360 minutes of dubbing plus rewind and spot checks. At the end of it all the client was happy, but it just shows you what poor planning can cost.
Old 16th October 2012
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by boojum View Post
Thomas, we will have to call you Joe Btfsplk because you sure seem to have that fellow's luck. I am never going to ask you to pick my lottery numbers. LOL

One reason I never play the lottery...
Old 16th October 2012
  #20
Gear Guru
 
John Willett's Avatar
 

Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness View Post
Anymore, "last minute gig" stories to tell?
This was a few years back and I had a phone call from Tony Faulkner.

He had been triple-booked by the same company to do three recordings at three venues at the same time in different parts of the country.

So, please, would I stand in for him and do the last day of a three-day recording session in Worcester Cathedral?

I was, of course, delighted - and recorded the last day for him, de-rigged at the end and brought all the kit back to Tony's place afterwards.

No problems - but an interesting day.
Old 16th October 2012
  #21
I had one this summer. There was a four day chamber music festival. The presenters wanted it recorded but didn't let the host know until the first day of the event. I was finally called after he reached one of my clients. My car was already (mostly) packed with gear from a previous recording so I had no problem taking the job. The hard part was an hour window to drive 35 miles in rush hour traffic to have enough time to setup.

Never one to turn down paying work.
Old 17th October 2012
  #22
Many moons ago on a cold February morning 1999 I got a call from an Italian business manager asking if we were available to record an opera in Detroit the following October. No details, just wanted verbal price quote. never heard back from him.
Fast forward to a brisk Tuesday morning in the third week of October. I get a phone call from a very jovial Italian man asking what hotel we're in, what time is load in and what microphones we had. The first rehearsal is Thursday morning. Told him I had no idea who he was and was he sure he had the right company. A flurry of phone calls back and forth across the Atlantic ensues and after about 12 hours it turns out that they are wanting to record the operatic debut of a very famous Italian tenor. This is in the days before email so faxes start pouring out of the machine with details and contracts culminating in a three word fax- "Wire Money Immediately". We loaded a pair of 3324's and the entire kit of gear to support that many channels, ordered $25,000 of tape to be drop shipped from the factory and arranged 16 channels of Sennheiser wireless that would work in Detroit.
Loaded the truck on Wednesday morning and after the wire transfer cleared, drove the truck 14 hours to Detroit. Loaded in at 11pm, overnight hung 24 mics, built 8 into sets and had the wireless up and tested for hair and makeup call at 8am.
Ended up spending over a month is Detroit (Including Halloween! very scary indeed) and did a 12 camera (including jib) live webcast that was watched by dozens ;-)
All the best,
-mark
Old 19th October 2012
  #23
Gear Addict
 
c1ferrari's Avatar
 

philper

Nice vid (#12)...never enjoyed it before -- good work
Thanks.
Old 19th October 2012
  #24
Lives for gear
 
johnsound's Avatar
A few years ago:

Composer: Hi, John, I'm doing this community opera and we'd quite like a recording.

Me: OK, when and where?

Comp: Dress rehearsal in an hour, then just three performances over the next three days. Hackney Empire Theatre.

Me: I'll come and watch what's left of the dress rehearsal and let you know.

Later, at the venue:

Composer: As you can see, there's a chamber orchestra in the pit, a jazz band in the stage left box, an Oud ensemble in the upper stage right box, two 100 piece choirs in the top level of the theatre, a steel band at the back of the first level to the left and a Salvation Army brass band at the back of the first level on the right. There's an amateur chorus of a couple of hundred local people and six professional singers.

Me: Um... It's not going to be easy.

But we did it, despite one of the leads losing his voice and having to be sung in from the pit, the abandonment of the first performance part way through when a piece of scenery came loose and knocked out one of the amateur chorus members and a host of other problems. All done with a pair of Sony PCM 800s, so we could run continuously, and a great deal of post production.

Jonathan Dove/Nick Dear The Palace in the Sky . Hackney Empire 5 November 00

Regards,

John
Old 19th October 2012
  #25
Lives for gear
Last minute can be great fun
Back to basics best
Kitchen sink if you cant remember the basics
Do they teach basic any more ?
Old 19th October 2012
  #26
Gear Addict
 
c1ferrari's Avatar
 

O.K.

...and we have a winner
That last paragraph...WOW



Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsound View Post
A few years ago:

Composer: Hi, John, I'm doing this community opera and we'd quite like a recording.

Me: OK, when and where?

Comp: Dress rehearsal in an hour, then just three performances over the next three days. Hackney Empire Theatre.

Me: I'll come and watch what's left of the dress rehearsal and let you know.

Later, at the venue:

Composer: As you can see, there's a chamber orchestra in the pit, a jazz band in the stage left box, an Oud ensemble in the upper stage right box, two 100 piece choirs in the top level of the theatre, a steel band at the back of the first level to the left and a Salvation Army brass band at the back of the first level on the right. There's an amateur chorus of a couple of hundred local people and six professional singers.

Me: Um... It's not going to be easy.

But we did it, despite one of the leads losing his voice and having to be sung in from the pit, the abandonment of the first performance part way through when a piece of scenery came loose and knocked out one of the amateur chorus members and a host of other problems. All done with a pair of Sony PCM 800s, so we could run continuously, and a great deal of post production.

Jonathan Dove/Nick Dear The Palace in the Sky . Hackney Empire 5 November 00

Regards,

John
Old 19th October 2012
  #27
Lives for gear
 

At the other end of the tech-scale, here's the video from a no-prep-time, throw -the-gear-in-the-car, run-in-rolling-and-don't-hit-stop-until-they-leave gig I did a few years ago. This is with one mic (Sanken CS3e) on a boom.

philp

Swell Season performance, interview (Boing Boing) - YouTube
Old 5th June 2013
  #28
Here for the gear
 

I remember very well…October 31th, 2011 going to meet up with Steve Remote at his office/home like I did every morning around 11am. He opens the door practically still asleep…He had over slept and forgot it was Monday…So he invites me in, I sit down, the phone rings….

Steve answers the phone and I over hear a potential client needing an audio team for a live stream broadcast…then Steve asks…what day is the gig? Client says…we're here setting up now…we really need an audio team. Steve - who's the artist? Client - Alicia Keys….

Next thing you know we're flying into the city in Steve's bmw 80mph to go survey the venue….then we go to the shop…pack up the gear…go back to the venue set up til about 3 am. Slept for about 3 hours and woke up the next day for the gig.

Talk about last minute...
Old 5th June 2013
  #29
Lives for gear
 

RE poor venue planning, we did a music recording of a recital at a local college last year in which our setup time kept being reduced with every email and phone call--the artist simply did not have the political pull at her school to keep our setup time from being cannibalized by other people wanting to rehearse etc in the concert space. Finally it became clear that we would only be allowed into the venue when the audience was--at "doors". We hooked up everything on carts outside (in the rain), used all DC-powered gear and rolled in with everything already powered up, the mics on stands, the cables plugged at the recorder end. We made it but the audience had a little plugfest preshow.

philp
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