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When I mix alone, I prefer to be by myself
Old 11th April 2003
  #1
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Talking When I mix alone, I prefer to be by myself

Do you like to mix alone or with your client/artist?
Old 11th April 2003
  #2
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🎧 15 years
Depends. Which client?

Faith can stay. Toby Keith must go.


Regards,
Brian T
Old 11th April 2003
  #3
Moderator emeritus
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by BrianT
Depends. Which client?

Faith can stay. Toby Keith must go.
Woo Woo! The perfect answer!

Actually, I tend to be quite loud and opinionated, especially when I'm mixing really bad music; I don't think either Faith or Toby could be in my room during the mix. They could come in for approval, though - I can maintain a discrete silece for that long...
Old 11th April 2003
  #4
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David R.'s Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I like to get the sounds together alone. Nothing more anoying then dialing up a good compression (or whatever) on the bass (or whatever) and the client is in your ear saying the bass is too loud. Then you have to break concentration and tell them, again, that you are not setting levels yet.

After that, come on in, Faith. heh
Old 11th April 2003
  #5
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thethrillfactor's Avatar
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Formula for mixing a song:

65% alone at first...

35% with artist or producer in the middle...

10% with A&R and artist managent at the end... or should I say still alone?


Peaxce
Old 11th April 2003
  #6
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Tim L's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
By myself for as much of the process as I can get away with. I only like the client in the room for a final tweak or two... doesn't allways happen that way but that's my preference.
Old 11th April 2003
  #7
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Wiggy Neve Slut's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I REALLY love to get the mix happening in PEACE and then when i rekon im about 85% there ill let them in, call them up to come down or fetch them from the cafe's down stairs. I think it really helps keep perspective and maintaint trains of thought and momentum in a mix without being asked dumb ass questions..

PEACE
Wiggy
Old 11th April 2003
  #8
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mdbeh's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I like at least a few hours to myself at first.

It's not so much that I mind the client there, it's just I'm kind of antisocial when I'm mixing. It's absorbing enough that I'll look up from the board and realize I've gone 40 minutes without saying something. I worry a bit about giving off a bad vibe doing that.
Old 11th April 2003
  #9
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pounce's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
i'm sure almost everyone will have the same answer. i sure love to mix alone as long as possible. as has already been answered, it's the broken concentration and explanation while getting things set up (like compression) makes things take a lot longer with folks in the room.

i have one client i like a lot who is actually doing good music, but insists on being in the room for _everything_. i've often suggested some things could be done more quickly a different way, but he is quite certain he prefers to spend any extra time and extra money so he can be part of the process. he insists on trying just about everything and doing many rough mixes. he is getting more confident in the process, so i am whittling the time down as quickly as i can. however, he is sure he preferes to spend the money on extra studio time to do the extra mixes. as i've explained to him it could be faster cheaper, i have a clean conscience...therefore now i'm just making a little extra money and he's happy with the pace and choices.
Old 12th April 2003
  #10
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by thethrillfactor
Formula for mixing a song:

65% alone at first...

35% with artist or producer in the middle...

10% with A&R and artist managent at the end... or should I say still alone?


Peaxce
So thats how you breakdown the 110% pie...

I rather mix alone until I think it's right, then I bring in the others to approved and move on from there.
Old 12th April 2003
  #11
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e-cue's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by thethrillfactor
Formula for mixing a song:

65% alone at first...

35% with artist or producer in the middle...

10% with A&R and artist managent at the end... or should I say still alone?


Peaxce
LOL... I'm with you on the extra 10%... I'm usually the same. I like being alone when I try things out so my client doesn't think I'm audio ******** if something doesn't work out. The 35% usually isn't "right or wrong" as much as it's to make sure I'm not missing tracks and creatively have gone in the direction they want.
Old 12th April 2003
  #12
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Jules's Avatar
Just like Tim said

"By myself for as much of the process as I can get away with. I only like the client in the room for a final tweak or two... doesn't allways happen that way but that's my preference."


However I do need them back:

To show off to
To make me feel bad that I missed something
To get their input
Because I get stuck after a while
Mostly because I like to do fader moves with an audience

I feel I hav been "off to Mars" while on my own, having the clients there "brings me back"


Old 12th April 2003
  #13
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Skwaidu's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Hmmm.... I sometimes NEED the client in the room for feedback and maybe even motivation... Of course only one person besides me for 80% of the time and that person has to be informed enough about the mixing process not to ask dumb stuff all the time. Artist or producer, NOT A&R or anything like that...

Of course I get for example drum sounds happening faster alone. And if there's Auto- tuning involved(I do it graphically), that's me alone in the room and everybody else at the lounge, with me taking a cigarette break every 20 minutes because of the frustration... They should improve that user interface seriously!

-Mikko
Old 12th April 2003
  #14
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mdbeh's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by Skwaidu
...with me taking a cigarette break every 20 minutes because of the frustration...
It's funny... I quit smoking about six months ago. Overall, it's been a great improvement, but I sometimes feel like my "studio clock" is off without cig breaks. It was so nice after finishing a song... hmmm... I better stop think about it...
Old 12th April 2003
  #15
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imacgreg's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by Skwaidu
me taking a cigarette break every 20 minutes because of the frustration... They should improve that user interface seriously!

-Mikko
I ****in agree!!!! It's horrible...
Makes a task that already sucks even that much worse.
Ian
Old 12th April 2003
  #16
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Tim L's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by Jules
... I feel I hav been "off to Mars" while on my own, having the clients there "brings me back"
You've got a point there with the audience thing but Mars aint' so bad really...
Old 12th April 2003
  #17
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Messiah's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by mdbeh
It's funny... I quit smoking about six months ago. Overall, it's been a great improvement, but I sometimes feel like my "studio clock" is off without cig breaks. It was so nice after finishing a song... hmmm... I better stop think about it...
Same here!! 3 months stopped now. I didn't think I could do it as during 'full on' sessions I was smoking 30 a day easily. I have taken to eating instead...and chewing gum replaces cigarettes in the studio. grudge

Mixing is also the time when it's hardest to remember why you stopped, IMO!! Even when I was a smoker I could easily snap when mixing;-
(drummer: I can't hear the kick...
me: get out now, I'll tell you when you can come back in..., etc..)

I'm worse now, but healthier....

Personally, I like the band/artist to be on call for me when I need them, and spend the rest of the time on my own as much as possible.
Old 14th April 2003
  #18
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Drumsound's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I explain to the client that the first hour or so is not the creative part of mixing and that I need to do my thing. I then keep going until the mix is close, very close, or not telling me what to do next. Then I get the client involved and the mix gets better quickly.
Old 14th April 2003
  #19
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stuntmixer's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I'm glad that I am not alone in this mixing alone thing, though I sometimes like the amused look on clients faces when I turn around and realize that for 45 minutes they have been watching me dance around, chasing the mix up and down the board. A sense of solitude is especially helpful when getting the ryhthm section going as I have such a physical reaction to the groove when it's working.

I HATE HATE HATE having my flow broken by the "the bass is too loud" or "the vocal is too quiet" while I am getting drums together.

Usually by time I get to mixing the artist and I have a pretty good understanding of the direction the song/project is going so I can get it most of the way there on my own. I also love the perspective they can offer by coming in with fresh ears after I have been crawling around inside the tune for hours.

OT -- Last weekend I did a 10-song, two day, top to bottom, rock and roll masacre that was FUN FUN FUN. I have been falling to a rut of these two to three week projects (which I really like) and it was a ball to just GO with no looking back....ever. We starting drum sounds Sat morning and finished mixing late Sun night. It felt like ROCK AND ROLL.

Anyway,
Old 15th April 2003
  #20
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🎧 15 years
When I mix alone I'm always by myself.

-R
Old 16th April 2003
  #21
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Remoteness's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Yes, indeed.
Old 16th April 2003
  #22
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by RKrizman
When I mix alone I'm always by myself.

-R
Me too, but I do have some pretty intense conversations with me in the process.


Regards,
Brian T
Old 16th April 2003
  #23
SawSlut
 
OzNimbus's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I prefer to mix by myself... usually to a point of 80% done...

What I'll do is get it to that point, and leave something really obvious wrong.. that way when I call the clients in for thier input, they'll point out what needs to be fixed... thereby giving them affirmation that they've had some input on how the song was mixed. Things usually go a lot quicker that way

-0z-
Old 16th April 2003
  #24
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Jay Kahrs's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Let's say you have 10 days to mix 10 songs. Would you rather;

A) Mix a song a day. No chance for recalls. You gotta live with it forever.

B) Mix the whole album 10 times and pick the mixes you like later.

Old 16th April 2003
  #25
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 15 years
one a day works well for me.
Old 17th April 2003
  #26
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🎧 15 years
I like to finish a mix and then start the next one. I come in the next and finish the one from the night before and start the next. This is when I working on my usual schedule which tend to be nights, so sessions are about 4-6 hours. When I have a full day (8-10 hours) I usually finish two and start a third. Often dinner break is taken before a mix is finished. There are exceptions to the rule.

I don't take good notes, so a recall won't happen in the true sense. I usually go for a full re-mix if that's what’s called for.
Old 17th April 2003
  #27
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🎧 15 years
i like to mix alone and then have the client come in and approve/disapprove and then make them leave again while i make the changes. i can't stand having the client in my ear about "the tenor harmony is too loud on that part..." maybe it's just my clients, but i'm considering not handing out "rough mix cd's" at the end of a session anymore, as they always come back with a billion nitpicky things they want to re-record that would've been "fixed in the mix" anyhow... mixing alone that can make a guy happy
Old 17th April 2003
  #28
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davemc's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by theunity
i like to mix alone and then have the client come in and approve/disapprove and then make them leave again while i make the changes. i can't stand having the client in my ear about "the tenor harmony is too loud on that part..." maybe it's just my clients, but i'm considering not handing out "rough mix cd's" at the end of a session anymore, as they always come back with a billion nitpicky things they want to re-record that would've been "fixed in the mix" anyhow... mixing alone that can make a guy happy
Tell me about the laundry list as you give out a progress CD
Normally I mix with the client there and do the dance.. You know one guys stuff up and then the other.. Then try to explain that not everyone can be the biggest....
For the Bands I do I would prefer to mix with one member so I do not go off tangent from where they want to go.. Otherwise I would give a Balanced mix.
I always end up with most of them there as I do a lot of young bands.
Amazing how some bands want there mix to sound like x and y cd balance but with my guitar up and teh drums louder and the bass louder etc etc..
Old 17th April 2003
  #29
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theunity's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
would it be wrong of me to refuse to give out session "rough mixes" at the end of the night? i'm a little bothered because today these guys called and woke me up wanting another cd and then this evening called me at my girlfriend's house (how they got that number i don't know...) to tell me that there are some problems they want to come in and fix. i hang up the phone and think... "holy crap, you mean there are problems in a totally dry rough mix that you've listened to non-stop for the past 5 hours? who would've ever thought..." idiots
Old 17th April 2003
  #30
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doug_hti's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally posted by theunity
would it be wrong of me to refuse to give out session "rough mixes" at the end of the night? s
Yes it's wrong to not give out rough mixes at the end of the night to clients.
Is it wrong to not give idiots that don't understand the idea of a rough mix and/or the appropriate times to which discuss the rough mix, NO.


As far as mixing alone, once it gets to the creative stages beyond most of the static bussing, eq, efx, and dynamics, I think it can be good to have the feedback every once in a while from fresh ears and maybe from the person that envisioned the song in the first place (singer/songwriter).

And every major mix session I've been around with singer/songwriter artists, it's one song mixed per day. A&R (exec producer)people will usually pop in around 9:30 pm or so with actual producer, followed by the artist at around 10:30 or 11 for the final thoughts and/or approval that night. A&R person may show up again first thing in the morning (11 or 12), if changes were requested to do the print, on to next mix by 1pm. The mixer and their assistant are left alone til the very last stages of each mix, except under odd circumstances.
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