The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Live mix vs Recorded mix
Old 20th December 2002
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
RSMITH123's Avatar
 

Live mix vs Recorded mix

Sorry if out of place, I didn't know where else to ask YOU guys.

When doing a large and loud live mix is it proper to mix it significantly warmer that you would if it was a recording?

Why?... In attending several very loud concerts I started noticing that people were mixing much warmer (less highs). It seemed to allow for louder volume with less pain. The downfall is some lost intelligebility. So is this a standard practice?
Old 21st December 2002
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Steve Smith's Avatar
 

There is a fine line between "harsh" and "dull" I think the key about live sound is to really be extreme with how you "fit" things into a mix.. I do way more high and low pass filtering on a Live mix than I do in the studio.. I find if you leave lots of room on top for the definition of the vocal and guitars, you can get crisp without being harsh..

NYC Drew, any suggestions?
Old 21st December 2002
  #3
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Sorry if out of place, I didn't know where else to ask YOU guys.

When doing a large and loud live mix is it proper to mix it significantly warmer that you would if it was a recording?

Why?... In attending several very loud concerts I started noticing that people were mixing much warmer (less highs). It seemed to allow for louder volume with less pain. The downfall is some lost intelligebility. So is this a standard practice?

Quote:
Originally posted by Steve Smith
There is a fine line between "harsh" and "dull" I think the key about live sound is to really be extreme with how you "fit" things into a mix.. I do way more high and low pass filtering on a Live mix than I do in the studio.. I find if you leave lots of room on top for the definition of the vocal and guitars, you can get crisp without being harsh..

NYC Drew, any suggestions?

1. The first constraint I face is usually...the PA. A lot of "well" designed systems do weird things with your pristene audio if you're

a) out of the "sweet spot"
b) beyond the "normal" throw of the PA (under or over)
c) outside the coverage area of the PA (say it has a horizontal dispersion of 90 degrees from each stack)

Many, many, many, many times I've had to fall back on my headphones to hear what the sound is like out of the console, sometimes there's just so much you can get out of the system components....sometimes for the required SPL you have to deliver, the processors/crossovers are already limiting/compressing

2. The second hurdle we (ok then, me :eek: ) face is ...the acoustics of the venue. Sometimes you just can't have all that HF bouncing around in an arena, or a nice unpadded concrete hall - without feedback.

For whatever reasons, sometimes cabinets are flown/ hung / scaffolded behind the "mic line", so ya gotta do some drastic surgery to avoid those said high freqs taking off.

Even if the speakers are properly located, any myraid of factors can cause leakage from the PA to the mics on stage.

I've seen systems that use (for example) the Sabine feedback exterminator that also adversely affect the fidelty of a system in an attempt to curb feedback.

NYC Drew
Old 21st December 2002
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Steve Smith's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally posted by NYC Drew
1. The I've seen systems that use (for example) the Sabine feedback exterminator that also adversely affect the fidelty of a system in an attempt to curb feedback.

NYC Drew
Seeing ( and hearing) that thing in operation qualifies as a good reason for needing therapy.
Old 23rd December 2002
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
RSMITH123's Avatar
 

Thanks guys.

Well, the last one I heard and liked WAS in an acoustically hard room. When reading your responses, I spent some more time thinking about what I had heard. I know it wasn't dull overall as in the slower songs, the tech really laid into the verbs and delays on the vocals and it was pretty sweet. They definitely had definition and clarity. Maybe what I was hearing was due to the rooms being too hard and live and they had analyzed the room into submission. I don't recall seeing any feedback chasers.

Also, I would bet that if this one mix-tech had employed the idea about significant hi/lo pass "filterage" his mix would have been much better. (although the bass player probably loved it)

Thanks!
Old 23rd December 2002
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Steve Smith's Avatar
 

Analyzing the room can be a very good thing.. auto feedback chasers suck worse than auto-tune..
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump